SHAME..................5
miss), that her great shame won her much praise 2, 55/ 1
his life, for very shame of the world, into 2, 59/ 5
friar forced for no shame, and so it harmed 2, 59/ 7
durst look out, for shame, but kept him out 2, 68/ 28
spoken of him much shame, it so struck him 2, 68/ 33
 
 SHAMEFUL...............1
for wonder of this shameful sermon. After which once 2, 68/ 26
 
 SHARP..................1
and merciful, in war sharp and fierce, in the 2, 4/ 13
 
 SHE....................135
of her whose name she bore, professed and observed 2, 3/ 10
the last (for yet she liveth), is by the 2, 3/ 16
in her travail that she could not be delivered 2, 7/ 24
and also for that she thought him secretly familiar 2, 11/ 3
their defense whose power, she wist well, far stretched 2, 16/ 23
like to fall where she least would -- all 2, 16/ 26
the time that ever she dissuaded the gathering of 2, 20/ 28
of Westminster, in which she then lay, into the 2, 20/ 30
nothing so sore as she took it for, and 2, 22/ 1
woe worth him," quoth she, "for he is one 2, 22/ 4
the King's Councillors, that she should keep in sanctuary 2, 25/ 21
the realm. And if she be percase so obstinate 2, 27/ 6
uttermost devoir. Howbeit, if she could be in no 2, 27/ 26
it. I trust that she shall be with reason 2, 28/ 14
it upon my soul, she well knoweth she needeth 2, 28/ 21
soul, she well knoweth she needeth no such thing 2, 28/ 21
kin. Whose honor if she as much desired as 2, 28/ 29
to her own will, she would be as loath 2, 28/ 31
us be. For if she have any wit (as 2, 28/ 32
wit (as would God she had as good will 2, 29/ 1
as good will as she hath shrewd wit), she 2, 29/ 1
she hath shrewd wit), she reckoneth herself no wiser 2, 29/ 2
herself no wiser than she thinketh some that be 2, 29/ 2
of whose faithful mind she nothing doubteth, but verily 2, 29/ 3
him from her if she bide there. And we 2, 29/ 5
be with her, if she come thence and bide 2, 29/ 6
be. "Now, then, if she refuse in the deliverance 2, 29/ 9
of them whose wisdom she knoweth, whose troth she 2, 29/ 10
she knoweth, whose troth she well trusteth -- it 2, 29/ 10
go to, suppose that she fear -- as who 2, 29/ 12
own shadow? The more she feareth to deliver him 2, 29/ 13
her hands. For if she cast such fond doubts 2, 29/ 14
such fond doubts that she fear his hurt -- 2, 29/ 15
hurt -- then will she fear that he shall 2, 29/ 15
be fetched thence. For she will soon think that 2, 29/ 16
do. "Now, then, if she doubt lest he might 2, 29/ 25
not likely enough that she shall send him somewhere 2, 29/ 26
I doubt not but she now as sore mindeth 2, 29/ 27
let thereof. And if she might happen to bring 2, 29/ 28
will take sanctuary because she list to run from 2, 32/ 33
I would ween if she can allege none other 2, 32/ 34
his honor, or that she should by presence of 2, 33/ 30
or else that if she finally were determined to 2, 34/ 1
to convey him; which she was likely to mind 2, 34/ 3
to his estate. And she in this doing should 2, 34/ 20
which he wist well she specially tendered), not only 2, 34/ 23
Nay, verily, sir," quoth she. "Nor why they should 2, 36/ 27
off, and also that she began to kindle and 2, 40/ 9
the matter. But if she were content to deliver 2, 40/ 13
his estate. And if she would give them a 2, 40/ 15
that matter, in which she thought that he and 2, 40/ 18
at hand, so that she verily thought she could 2, 40/ 27
that she verily thought she could not keep him 2, 40/ 27
him elsewhere, neither had she time to serve her 2, 40/ 29
out of sanctuary, which she thought to be now 2, 41/ 2
-- and partly, as she thought it might fortune 2, 41/ 4
be false, so well she wist it was either 2, 41/ 5
or bootless: wherefore, if she should needs go from 2, 41/ 6
needs go from him, she deemed it best to 2, 41/ 6
of the Cardinal's faith she nothing doubted, nor of 2, 41/ 7
other lords', neither, whom she there saw, which as 2, 41/ 8
there saw, which as she feared lest they might 2, 41/ 8
be deceived, so was she well assured they would 2, 41/ 9
be corrupted. Then thought she it should yet make 2, 41/ 10
to his surety, if she with her own hands 2, 41/ 12
And at the last she took the young duke 2, 41/ 13
lords: "My lord," quoth she, "and all my lords 2, 41/ 14
lo, here is," quoth she, "this gentleman, whom I 2, 41/ 18
too little." And therewith she said unto the child 2, 42/ 8
together again." And therewith she kissed him and blessed 2, 42/ 11
folly; and also, if she would, yet would she 2, 48/ 15
she would, yet would she of all folk least 2, 48/ 15
whom of all women she most hated, as that 2, 48/ 16
of all that ever she had -- above the 2, 54/ 16
the manner sake, that she went about to bewitch 2, 54/ 19
bewitch him and that she was of counsel with 2, 54/ 19
so highly taken: that she was naught of her 2, 54/ 24
her hand. In which she went in countenance and 2, 54/ 29
so womanly, and albeit she were out of all 2, 54/ 30
kirtle only, yet went she so fair and lovely 2, 54/ 31
her cheeks (of which she before had most miss 2, 55/ 1
they were coupled ere she were well ripe, she 2, 55/ 11
she were well ripe, she not very fervently loved 2, 55/ 11
fervently loved for whom she never longed. Which was 2, 55/ 12
certain friendly faithfulness. Proper she was and fair -- 2, 55/ 23
see her (for yet she liveth) deem her never 2, 55/ 27
house. For now is she old, lean, withered, and 2, 55/ 30
a proper wit had she, and could both read 2, 56/ 2
to belie the devil), she never abused to any 2, 56/ 15
the King took displeasure, she would mitigate and appease 2, 56/ 16
were out of favor, she would bring them in 2, 56/ 17
that had highly offended, she obtained pardon. Of great 2, 56/ 18
pardon. Of great forfeitures she got men remission. And 2, 56/ 19
in many weighty suits she stood many men in 2, 56/ 20
-- either for that she was content with the 2, 56/ 21
done, or for that she delighted to be sued 2, 56/ 22
and to show what she was able to do 2, 56/ 23
remembered in how much she is now in the 2, 56/ 31
for at this day she beggeth of many at 2, 57/ 12
day had begged if she had not been. Now 2, 57/ 13
Duchess of Bedford ere she married the Lord Woodville 2, 60/ 16
unto the King that she might be restored unto 2, 60/ 30
her speak -- as she was both fair, of 2, 61/ 6
familiarly. Whose appetite when she perceived, she virtuously denied 2, 61/ 15
appetite when she perceived, she virtuously denied him. But 2, 61/ 15
him. But that did she so wisely, and with 2, 61/ 16
so well set, that she rather kindled his desire 2, 61/ 17
and many great promises, she well espied the King's 2, 61/ 19
so greatly increased that she durst somewhat the more 2, 61/ 21
to him whose heart she perceived more firmly set 2, 61/ 22
word. And in conclusion she showed him plainly that 2, 61/ 23
him plainly that as she wist herself too simple 2, 61/ 23
his wife, so thought she herself too good to 2, 61/ 24
sore moved therewith that she dissuaded the marriage as 2, 62/ 1
marriage as much as she possibly might, alleging that 2, 62/ 2
his appointments deluded. And she said also that it 2, 62/ 8
wisdom. And yet therein, she said, was more honesty 2, 62/ 14
misliked, yet was there, she said, "nothing so excellent 2, 62/ 17
were more meetly," quoth she, "for your estate, and 2, 62/ 19
of Elizabeth Grey, though she were in all other 2, 62/ 24
he would gladly that she should take it well 2, 63/ 4
his own mind took she it well or otherwise 2, 63/ 5
one man's days. That she is a widow and 2, 64/ 10
I trust in God she shall bring forth a 2, 64/ 16
so set thereon that she could not pull him 2, 64/ 21
him back, so highly she disdained it that, under 2, 64/ 21
her duty to Godward, she devised to disturb this 2, 64/ 22
for. And albeit that she was by the King's 2, 64/ 34
comfort to affirm that she was ensured unto the 2, 65/ 1
the King, yet when she was solemnly sworn to 2, 65/ 1
to say the truth, she confessed that they were 2, 65/ 2
were never ensured. Howbeit, she said His Grace spoke 2, 65/ 3
words unto her that she verily hoped he would 2, 65/ 4
for such kind words, she would never have shown 2, 65/ 5
Westminster, in sanctuary, where she was delivered of Edward 2, 65/ 24