BATTLE.................2
attaining the crown by battle, so heartily beloved with 2, 3/ 24
attained the crown by battle, it sufficed in a 2, 71/ 3
 
 BATTLES................1
dissension, nor so many battles in the season, nor 2, 71/ 14
 
 BAYNARD'S..............1
themselves together, resorted unto Baynard's Castle, where the Protector 2, 77/ 10
 
 BE.....................259
grace was after to be queen, wife unto King 2, 3/ 8
the last, if this be the last (for yet 2, 3/ 15
each party must needs be other's enemy) that there 2, 3/ 22
by which he should be driven thereto -- for 2, 5/ 4
have them hunt and be merry with him, where 2, 5/ 16
Duke himself, intending to be king -- at the 2, 7/ 9
that she could not be delivered of him uncut 2, 7/ 25
feet forward (as men be borne outward), and, as 2, 7/ 26
Edward's life forethought to be king in case that 2, 8/ 27
king or enterprised to be king himself. But of 2, 9/ 5
the Duke of Gloucester, be king!" What cause he 2, 9/ 13
that their division should be (as it was indeed 2, 10/ 1
those that could not be won might be lost 2, 10/ 6
not be won might be lost ere they looked 2, 10/ 7
them, himself should always be able to rule both 2, 10/ 13
I leave you, such be my children like to 2, 11/ 15
suffice. But childhood must be maintained by men's authority 2, 11/ 22
there must it needs be long ere any good 2, 11/ 26
either party laboreth to be chief, flattery shall have 2, 11/ 28
of love. That we be all men, that we 2, 12/ 9
all men, that we be Christian men, this shall 2, 12/ 9
-- first longing to be next the best, afterward 2, 12/ 26
since things past cannot be gaincalled, much ought we 2, 13/ 7
that occasion again. Now be those griefs past, and 2, 13/ 9
and all is (God be thanked) quiet, and likely 2, 13/ 10
justice, was begun to be far out of good 2, 14/ 4
blood might of youth be rooted in the Prince's 2, 14/ 17
in any wise to be suffered that the young 2, 14/ 22
master and kinsman, should be in the hands and 2, 14/ 23
was full unmeet to be matched with his -- 2, 14/ 28
-- which now to be, as who say, removed 2, 14/ 29
the less noble to be left about him, is 2, 14/ 30
his will, and, thanks be to his grace, that 2, 15/ 14
scant a fortnight, should be deeper settled in their 2, 15/ 24
friends that it should be hard for him to 2, 16/ 7
caused the Queen to be persuaded and brought in 2, 16/ 12
need and also should be jeopardous, the King to 2, 16/ 13
was likely not to be little, and the most 2, 16/ 25
follow the King and be with him at Stony 2, 17/ 14
of their diligence, to be the first that should 2, 18/ 6
brother here, that they be innocent of any such 2, 19/ 20
Rivers, praying him to be of good cheer, all 2, 20/ 4
good cheer, all should be well enough. And he 2, 20/ 4
man wist whither, to be done with God wot 2, 20/ 21
you that all shall be well." "I assure him 2, 21/ 13
him," quoth the Archbishop, "be it as well as 2, 21/ 14
will, it will never be so well as we 2, 21/ 14
all his servants to be called up, and so 2, 21/ 16
blood." "Madam," quoth he, "be ye of good cheer 2, 22/ 5
fearing that it would be ascribed (as it was 2, 22/ 29
that it should never be brought in frame again 2, 23/ 21
yet should the authority be on that side where 2, 23/ 24
causing the fame to be blown about that these 2, 23/ 30
household must needs either be brought away or cast 2, 24/ 7
they went: "Lo, here be the barrels of harnesses 2, 24/ 8
thought most meet, to be Protector of the King 2, 24/ 28
sanctuary or should haply be shortly conveyed to his 2, 25/ 16
they were not to be trusted with the King's 2, 25/ 30
conversation of those that be neither far under nor 2, 26/ 10
of all us that be about His Grace, to 2, 26/ 17
the King's brother should be fain to keep sanctuary 2, 26/ 20
considered that thereby shall be ceased the slanderous rumor 2, 27/ 4
realm. And if she be percase so obstinate, and 2, 27/ 6
continual company he shall be so well cherished and 2, 27/ 11
but that I shall be ready to change it 2, 27/ 17
if the mother might be by good means induced 2, 27/ 22
all agreed also to be thereto most convenient, took 2, 27/ 24
Howbeit, if she could be in no wise entreated 2, 27/ 26
in any wise to be attempted to take him 2, 27/ 28
will. For it would be a thing that should 2, 27/ 29
holy place should now be broken! Which had so 2, 27/ 32
trust that she shall be with reason contented, and 2, 28/ 14
and womanish fear shall be the let." "Womanish fear 2, 28/ 19
no man that will be at war with women 2, 28/ 23
and then should all be soon in rest! Howbeit 2, 28/ 24
loved for that they be her kin, but for 2, 28/ 26
whose grace we besides be of kin. Whose honor 2, 28/ 29
own will, she would be as loath to suffer 2, 28/ 31
as any of us be. For if she have 2, 28/ 32
she thinketh some that be here, of whose faithful 2, 29/ 2
knoweth that they would be as sorry of his 2, 29/ 4
think, content that both be with her, if she 2, 29/ 6
may with their honor be. "Now, then, if she 2, 29/ 8
fear that he shall be fetched thence. For she 2, 29/ 16
doubt lest he might be fetched from her, is 2, 29/ 25
that let his brother be cast away under our 2, 29/ 31
not he that would be about to break them 2, 30/ 4
begin, I would not be he that should be 2, 30/ 5
be he that should be about to make them 2, 30/ 6
I will well there be some places of refuge 2, 30/ 13
of which these places be full, and which never 2, 30/ 15
few sanctuary men there be whom any favorable necessity 2, 30/ 24
what a sort there be commonly therein, of them 2, 30/ 26
abused as they now be, and so long have 2, 31/ 2
me ever they will be, while men be afeard 2, 31/ 3
will be, while men be afeard to set their 2, 31/ 4
hands to, it might be amended, with great thank 2, 31/ 18
neither is nor can be a sanctuary man. "A 2, 31/ 27
dare say would now be right angry with them 2, 32/ 19
breach of privilege, to be somewhat more homely with 2, 32/ 21
homely with them that be there sanctuary men indeed 2, 32/ 21
a sanctuary man should be delivered in payment of 2, 32/ 29
And if nobody may be taken out of sanctuary 2, 33/ 3
For therein, though it be a childish fear, yet 2, 33/ 7
it. But he can be no sanctuary man that 2, 33/ 12
not delivered, he should be fetched. Howbeit, they thought 2, 33/ 23
him, that he might be brought unto the King's 2, 34/ 17
and there should he be demeaned according to his 2, 34/ 19
wealth it were to be together, as well for 2, 34/ 25
yet a while, to be in the custody of 2, 35/ 3
And albeit there might be found others that would 2, 35/ 14
the Council not only be content, but also glad 2, 35/ 20
with your pleasure to be in such place as 2, 35/ 21
to have the child be with the mother but 2, 35/ 26
that occasion may sometimes be such that it should 2, 35/ 27
such that it should be more expedient to keep 2, 35/ 27
man doubteth he shall be best kept. And that 2, 36/ 22
anything why they should be in jeopardy?" "Nay, verily 2, 36/ 26
Nor why they should be in prison, neither -- 2, 36/ 27
-- as they now be! But it is, I 2, 36/ 28
neither was nor could be any manner jeopardy. "Whereby 2, 37/ 2
King? And how far be they off? -- if 2, 37/ 6
mind that he shall be where I am till 2, 37/ 9
the farther that you be to deliver him, the 2, 37/ 12
deliver him, the farther be other men to suffer 2, 37/ 13
convey him. And many be there that think that 2, 37/ 14
him sure, if he be not sure in this 2, 37/ 30
lacketh a playfellow' -- be ye sure! I pray 2, 38/ 13
though there could none be found to play with 2, 38/ 15
as young as they be could not play but 2, 38/ 18
serve. And if examples be sufficient to obtain privilege 2, 39/ 7
in which we now be (and which is now 2, 39/ 10
my son's palace may be as great safeguard to 2, 39/ 22
more, but whosoever he be that breaketh this holy 2, 40/ 3
procure her son to be delivered into his hands 2, 40/ 22
that he should incontinent be taken thence; and to 2, 40/ 28
which she thought to be now beset in such 2, 41/ 2
that he could not be conveyed out untaken -- 2, 41/ 3
fortune her fear to be false, so well she 2, 41/ 5
feared lest they might be deceived, so was she 2, 41/ 9
assured they would not be corrupted. Then thought she 2, 41/ 10
not also but there be some abroad so deadly 2, 41/ 21
And may the nephews be sure of their uncle 2, 41/ 27
other's defense while they be asunder, and each of 2, 41/ 28
one safe and both be sure; and nothing for 2, 41/ 30
more perilous than to be both in one place 2, 41/ 30
the world. Faithful ye be -- that wot I 2, 42/ 1
I know well you be wise. Power and strength 2, 42/ 2
I fear too much, be you well ware that 2, 42/ 7
the young king would be careful for their deaths 2, 43/ 15
him if he should be against him -- and 2, 43/ 24
he believed could not be avoided, he bent himself 2, 43/ 32
common mischief could not be amended, he would turn 2, 43/ 34
all should not long be well, though they neither 2, 44/ 24
to no good to be too much attendant about 2, 45/ 3
thence, never can there be thing once minded that 2, 45/ 17
me but it should be in mine ears ere 2, 45/ 18
he that there could be none harm toward him 2, 46/ 3
that induced him to be partner and one special 2, 46/ 25
whom this question should be meant, of which every 2, 47/ 25
them thought he might be boldest with him, answered 2, 47/ 27
they were worthy to be punished as heinous traitors 2, 47/ 28
assent before devised to be beheaded at Pomfret this 2, 48/ 4
should the same day be beheaded at London. Then 2, 48/ 6
so heinously done, they be worthy heinous punishment. "What 2, 48/ 24
a longer would not be suffered, the Protector made 2, 49/ 15
night that they should be out of danger ere 2, 50/ 9
not that we might be as likely to make 2, 50/ 15
-- or if any be, it is rather in 2, 50/ 19
him, and pray him be merry and have no 2, 50/ 23
I well; and thanked be God they got no 2, 52/ 3
and should that day be beheaded at Pomfret -- 2, 52/ 7
with a proclamation to be made through the city 2, 53/ 12
their humility content to be nameless and to forbear 2, 56/ 11
that she delighted to be sued unto and to 2, 56/ 22
wanton women and wealthy be not always covetous. I 2, 56/ 24
slight a thing to be written of and set 2, 56/ 27
the more worthy to be remembered in how much 2, 56/ 30
in their times, which be now famous only by 2, 57/ 2
much less, albeit they be much less remembered because 2, 57/ 4
manner of order, to be beheaded, and without other 2, 58/ 1
itself so heinous, might be first broken to the 2, 58/ 11
wise that it might be well taken. To this 2, 58/ 12
they thought meet to be trusted, likely to be 2, 58/ 13
be trusted, likely to be induced to that part 2, 58/ 14
which the people should be content to depose the 2, 59/ 16
in that point could be none other color but 2, 59/ 26
would that point should be less, and more favorably 2, 59/ 29
that the matter should be touched aslope, craftily, as 2, 59/ 30
that would he should be openly declared, and enforced 2, 59/ 33
and pretext whereof cannot be well perceived but if 2, 59/ 34
King that she might be restored unto such small 2, 60/ 30
herself too simple to be his wife, so thought 2, 61/ 24
herself too good to be his concubine. The King 2, 61/ 24
been wont elsewhere to be so stiffly said nay 2, 61/ 26
there was nothing to be misliked, yet was there 2, 62/ 17
but that it might be found in divers others 2, 62/ 18
doth in dignity, to be defouled with bigamy in 2, 62/ 28
thing, ought rather to be made for the respect 2, 63/ 6
all the parties could be contented, than to marry 2, 63/ 17
hath besides, if he be wived against his appetite 2, 63/ 21
quoth he, "but there be, as ye say, others 2, 63/ 25
ye say, others that be in every point comparable 2, 63/ 26
of a wife rather be ruled by his eye 2, 63/ 32
guardian! I would not be a king with that 2, 64/ 1
us is likely to be barren. And therefore, madam 2, 64/ 12
madam, I pray you be content; I trust in 2, 64/ 13
him, ere he could be able to resist, that 2, 65/ 16
a king than to be a king. But nothing 2, 66/ 1
that it could not be lost -- but by 2, 66/ 7
King Edward's children to be bastards. But that invention 2, 66/ 12
they were sure to be compelled to no larger 2, 66/ 14
light, the rightful inheritors be restored and the bastard 2, 67/ 3
up ere it can be rooted deep. And when 2, 67/ 5
we bear you, we be come to break unto 2, 69/ 12
-- that thing we be come hither to bring 2, 69/ 19
substance of goods to be lashed out among unthrifts 2, 69/ 30
by name, since there be, I doubt not, many 2, 70/ 29
most abiding. And yet be ye the people whom 2, 72/ 21
is that it so be. I am not so 2, 73/ 2
was full unmeet to be matched with his, and 2, 73/ 19
which things shall not be spoken for me, as 2, 73/ 25
it well, he will be loath to take upon 2, 74/ 12
which albeit he will be loath, as I have 2, 74/ 22
this, that these people be so still?" "Sir," quoth 2, 75/ 7
been accustomed there to be spoken unto "but by 2, 75/ 20
thing in which to be partners is your weal 2, 76/ 7
or other: whether you be minded as all the 2, 76/ 9
nobles of the realm be -- to have this 2, 76/ 10
prince, now Protector, to be your king -- or 2, 76/ 10
obtained they durst not be bold to move him 2, 78/ 1
wherewith he ought to be grieved. When the Duke 2, 78/ 9
by them alleged to be true, yet such entire 2, 78/ 26
well-known, it should peradventure be thought that it were 2, 78/ 32
he was and would be content to live; and 2, 79/ 5
of new intended to be, were now, partly by 2, 79/ 10
contrary, which they would be loath to hear, then 2, 79/ 23
so set (whereof we be very sorry) that they 2, 79/ 30
for most effectual: we be content, and agree favorably 2, 80/ 4
and said, "All must be done in good order 2, 80/ 25
the manner sake not be acknown what they know 2, 80/ 26
that he purposeth to be one, and though he 2, 80/ 28
And yet must he be twice asked whether he 2, 80/ 29
asked whether he will be bishop or no, and 2, 80/ 30
said that these matters be kings' games -- as 2, 81/ 6
In which poor men be but the lookers-on. And 2, 81/ 8
And they that wise be, will meddle no farther 2, 81/ 8
long deadly hated, should be brought then before him 2, 81/ 33
hard but it should be true. King Richard, after 2, 83/ 7
to them, "What, sirs? Be ye in bed so 2, 84/ 18
devised that they should be murdered in their beds 2, 85/ 11
lying still -- to be thoroughly dead, they laid 2, 85/ 26
in good possibility to be hanged ere he die 2, 87/ 3
covert manner he might be admitted to the presence 2, 88/ 7
other folk voided, to be brought unto him in 2, 88/ 10
he would make him be carried. Whereupon he rode 2, 89/ 20
between the twain, to be bold to say whatsoever 2, 92/ 19
peril, though the word be without fault -- forasmuch 2, 92/ 28
as it shall not be taken as the party 2, 92/ 29