REALMS.................2
his honor in other realms about than the crown 2, 78/ 28
of the two noble realms England and France -- 2, 80/ 9
 
 REASON.................10
that it neither was reason nor in any wise 2, 14/ 22
her nor any man's reason content her, then shall 2, 27/ 9
she shall be with reason contented, and all thing 2, 28/ 15
as far forth as reason will. Which is not 2, 31/ 24
must have it. And reason, since no man hath 2, 32/ 14
yet is there less reason in our case than 2, 33/ 6
the night's rest by reason of his day thoughts 2, 50/ 12
No more is it reason that it mislike any 2, 63/ 27
husband before God. By reason of which words, such 2, 64/ 29
better believe it. And reason is that it so 2, 73/ 2
 
 REASONABLE.............1
motion was good and reasonable, and to the King 2, 27/ 20
 
 REAVE..................1
out, they rob and reave and kill, and come 2, 31/ 15
 
 REAVERS................1
waxen wild, robbers and reavers walking at liberty, uncorrected 2, 14/ 5
 
 REBELLION..............1
and name of a rebellion -- he secretly, therefore 2, 16/ 11
 
 REBUKE.................1
sounded openly to the rebuke of the Protector's own 2, 59/ 25
 
 RECEIVE................2
as their age could receive) a marvelous fortress and 2, 5/ 27
only was content to receive him, but also wooed 2, 91/ 3
 
 RECEIVED...............5
great gifts which he received, that they looked for 2, 11/ 7
His Grace -- which received them in very joyous 2, 19/ 5
the citizens in violet, received him reverently at Hornsea 2, 24/ 19
lords with him had received this young duke, they 2, 42/ 13
delivered and the keys received, Sir James appointed the 2, 84/ 25
 
 RECEIVETH..............1
realm) much honorable fame receiveth among all other nations 2, 72/ 26
 
 RECIDIVATION...........1
the peril in the recidivation that was in the 2, 35/ 11
 
 RECK...................1
I neither wot nor reck, so I were once 2, 93/ 6
 
 RECKED.................1
his points, nor aught recked of himself, but with 2, 85/ 8
 
 RECKON.................7
youth, of which I reckon the only surety to 2, 11/ 19
it. And therefore they reckon no privilege broken though 2, 37/ 17
what place could I reckon him sure, if he 2, 37/ 30
you all that would reckon himself lord of his 2, 69/ 24
-- that ye should reckon my words of as 2, 73/ 3
living, men would not reckon that he could have 2, 83/ 11
custody, where he might reckon himself at home, and 2, 92/ 24
 
 RECKONED...............6
also for that they reckoned this demeanor attempted not 2, 22/ 24
that place which they reckoned as a prison -- 2, 34/ 19
good surety; when he reckoned himself surest, he lost 2, 52/ 14
not unprofitable. For he reckoned the amity of no 2, 63/ 10
if he had not reckoned it a greater thing 2, 65/ 33
in the household were reckoned very surely for the 2, 67/ 24
 
 RECKONETH..............1
hath shrewd wit), she reckoneth herself no wiser than 2, 29/ 2
 
 RECKONING..............1
in so special trust, reckoning himself to no man 2, 45/ 22
 
 RECOMFORTING...........1
weeping. But the lords, recomforting him with as good 2, 13/ 26
 
 RECOMMENDATION.........1
Persale, after his master's recommendation, showed him that he 2, 88/ 11
 
 RECORDER...............4
unto "but by the Recorder, which is the mouth 2, 75/ 21
answer." With that, the Recorder, called Fitzwilliam, a sad 2, 75/ 22
them himself. But the Recorder so tempered his tale 2, 75/ 29
with the Mayor and Recorder of London. And after 2, 79/ 14
 
 RECOUNTED..............1
answer John Green returning, recounted the same to King 2, 83/ 22
 
 RECOURSE...............1
from the law and recourse to justice, was begun 2, 14/ 4
 
 RECOVERED..............1
little amended than well recovered, that I dare put 2, 35/ 7
 
 RECOVERY...............1
that he despaired all recovery, then he, considering the 2, 10/ 15
 
 RECREATION.............3
but partly also in recreation and moderate pleasure -- 2, 26/ 8
their both disport and recreation; which thing the lord 2, 34/ 26
that their youth without recreation and play cannot endure 2, 34/ 28
 
 RED....................1
one Pottier, dwelling in Red Cross Street, without Cripplegate 2, 9/ 10
 
 REDEEM.................1
no way left to redeem his offense by benefits 2, 43/ 18
 
 REDEMPTION.............1
the year of our redemption a thousand four hundred 2, 3/ 4
 
 REDOUND................1
not but it shall redound unto your great weal 2, 76/ 31
 
 REDOUNDETH.............1
stand. And verily, it redoundeth greatly to the dishonor 2, 26/ 16
 
 REDOUNDING.............1
to many things highly redounding to the diminishing of 2, 53/ 22
 
 REDRESS................2
the Queen, for the redress of this matter, some 2, 26/ 26
gracious hands to the redress and amendment thereof, by 2, 78/ 16
 
 REFRAIN................3
there present that could refrain from weeping. But the 2, 13/ 26
of his presence should refrain evil disposed persons from 2, 14/ 8
suffice, as meseemeth, to refrain you from her marriage 2, 62/ 25
 
 REFRAINETH.............1
a special grace, hardly refraineth. This fault not greatly 2, 4/ 22
 
 REFUGE.................1
be some places of refuge for both. But as 2, 30/ 13
 
 REFUSE.................4
goodness, he will not refuse, for the King's sake 2, 26/ 32
Now, then, if she refuse in the deliverance of 2, 29/ 9
Which, if ye finally refuse to deliver him, I 2, 37/ 18
hard that he would refuse" -- meaning this by 2, 83/ 29
 
 REGAL..................1
the usurpation of the regal dignity upon himself. And 2, 9/ 26
 
 REGARD.................7
if ye anything earthly regard -- either God or 2, 13/ 22
their destruction, having more regard to their old variance 2, 16/ 20
dishonor, and as much regard took to his wealth 2, 28/ 30
without sin somewhat less regard than they do. "Now 2, 29/ 23
and maketh, to that regard, for every man every 2, 32/ 5
his, than for the regard of any temporal advantage 2, 63/ 8
of themselves, so much regard the cleanness of their 2, 72/ 14
 
 REGARDED...............2
he somewhat the less regarded it, because he thought 2, 10/ 12
that so much more regarded his honor in other 2, 78/ 28
 
 REGNO..................1
when he said, "Vae regno cuius rex puer est' 2, 74/ 17
 
 REHEARSAL..............1
by the Mayor, made rehearsal to the commons of 2, 75/ 28
 
 REHEARSE...............3
not, I suppose, to rehearse of these any more 2, 70/ 28
well, need that I rehearse you again that ye 2, 72/ 33
present matter, I shall rehearse you the dolorous end 2, 83/ 4
 
 REHEARSED..............4
pass the things before rehearsed. But when he had 2, 43/ 4
feigned friends. I have rehearsed this business about this 2, 66/ 9
by, somewhat louder, he rehearsed them the same matter 2, 75/ 9
the Duke had twice rehearsed them himself. But the 2, 75/ 29
 
 REIGN..................11
twenty years of his reign -- a great part 2, 4/ 6
the time of his reign, he was with his 2, 5/ 7
yourselves in a child's reign fall at debate, many 2, 13/ 15
last year of his reign. But the Duke of 2, 24/ 23
should not any longer reign upon them -- both 2, 79/ 17
he had begun his reign the twenty-sixth day of 2, 82/ 8
the time of his reign never ceased there cruel 2, 82/ 14
that he should not reign, but his uncle should 2, 84/ 29
long to live to reign and rule in the 2, 86/ 17
should take by his reign, my lord Morton answered 2, 92/ 4
and King Edward to reign -- I was never 2, 92/ 9
 
 REIGNED................2
six days, and thereof reigned two and twenty years 2, 3/ 3
that that never prince reigned upon any people that 2, 78/ 22