The Concordance
 
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year of our redemption a thousand four hundred fourscore 2, 3/ 5
wit, Edward, the Prince, a thirteen-year-of-age; Richard, Duke of 2, 3/ 6
bore, professed and observed a religious life in Dartford 2, 3/ 11
was interred at Windsor. A king of such governance 2, 3/ 20
of his reign -- a great part of a 2, 4/ 6
a great part of a long life -- and 2, 4/ 7
never strange. He was a goodly personage and very 2, 4/ 9
prosperity and fortune, without a special grace, hardly refraineth 2, 4/ 21
the prince, not in a constrained fear, but in 2, 4/ 29
constrained fear, but in a willing and loving obedience 2, 4/ 29
which many princes by a long-continued sovereignty decline into 2, 5/ 10
long-continued sovereignty decline into a proud port from debonair 2, 5/ 11
take for greater kindness a little courtesy than a 2, 5/ 21
a little courtesy than a great benefit. So deceased 2, 5/ 21
their age could receive) a marvelous fortress and sure 2, 5/ 27
Richard, Duke of York, a noble man and a 2, 6/ 13
a noble man and a mighty, began not by 2, 6/ 14
blood (albeit he had a goodly prince) utterly rejected 2, 6/ 18
Duke of Clarence, was a goodly, noble prince and 2, 7/ 2
love), or were it a proud appetite of the 2, 7/ 8
thereupon hastily drowned in a butt of malmsey, whose 2, 7/ 13
was close and secret, a deep dissimuler, lowly of 2, 8/ 7
likelihood of speed putteth a man in courage of 2, 9/ 24
and helped to maintain, a long-continued grudge and heart-burning 2, 9/ 27
as it was indeed) a furtherly beginning to the 2, 10/ 1
of his intent, and a sure ground for the 2, 10/ 2
Richard the Lord Hastings, a noble man then Lord 2, 10/ 28
for great causes. Sometimes a thing right well intended 2, 12/ 5
turneth unto worse; or a small displeasure done us 2, 12/ 6
to agree together. Such a pestilent serpent is ambition 2, 12/ 21
you among yourselves in a child's reign fall at 2, 13/ 15
fall at debate, many a good man shall perish 2, 13/ 15
unto the Queen) -- a right honorable man, as 2, 14/ 12
himself, albeit he was a man of age and 2, 15/ 4
unwise oversoon to trust a new friend made of 2, 15/ 22
hour, continued yet scant a fortnight, should be deeper 2, 15/ 23
in their stomachs than a long-accustomed malice many years 2, 15/ 24
face and name of a rebellion -- he secretly 2, 16/ 10
the realm fall on a roar. And of all 2, 16/ 24
in good speed, with a sober company. Now was 2, 17/ 7
and the Lord Rivers, a great while. But incontinent 2, 17/ 16
the dukes secretly with a few of their most 2, 17/ 21
counsel, wherein they spent a great part of the 2, 17/ 22
perceiving well so great a thing without his knowledge 2, 18/ 11
few hours so great a change marvelously misliked. Howbeit 2, 18/ 13
began (as he was a very well-spoken man) in 2, 18/ 22
rooms." And thus in a goodly array they came 2, 19/ 3
his presence they picked a quarrel to the Lord 2, 19/ 7
Duke of Gloucester sent a dish from his own 2, 20/ 3
hastily to the Queen, a little before the midnight 2, 20/ 18
that helped to carry a wrong way. The Queen 2, 21/ 25
likely, to come to a field, though both parts 2, 23/ 22
the intenders of such a purpose would rather have 2, 24/ 12
Russell, Bishop of Lincoln, a wise man and a 2, 25/ 5
a wise man and a good, and of much 2, 25/ 6
that thought every day a year till it were 2, 25/ 12
his brother honorable, and a thing that should cease 2, 27/ 21
For it would be a thing that should turn 2, 27/ 29
there never so undevout a king that durst that 2, 28/ 7
violate, or so holy a bishop that durst it 2, 28/ 8
safeguard of so many a good man's life. And 2, 28/ 12
forbid) upon so great a mischief, the sanctuary would 2, 29/ 21
say that we were a wise sort of councillors 2, 29/ 30
sort of councillors about a king, that let his 2, 29/ 31
but that it is a deed of pity that 2, 30/ 7
him to that deed, a pardon serveth, which either 2, 30/ 21
the other side, what a sort there be commonly 2, 30/ 26
brought to naught. "What a rabble of thieves, murderers 2, 30/ 28
gave them not only a safeguard for the harm 2, 31/ 16
they have done, but a license also to do 2, 31/ 17
other men since, of a certain religious fear, have 2, 31/ 22
it, let us take a pain therewith and let 2, 31/ 23
therewith and let it a God's name stand in 2, 31/ 23
is nor can be a sanctuary man. "A sanctuary 2, 31/ 27
be a sanctuary man. "A sanctuary serveth always to 2, 31/ 28
every man every place a sanctuary. But where a 2, 32/ 6
a sanctuary. But where a man is by lawful 2, 32/ 6
give any place such a privilege that it shall 2, 32/ 25
that it shall discharge a man of his debts 2, 32/ 25
Church, the goods of a sanctuary man should be 2, 32/ 29
truth. And what if a man's wife will take 2, 32/ 33
there -- then if a child will take sanctuary 2, 33/ 4
therein, though it be a childish fear, yet is 2, 33/ 7
which they reckoned as a prison -- and there 2, 34/ 19
both as, for yet a while, to be in 2, 35/ 3
good looking to, hath a while been so sore 2, 35/ 6
is so newly rather a little amended than well 2, 35/ 7
able to bear out a new surfeit. And albeit 2, 35/ 13
both, than here as a sanctuary man, to their 2, 35/ 24
where they call it a thing so sore against 2, 36/ 19
cause." The Cardinal made a countenance to the other 2, 36/ 32
Forsooth, he hath found a goodly gloss by which 2, 38/ 3
place that may defend a thief may not save 2, 38/ 4
God he may prove a protector!) -- troweth he 2, 38/ 8
because the King lacketh a playfellow' -- be ye 2, 38/ 13
that maketh so high a matter upon such a 2, 38/ 14
a matter upon such a trifling pretext; as though 2, 38/ 15
will. Howbeit, this is a gay matter. Suppose he 2, 38/ 22
except the law give a child a guardian only 2, 39/ 4
law give a child a guardian only for his 2, 39/ 4
cradle and preserved to a more prosperous fortune, which 2, 39/ 13
inherit less land than a kingdom! I can no 2, 39/ 33
said unto her, for a final conclusion, that he 2, 40/ 11
she would give them a resolute answer to the 2, 40/ 16
with these words stood a good while in a 2, 40/ 24
a good while in a great study. And forasmuch 2, 40/ 24
to make you such a proof as, if either 2, 41/ 16
that the desire of a kingdom knoweth no kindred 2, 41/ 24
to this matter, sending a privy messenger unto him 2, 42/ 32
the Protector might with a beck destroy them all 2, 43/ 20
were then such that a man could not well 2, 43/ 27
own mind promised him a great quantity of the 2, 44/ 7
they were thus at a point between themselves, they 2, 44/ 8
things, men's hearts of a secret instinct of nature 2, 44/ 25
of itself sometimes before a tempest -- or were 2, 44/ 27
this Catesby, which was a man well-learned in the 2, 45/ 25
that day. And after a little talking with them 2, 47/ 5
you, let us have a mess of them." "Gladly 2, 47/ 7
sent his servant for a mess of strawberries. The 2, 47/ 10
to spare him for a little while, departed thence 2, 47/ 11
them, all changed, with a wonderful sour, angry countenance 2, 47/ 16
he had sat still a while, thus he began 2, 47/ 20
arm, where he showed a wearish, withered arm and 2, 48/ 10
this matter was but a quarrel. For well they 2, 48/ 13
King, or else of a certain kind of fidelity 2, 48/ 22
And therewith, as in a great anger, he clapped 2, 48/ 26
fist upon the board, a great rap. At which 2, 48/ 27
without the chamber. Therewith, a door clapped, and in 2, 48/ 28
but heavily he took a priest at adventure and 2, 49/ 14
at adventure and made a short shrift, for a 2, 49/ 14
a short shrift, for a longer would not be 2, 49/ 14
head laid down upon a long log of timber 2, 49/ 22
souls our Lord pardon. A marvelous case is it 2, 49/ 25
the Lord Stanley sent a trusty secret messenger unto 2, 49/ 30
he had so fearful a dream, in which him 2, 50/ 1
which him thought that a boar with his tusks 2, 50/ 3
then had the boar a cause likely to raze 2, 50/ 17
and custom observed as a token oftentimes notably foregoing 2, 50/ 31
he were up, came a knight unto him, as 2, 51/ 1
in that purpose -- a mean man at that 2, 51/ 4
his horse and common a while with a priest 2, 51/ 6
common a while with a priest whom he met 2, 51/ 6
have no need of a priest yet" -- and 2, 51/ 9
thing is often seen a sign of change. But 2, 51/ 12
he with one Hastings, a pursuivant of his own 2, 51/ 16
this honorable man -- a good knight and a 2, 52/ 17
a good knight and a gentle, of great authority 2, 52/ 17
courage fore-studied no perils; a loving man, and passing 2, 52/ 21
forth farther about, like a wind in every man's 2, 52/ 24
herald of arms with a proclamation to be made 2, 53/ 12
parchment, in so well a set hand, and therewith 2, 54/ 5
of itself so long a process, that every child 2, 54/ 6
about him, "Here is a gay, goodly cast, foul 2, 54/ 12
away for haste." And a merchant answered him that 2, 54/ 12
And when he had a while laid unto her 2, 54/ 18
this cause -- as a goodly, continent prince, clean 2, 54/ 24
cross in procession upon a Sunday, with a taper 2, 54/ 28
upon a Sunday, with a taper in her hand 2, 54/ 28
of the people cast a comely rud in her 2, 54/ 32
procured it more of a corrupt intent than any 2, 55/ 6
able soon to pierce a soft, tender heart. But 2, 55/ 16
not presuming to touch a King's concubine), left her 2, 55/ 18
for reverence or for a certain friendly faithfulness. Proper 2, 55/ 23
filled would make it a fair face. Yet delighted 2, 56/ 1
her pleasant behavior. For a proper wit had she 2, 56/ 2
hurt, but to many a man's comfort and relief 2, 56/ 15
this woman too slight a thing to be written 2, 56/ 27
and whoso doth us a good turn, we write 2, 57/ 6
such lawless enterprises, as a man that had been 2, 57/ 23
of the world and a shrewd wit, short and 2, 57/ 24
whereof he was, of a proud heart, highly desirous 2, 58/ 18
two, the one had a sermon in praise of 2, 58/ 27
break the matter, in a sermon at Paul's Cross 2, 59/ 13
to entreat and conclude a marriage between King Edward 2, 60/ 8
there came, to make a suit by petition to 2, 60/ 12
queen), at that time a widow -- born of 2, 60/ 15
unto one John Grey, a squire whom King Henry 2, 60/ 19
was both fair, of a good favor, moderate of 2, 61/ 6
And finally, after many a meeting, much wooing, and 2, 61/ 18
to fall off for a word. And in conclusion 2, 61/ 22
also, to marry in a noble progeny out of 2, 62/ 3
only as it were a rich man that would 2, 62/ 11
his maid, only for a little wanton dotage upon 2, 62/ 12
unsitting thing -- and a very blemish, and high 2, 62/ 26
the sacred majesty of a prince, that ought as 2, 62/ 27
well, yet was at a point in his own 2, 63/ 4
that albeit marriage, being a spiritual thing, ought rather 2, 63/ 6
For small pleasure taketh a man of all that 2, 63/ 20
should in choice of a wife rather be ruled 2, 63/ 32
as though I were a ward that were bound 2, 63/ 33
by the appointment of a guardian! I would not 2, 64/ 1
I would not be a king with that condition 2, 64/ 1
days. That she is a widow and hath already 2, 64/ 10
blessed Lady, I am a bachelor and have some 2, 64/ 11
each of us hath a proof that neither of 2, 64/ 12
she shall bring forth a young prince that shall 2, 64/ 16
understand it is forbidden a priest, but I never 2, 64/ 18
that it was forbidden a prince." The Duchess with 2, 64/ 19
at his return assembled a great puissance against the 2, 65/ 15
of Warwick, which was a wise man and a 2, 65/ 29
a wise man and a courageous warrior, and of 2, 65/ 30
had not reckoned it a greater thing to make 2, 65/ 33
greater thing to make a king than to be 2, 65/ 33
king than to be a king. But nothing lasteth 2, 66/ 1
appear upon how slippery a ground the Protector built 2, 66/ 10
Doctor Shaa should in a sermon at Paul's Cross 2, 66/ 17
at Paul's Cross, in a great audience (as always 2, 66/ 26
unto the people, with a clear and a loud 2, 69/ 10
with a clear and a loud voice, in this 2, 69/ 10
break unto you of a matter right great and 2, 69/ 13
forgotten, that was for a word spoken in haste 2, 70/ 14
which there could lack a pretext. For since the 2, 71/ 2
battle, it sufficed in a rich man for a 2, 71/ 4
a rich man for a pretext of treason to 2, 71/ 4
noble land, besides many a good town ransacked and 2, 71/ 22
days unto Shore's wife, a vile and abominable strumpet 2, 71/ 32
her from her husband, a right honest, substantial young 2, 72/ 2
great destruction of many a good woman, and great 2, 72/ 12
than to have such a villainy done them. And 2, 72/ 16
word of God, namely a man so cunning and 2, 73/ 4
bearing, as nature requireth, a filial reverence to the 2, 73/ 27
that realm that hath a child to their king 2, 74/ 18
choosing them so good a king, and unto yourselves 2, 74/ 30
lives heard so evil a tale so well-told. But 2, 75/ 14
the Recorder, called Fitzwilliam, a sad man and an 2, 75/ 24
and said, "This is a marvelous obstinate silence"; and 2, 76/ 1
were, the sound of a swarm of bees; till 2, 76/ 15
and said it was a goodly cry and a 2, 76/ 27
a goodly cry and a joyful to hear, every 2, 76/ 27
the being there of a great and honorable company 2, 77/ 14
honorable company, to move a great matter unto His 2, 77/ 15
but stood above in a gallery over them where 2, 77/ 27
by the Protector's license, a little rounded as well 2, 79/ 13
the Protector that for a final conclusion, that the 2, 79/ 16
he would give them a resolute answer to the 2, 79/ 22
With this there was a great shout crying "King 2, 80/ 16
at the consecration of a bishop, every man wotteth 2, 80/ 27
own will. And in a stage play all the 2, 81/ 1
the sultan is percase a souter. Yet if one 2, 81/ 2
day the Protector, with a great train, went to 2, 81/ 12
the chiefest duty of a king to minister the 2, 81/ 22
that he might show a proof thereof, he commanded 2, 81/ 31
men took it for a vanity. In his return 2, 82/ 2
met he saluted. For a mind that knoweth itself 2, 82/ 3
itself guilty is in a manner dejected to a 2, 82/ 4
a manner dejected to a servile flattery. When he 2, 82/ 4
cause and make him a kindly king. Whereupon he 2, 83/ 14
of the Tower, with a letter (and credence also 2, 83/ 17
night he said unto a secret page of his 2, 83/ 24
his, "Ah, whom shall a man trust? Those that 2, 83/ 24
James Tyrell, which was a man of right goodly 2, 83/ 30
worthy to have served a much better prince, if 2, 84/ 1
at the draught -- a convenient carpet for such 2, 84/ 15
convenient carpet for such a council) and came out 2, 84/ 15
him to Brackenbury with a letter by which he 2, 84/ 21
that kept them -- a fellow fleshed in murder 2, 85/ 13
Dighton, his own horse-keeper; a big, broad, square, strong 2, 85/ 15
their mouths, that within a while, smothered and stifled 2, 85/ 20
in the ground, under a great heap of stones 2, 85/ 29
burying in so vile a corner, saying that he 2, 86/ 4
have them buried in a better place because they 2, 86/ 4
place because they were a king's sons. (Lo the 2, 86/ 5
the honorable courage of a king!) Whereupon they say 2, 86/ 5
Whereupon they say that a priest of Sir Robert 2, 86/ 6
never gave this world a more notable example neither 2, 86/ 21
torn and tugged like a cur dog. And the 2, 87/ 6
He took ill rest a nights, lay long waking 2, 87/ 16
came to John Ward, a chamberer of like secret 2, 88/ 5
wait upon him with a thousand good fellows if 2, 88/ 13
conspired against him that a man would marvel whereof 2, 89/ 5
say that the Duke, a little before the coronation 2, 89/ 8
destruction. The Bishop was a man of great natural 2, 90/ 22
and mistress of wisdom) a deep insight in politic 2, 91/ 20
and then balk out a little braid of envy 2, 91/ 24
that I would with a dead man strive against 2, 92/ 9
not to spurn against a prick nor labor to 2, 92/ 13
had in his forehead a bunch of flesh fled 2, 93/ 4
of flesh fled away a great pace. The fox 2, 93/ 4
for the rule of a realm, as our Lord 2, 93/ 24