THANK..................3
be amended, with great thank of God and no 2, 31/ 19
cause have we to thank God that this noble 2, 74/ 19
it, could deserve but thank. And yet taken as 2, 93/ 15
 
 THANKED................5
all is (God be thanked) quiet, and likely right 2, 13/ 10
well enough. And he thanked the Duke, and prayed 2, 20/ 5
remember I well; and thanked be God they got 2, 52/ 3
made him, but also thanked them for the love 2, 79/ 3
The Bishop right humbly thanked him, and said, "In 2, 92/ 27
 
 THANKS.................3
wrought his will, and, thanks be to his grace 2, 15/ 14
who gave him great thanks and, as some say 2, 86/ 2
messenger, sent back with thanks and some secret instruction 2, 88/ 14
 
 THAT...................814
King Edward, of that name the fourth, after 2, 3/ 1
name the fourth, after that he had lived fifty 2, 3/ 1
leaving much fair issue: that is to wit, Edward 2, 3/ 6
of close nuns; Anne, that was after honorably married 2, 3/ 12
needs be other's enemy) that there was never any 2, 3/ 22
of the tempestuous world that followed, highly toward him 2, 4/ 2
the displeasure of those that bore him grudge for 2, 4/ 3
in effect quenched, in that that many of them 2, 4/ 5
effect quenched, in that that many of them were 2, 4/ 5
without violence, and, over that, in his latter days 2, 4/ 25
is the only thing that withdraweth the hearts of 2, 5/ 2
obtained Berwick. And albeit that all the time of 2, 5/ 7
courteous and so familiar, that no part of his 2, 5/ 8
was more esteemed, yet that condition in the end 2, 5/ 9
increased, so far forth that in the summer, the 2, 5/ 13
the summer, the last that ever he saw, His 2, 5/ 13
freely into the city, that no one thing in 2, 5/ 18
this noble king in that time in which his 2, 5/ 22
all the bands broken that bind man and man 2, 6/ 5
of man this was, that could find in his 2, 6/ 11
so far forth advanced that, King Henry's blood (albeit 2, 6/ 17
is for truth reported that the Duchess, his mother 2, 7/ 23
ado in her travail that she could not be 2, 7/ 24
of him uncut, and that he came into the 2, 7/ 25
the truth, or else that nature changed her course 2, 7/ 28
men constantly say; and that without commandment or knowledge 2, 8/ 18
if he had intended that thing, have appointed that 2, 8/ 20
that thing, have appointed that butcherly office to some 2, 8/ 20
wise men also ween that his drift, covertly conveyed 2, 8/ 22
more faintly than he that were heartily minded to 2, 8/ 25
his wealth. And they that thus deem, think that 2, 8/ 26
that thus deem, think that he long time in 2, 8/ 26
be king in case that the king his brother 2, 8/ 27
whose life he looked that evil diet should shorten 2, 8/ 28
young. And they deem that for this intent he 2, 9/ 1
by credible information learned: that the self night in 2, 9/ 7
he showed unto Pottier that King Edward was departed 2, 9/ 11
toward him, anything knew that he such thing purposed 2, 9/ 15
this history. Were it that the Duke of Gloucester 2, 9/ 20
man in courage of that he never intended), certain 2, 9/ 24
intended), certain is it that he contrived their destruction 2, 9/ 25
authority, he now thought that their division should be 2, 10/ 1
he could; and those that could not be won 2, 10/ 6
thing was he certain: that if his intent were 2, 10/ 8
in his life, albeit that this dissension between his 2, 10/ 10
strength so sore enfeebled that he despaired all recovery 2, 10/ 15
nothing less mistrusted than that that happened, yet well 2, 10/ 17
less mistrusted than that that happened, yet well foreseeing 2, 10/ 17
happened, yet well foreseeing that many harms might grow 2, 10/ 17
of them before him that were at variance, and 2, 10/ 26
him, and also for that she thought him secretly 2, 11/ 2
sore, as well for that the King had made 2, 11/ 4
gifts which he received, that they looked for. When 2, 11/ 7
Which, if they should (that God forbid) find you 2, 11/ 16
For it sufficeth not that all you love them 2, 11/ 20
each laboreth to break that the other maketh, and 2, 11/ 25
God send, then they that by evil means before 2, 12/ 1
out of favor; so that ever, at length, evil 2, 12/ 3
ye have of love. That we be all men 2, 12/ 8
we be all men, that we be Christian men 2, 12/ 9
move you than his that is by and by 2, 12/ 11
going to the place that they all preach of 2, 12/ 11
desire you to remember: that the one part of 2, 12/ 12
of Christ's church bear that weight with us that 2, 12/ 15
that weight with us that would God they did 2, 12/ 16
consanguinity. Our Lord forbid that you love together the 2, 12/ 18
for the self cause that you ought to love 2, 12/ 19
the better! And yet that happeneth. And nowhere find 2, 12/ 19
God's blessed Lady" -- that was ever his oath 2, 13/ 4
so great hurt before, that we eftsoons fall not 2, 13/ 8
eftsoons fall not in that occasion again. Now be 2, 13/ 9
in these last words that ever I look to 2, 13/ 17
all, for the love that you have ever borne 2, 13/ 18
me, for the love that I have ever borne 2, 13/ 19
you, for the love that our Lord beareth to 2, 13/ 20
none was there present that could refrain from weeping 2, 13/ 26
thither, to the end that the authority of his 2, 14/ 7
next about the Prince. That drift by the Queen 2, 14/ 16
their destruction, and upon that ground set the foundation 2, 14/ 18
writing and secret messengers, that it neither was reason 2, 14/ 22
wise to be suffered that the young king, their 2, 14/ 23
be to his grace, that peril is past. Howbeit 2, 15/ 15
foe, or to think that an hoverly kindness, suddenly 2, 15/ 22
soon set afire them that were of themselves easy 2, 15/ 27
the Duke of Gloucester: that they would utterly remove 2, 16/ 1
Duke of Gloucester, understanding that the lords which at 2, 16/ 4
the lords which at that time were about the 2, 16/ 5
power of their friends that it should be hard 2, 16/ 6
brought in the mind that it neither were need 2, 16/ 12
of all the hurt that thereof should ensue -- 2, 16/ 24
the wite, and say that they had unwisely, and 2, 16/ 27
the amity and peace that the king her husband 2, 16/ 28
the King; and over that, the Duke of Gloucester 2, 17/ 3
friends there so lovingly, that they, nothing earthly mistrusting 2, 17/ 5
So was there made that night much friendly cheer 2, 17/ 15
while. But incontinent after that they were openly with 2, 17/ 17
keys of the inn, that none should pass forth 2, 17/ 29
certain of their folk, that should send back again 2, 18/ 2
to return any man that were gotten out of 2, 18/ 3
to be the first that should that day attend 2, 18/ 6
the first that should that day attend upon the 2, 18/ 6
King's Highness out of that town: thus bore they 2, 18/ 7
with him and say that he intended to set 2, 18/ 20
him in ward, and, that done, forthwith went to 2, 18/ 25
depart forward, to leave that lodging for them, because 2, 18/ 29
by his mother, saying that he, with the Lord 2, 19/ 9
accomplishing whereof, they said that the Lord Marquis had 2, 19/ 13
Council at London; saving that somewhat they must say 2, 19/ 17
and my brother here, that they be innocent of 2, 19/ 20
the midnight following, and that in the sorest wise 2, 20/ 19
in the sorest wise: that the King her son 2, 20/ 19
infortune, damning the time that ever she dissuaded the 2, 20/ 27
from Westminster. And for that he showed his servants 2, 21/ 6
he showed his servants that he had tidings of 2, 21/ 6
of so great importance that his master gave him 2, 21/ 7
Of whom he heard that these dukes were gone 2, 21/ 10
sendeth Your Lordship word that there is no fear 2, 21/ 12
For he assureth you that all shall be well 2, 21/ 13
yet drew to them that helped to carry a 2, 21/ 25
he could, showing her that he trusted the matter 2, 21/ 30
took it for, and that he was put in 2, 22/ 2
is one of them that laboreth to destroy me 2, 22/ 4
in like wise as that noble prince your husband 2, 22/ 9
of Gloucester's servants, watching that no man should go 2, 22/ 15
and many also for that they reckoned this demeanor 2, 22/ 24
of York -- fearing that it would be ascribed 2, 22/ 28
to his overmuch lightness that he so suddenly had 2, 22/ 29
the lords to believe that the Duke of Gloucester 2, 23/ 4
to his prince, and that the Lord Rivers and 2, 23/ 5
the King's jeopardy; and that they were also in 2, 23/ 11
he advised them beware: that they judged not the 2, 23/ 16
were coming up -- that they might peradventure bring 2, 23/ 20
far out of joint that it should never be 2, 23/ 21
the authority be on that side where the King 2, 23/ 24
appeased, but especially by that that the dukes of 2, 23/ 27
but especially by that that the dukes of Gloucester 2, 23/ 27
to be blown about that these lords and knights 2, 23/ 31
realm, to the end that themselves would alone demean 2, 24/ 2
carts of their stuff that were taken (among which 2, 24/ 4
the breaking up of that household must needs either 2, 24/ 6
the barrels of harnesses that these traitors had privily 2, 24/ 9
with." This device, albeit that it made the matter 2, 24/ 10
more unlikely (well perceiving that the intenders of such 2, 24/ 11
all semblance of lowliness, that from the great obloquy 2, 24/ 25
in so great trust that at the Council next 2, 24/ 26
and his realm; so that, were it destiny or 2, 24/ 29
the best-learned men, undoubtedly, that England had in his 2, 25/ 7
kept still their offices that they had before. Now 2, 25/ 10
all were it so that the Protector so sore 2, 25/ 10
for the finishing of that he had begun that 2, 25/ 11
that he had begun that thought every day a 2, 25/ 12
hand -- well witting that if he deposed the 2, 25/ 14
he proposed unto them that it was an heinous 2, 25/ 19
toward the King's Councillors, that she should keep in 2, 25/ 21
brother with him; and that by her done to 2, 25/ 27
with the King's brother that by the assent of 2, 25/ 30
familiar conversation of those that be neither far under 2, 26/ 10
think no man thinketh that loveth the King), let 2, 26/ 14
King), let him consider that sometimes without small things 2, 26/ 15
and of all us that be about His Grace 2, 26/ 17
words walk far) -- that the King's brother should 2, 26/ 19
every man will ween that no man will so 2, 26/ 21
dear nephew -- considered that thereby shall be ceased 2, 27/ 3
and the hurts avoided that thereof might ensue, and 2, 27/ 5
upon her own will, that neither his wise and 2, 27/ 7
fetch him out of that prison and bring him 2, 27/ 10
and so honorably treated that all the world shall 2, 27/ 12
and her reproach, perceive that it was only malice 2, 27/ 13
malice, frowardness, or folly that caused her to keep 2, 27/ 14
mine own will but that I shall be ready 2, 27/ 17
all the Council affirmed that the motion was good 2, 27/ 19
honorable, and a thing that should cease great murmur 2, 27/ 21
of the spiritualty present, that it were not in 2, 27/ 28
would be a thing that should turn to the 2, 27/ 29
if the privilege of that holy place should now 2, 27/ 31
Peter's cope to show) that from that time hitherward 2, 28/ 6
to show) that from that time hitherward was there 2, 28/ 6
so undevout a king that durst that sacred place 2, 28/ 7
a king that durst that sacred place violate, or 2, 28/ 7
so holy a bishop that durst it presume to 2, 28/ 8
of York, "God forbid that any man should, for 2, 28/ 10
immunity and liberty of that sacred sanctuary, that hath 2, 28/ 11
of that sacred sanctuary, that hath been the safeguard 2, 28/ 11
do it. I trust that she shall be with 2, 28/ 14
And if it happen that I bring it not 2, 28/ 16
forth do my best that ye shall all well 2, 28/ 17
shall all well perceive that no lack of my 2, 28/ 17
here is no man that will be at war 2, 28/ 23
the less loved for that they be her kin 2, 28/ 26
no cause to think that we should hate the 2, 28/ 28
than she thinketh some that be here, of whose 2, 29/ 2
verily believeth and knoweth that they would be as 2, 29/ 4
all, I think, content that both be with her 2, 29/ 6
is easy to perceive that frowardness letteth her, and 2, 29/ 11
But go to, suppose that she fear -- as 2, 29/ 12
cast such fond doubts that she fear his hurt 2, 29/ 15
then will she fear that he shall be fetched 2, 29/ 16
she will soon think that if men were set 2, 29/ 20
it not likely enough that she shall send him 2, 29/ 26
might happen to bring that to pass (as it 2, 29/ 29
the world would say that we were a wise 2, 29/ 30
councillors about a king, that let his brother be 2, 29/ 31
since the privileges of that place and others like 2, 30/ 3
I am not he that would be about to 2, 30/ 4
would not be he that should be about to 2, 30/ 5
not say nay but that it is a deed 2, 30/ 7
a deed of pity that such men as the 2, 30/ 8
we not the sanctuaries that God appointed in the 2, 30/ 19
misfortune draw him to that deed, a pardon serveth 2, 30/ 21
malicious heinous traitors! And that in two places especially 2, 30/ 29
it: weigh the good that they do with the 2, 30/ 31
do with the hurt that cometh of them, and 2, 30/ 31
so long have been that I fear me ever 2, 31/ 3
and wealth, out of that place in which he 2, 31/ 26
defend the body of that man that standeth in 2, 31/ 28
body of that man that standeth in danger abroad 2, 31/ 29
any one place. For that privilege hath every place 2, 32/ 1
to do another wrong? That no man unlawfully take 2, 32/ 3
man unlawfully take hurt, that liberty the king, the 2, 32/ 4
place, and maketh, to that regard, for every man 2, 32/ 5
must ask it himself that must have it. And 2, 32/ 14
right angry with them that keep him there. And 2, 32/ 19
more homely with them that be there sanctuary men 2, 32/ 21
place such a privilege that it shall discharge a 2, 32/ 25
to pay." And with that, divers of the clergy 2, 32/ 27
divers of the clergy that were present, whether they 2, 32/ 27
they thought, agreed plainly that by the law of 2, 32/ 28
taken out of sanctuary that saith he will bide 2, 33/ 3
And as simple as that sample is, yet is 2, 33/ 5
our case than in that. For therein, though it 2, 33/ 6
be no sanctuary man that neither hath wisdom to 2, 33/ 12
in jeopardy. And he that taketh one out of 2, 33/ 17
good, I say plainly that he breaketh no sanctuary 2, 33/ 18
babe, condescended in effect that if he were not 2, 33/ 22
all manner of rumor, that the Lord Cardinal should 2, 33/ 24
of his honor, or that she should by presence 2, 33/ 30
of so many perceive that this errand was not 2, 33/ 30
or were it for that the Protector intended not 2, 33/ 31
man alone, or else that if she finally were 2, 34/ 1
keep him, some of that company had haply secret 2, 34/ 1
Cardinal showed unto her that it was thought unto 2, 34/ 7
unto the whole Council that her keeping of the 2, 34/ 8
the King's brother in that place was the thing 2, 34/ 9
And he showed her that the Council therefore had 2, 34/ 16
the delivery of him, that he might be brought 2, 34/ 17
his liberty, out of that place which they reckoned 2, 34/ 18
succor to her friends that were in distress, and 2, 34/ 22
in distress, and over that (which he wist well 2, 34/ 22
seem light, well pondering that their youth without recreation 2, 34/ 27
estates so meetly in that point for any of 2, 34/ 29
say not nay but that it were very convenient 2, 34/ 32
it were very convenient that this gentleman whom ye 2, 35/ 1
which besides his infancy, that also needeth good looking 2, 35/ 5
amended than well recovered, that I dare put no 2, 35/ 8
but myself only, considering that there is, as physicians 2, 35/ 9
peril in the recidivation that was in the first 2, 35/ 11
might be found others that would haply do their 2, 35/ 14
yet is there none that either knoweth better how 2, 35/ 15
order him than I that so long have kept 2, 35/ 16
than his own mother that bore him." "No man 2, 35/ 17
quoth the Cardinal, "but that Your Grace were of 2, 35/ 18
content, but also glad that ye were, if it 2, 35/ 20
they yet more convenient that the Duke of York 2, 35/ 23
with the mother but that occasion may sometimes be 2, 35/ 27
may sometimes be such that it should be more 2, 35/ 27
in this well appeareth: that at such time as 2, 35/ 28
case I marvel greatly that my Lord Protector is 2, 35/ 34
honor, and theirs also, that he bideth in this 2, 36/ 20
be best kept. And that is here, while I 2, 36/ 22
I fear lest those that have not letted to 2, 36/ 29
to the other lord that he should harp no 2, 36/ 32
harp no more upon that string. And then said 2, 36/ 33
he to the Queen that he nothing doubted but 2, 36/ 34
he nothing doubted but that those lords of her 2, 36/ 34
Whereby should I trust that?" quoth the Queen. "In 2, 37/ 3
quoth the Queen. "In that I am guiltless? As 2, 37/ 3
they were guilty! In that I am with their 2, 37/ 4
for my sake! In that I am so near 2, 37/ 5
they off? -- if that would help, as God 2, 37/ 6
my son, I mind that he shall be where 2, 37/ 8
I assure you, for that I see some men 2, 37/ 10
he, "and the farther that you be to deliver 2, 37/ 12
And many be there that think that he can 2, 37/ 15
be there that think that he can have no 2, 37/ 15
tender zeal to him that he feareth nothing but 2, 37/ 22
escape him? Thinketh he that I would send him 2, 37/ 23
tyrant yet so devilish that durst presume to break 2, 37/ 31
goodly gloss by which that place that may defend 2, 38/ 4
by which that place that may defend a thief 2, 38/ 4
protector!) -- troweth he that I perceive not whereunto 2, 38/ 9
It is not honorable that the Duke bide here' 2, 38/ 11
comfortable for them both that he were with his 2, 38/ 12
better playfellows than him that maketh so high a 2, 38/ 14
if his brother -- that hath no lust to 2, 38/ 16
-- I say he that against my will taketh 2, 38/ 25
not the first time that I have taken sanctuary 2, 39/ 15
And I pray God that my son's palace may 2, 39/ 21
in the Protector's hands, that hath his brother already 2, 39/ 28
but whosoever he be that breaketh this holy sanctuary 2, 40/ 3
The Lord Cardinal, perceiving that the Queen waxed ever 2, 40/ 8
farther off, and also that she began to kindle 2, 40/ 9
for a final conclusion, that he would no longer 2, 40/ 12
to move her in that matter, in which she 2, 40/ 18
in which she thought that he and all others 2, 40/ 19
they were so dull that they could nothing perceive 2, 40/ 20
ready at hand, so that she verily thought she 2, 40/ 26
keep him there, but that he should incontinent be 2, 40/ 27
in such places about that he could not be 2, 41/ 2
deliver him. And over that, of the Cardinal's faith 2, 41/ 7
enemies unto my blood that if they wist where 2, 41/ 22
have also had experience that the desire of a 2, 41/ 24
Faithful ye be -- that wot I well; and 2, 42/ 1
you, for the trust that his father put in 2, 42/ 5
and for the trust that I put in you 2, 42/ 6
put in you now: that as far as ye 2, 42/ 6
far as ye think that I fear too much 2, 42/ 7
be you well ware that you fear not as 2, 42/ 7
And he said, in that, of likelihood as he 2, 42/ 18
out of which after that day they never came 2, 42/ 22
-- although I know that many thought that this 2, 42/ 28
know that many thought that this duke was privy 2, 42/ 28
the Protector's friends said that the Duke was the 2, 42/ 31
of the Protector, deny that he ever opened his 2, 43/ 2
who declared unto him that the young king was 2, 43/ 11
his kinsfolk's sakes, and that if he were ever 2, 43/ 12
grievous unto him. And that with repenting the Duke 2, 43/ 16
destroy them all; and that it were no doubt 2, 43/ 21
new enterprise attempted. And that it was likely that 2, 43/ 22
that it was likely that as the Protector had 2, 43/ 22
against him -- and that, peradventure, from them whom 2, 43/ 25
men were then such that a man could not 2, 43/ 27
mind, brought him to that point that, where he 2, 43/ 29
him to that point that, where he had repented 2, 43/ 29
had repented the way that he had entered, yet 2, 43/ 30
went through, and determined that since the common mischief 2, 43/ 33
Then it was agreed that the Protector should have 2, 44/ 1
make him king, and that the Protector's only lawful 2, 44/ 2
the Duke's daughter, and that the Protector should grant 2, 44/ 3
have it seem. And that they might turn both 2, 44/ 10
realm, came thick to that solemnity. But the Protector 2, 44/ 14
and the Duke, after that that they had set 2, 44/ 15
the Duke, after that that they had set the 2, 44/ 15
nor wherefore: were it that before such great things 2, 44/ 25
-- or were it that some one man, haply 2, 44/ 27
made suit to them that had the doing, some 2, 45/ 1
their friends secretly warned that it might haply turn 2, 45/ 2
not common people only, that wave with the wind 2, 45/ 7
-- so far forth that the Lord Stanley, that 2, 45/ 10
that the Lord Stanley, that was after Earl of 2, 45/ 10
unto the Lord Hastings that he much misliked these 2, 45/ 12
be thing once minded that should sound amiss toward 2, 45/ 17
great pity was it that he had not had 2, 45/ 29
dissimulation only kept all that mischief up in whom 2, 45/ 30
for many ill signs that he saw -- which 2, 46/ 2
So surely thought he that there could be none 2, 46/ 3
harm toward him in that council intended where Catesby 2, 46/ 4
not, reported unto them that he found him so 2, 46/ 15
speak so terrible words, that he durst no further 2, 46/ 16
unto Catesby the mistrust that others began to have 2, 46/ 18
much the rather for that he trusted by his 2, 46/ 22
much of the rule that the Lord Hastings bore 2, 46/ 23
whereof was the allective that induced him to be 2, 46/ 25
Whereupon, soon after -- that is to wit, on 2, 46/ 27
then so near approached that the pageants and subtleties 2, 46/ 31
much victual killed therefor that afterward was cast away 2, 47/ 1
courteously and excusing himself that he had been from 2, 47/ 4
so long, saying merrily that he had been asleep 2, 47/ 5
he had been asleep that day. And after a 2, 47/ 5
to your pleasure as that." And therewith, in all 2, 47/ 9
they worthy to have, that compass and imagine the 2, 47/ 22
Lord Chamberlain, as he that for the love between 2, 47/ 26
him, answered and said that they were worthy to 2, 47/ 27
others affirmed the same. "That is," quoth he, "yonder 2, 47/ 29
lords were greatly abashed, that favored her. But the 2, 47/ 31
his mind better content that it was moved by 2, 47/ 32
his heart somewhat grudged that he was not before 2, 48/ 1
he was not aware that it was by others 2, 48/ 5
was by others devised that himself should the same 2, 48/ 5
see in what wise that sorceress and that other 2, 48/ 7
wise that sorceress and that other witch of her 2, 48/ 7
misgave them, well perceiving that this matter was but 2, 48/ 12
For well they wist that the Queen was too 2, 48/ 14
she most hated, as that concubine whom the King 2, 48/ 17
present but well knew that his harm was ever 2, 48/ 18
it is said, he that while forbore her of 2, 48/ 21
have so done; and that I will make good 2, 48/ 26
either the warnings of that he should have avoided 2, 49/ 25
or the tokens of that he could not avoid 2, 49/ 26
in which him thought that a boar with his 2, 50/ 3
both by the heads that the blood ran about 2, 50/ 4
impression in his heart that he was thoroughly determined 2, 50/ 7
yet the same night that they should be out 2, 50/ 9
why thinketh he not that we might be as 2, 50/ 15
his tusks, as folk that fled for some falsehood 2, 50/ 17
yet had I liefer that men should see it 2, 50/ 20
sure of the man that he wotteth of as 2, 50/ 24
Certain is it also that in the riding toward 2, 50/ 26
great misfortune. Now this that followeth was no warning 2, 50/ 32
of secret confederacy in that purpose -- a mean 2, 51/ 4
a mean man at that time, and now of 2, 51/ 4
you so long with that priest? You have no 2, 51/ 8
and so little mistrusted, that he was never merrier 2, 51/ 11
of their meeting in that place, he was put 2, 51/ 16
brother, in such wise that he was for the 2, 51/ 21
in the same place, that jeopardy so well past 2, 51/ 29
my lord," quoth he, "that remember I well; and 2, 52/ 3
and more shall shortly." That meant he by the 2, 52/ 6
of the Queen's kindred that were taken before and 2, 52/ 7
taken before and should that day be beheaded at 2, 52/ 7
wist, but nothing aware that the axe hung over 2, 52/ 8
lost his life, and that within two hours after 2, 52/ 15
to beguile, as he that of good heart and 2, 52/ 20
no man should ween that they would vouchsafe to 2, 52/ 29
upon their backs except that some sudden necessity had 2, 52/ 30
the Protector showed them that the Lord Chamberlain and 2, 52/ 31
ten of the clock that same forenoon; which sudden 2, 53/ 4
had God helped them that the mischief turned upon 2, 53/ 6
mischief turned upon them that would have done it 2, 53/ 7
the King's name, containing that the Lord Hastings with 2, 53/ 14
the Lord Chamberlain, as that he was an evil 2, 53/ 21
before his death; so that it was the less 2, 53/ 28
within two hours after that he was beheaded, and 2, 54/ 4
so long a process, that every child might well 2, 54/ 6
child might well perceive that it was prepared before 2, 54/ 6
haste, at adventure. So that upon the proclaiming thereof 2, 54/ 9
the proclaiming thereof, one that was schoolmaster of Paul's 2, 54/ 10
matter, said unto them that stood about him, "Here 2, 54/ 11
a merchant answered him that it was written by 2, 54/ 13
spoiled her of all that ever she had -- 2, 54/ 16
for the manner sake, that she went about to 2, 54/ 18
to bewitch him and that she was of counsel 2, 54/ 19
-- in conclusion, when that no color could fasten 2, 54/ 20
her charge the thing that herself could not deny 2, 54/ 22
herself could not deny, that all the world wist 2, 54/ 22
wist was true, and that nevertheless every man laughed 2, 54/ 22
suddenly so highly taken: that she was naught of 2, 54/ 24
before had most miss), that her great shame won 2, 55/ 1
much praise among those that were more amorous of 2, 55/ 2
many good folk, also, that hated her living and 2, 55/ 3
therein, when they considered that the Protector procured it 2, 55/ 5
was haply the thing that the more easily made 2, 55/ 12
honest man and one that could his good -- 2, 55/ 18
nothing in her body that you would have changed 2, 55/ 25
higher. Thus say they that knew her in her 2, 55/ 26
her youth, albeit some that now see her (for 2, 55/ 26
The King would say that he had three concubines 2, 56/ 6
his grace. For many that had highly offended, she 2, 56/ 18
rich -- either for that she was content with 2, 56/ 21
well done, or for that she delighted to be 2, 56/ 22
the King, or for that wanton women and wealthy 2, 56/ 23
they shall especially think that haply shall esteem her 2, 56/ 29
esteem her only by that they now see her 2, 56/ 29
seeking-to with all those that those days had business 2, 57/ 1
at this day living, that at this day had 2, 57/ 12
Protector and his council that the self day in 2, 57/ 15
fore-remembered lords and knights that were taken from the 2, 57/ 19
enterprises, as a man that had been long secret 2, 57/ 23
to the people about that they were traitors (not 2, 57/ 27
earthly guilt but only that they were good men 2, 58/ 2
then thought the Protector that -- while men mused 2, 58/ 5
people in such wise that it might be well 2, 58/ 12
to be induced to that part, and able to 2, 58/ 14
the people; but after that, never. Of these two 2, 58/ 26
full of tedious flattery that no man's ears could 2, 59/ 1
so lost his voice that he was fain to 2, 59/ 2
doubt, and many think, that Penker was not of 2, 59/ 8
But certain is it that Doctor Shaa was of 2, 59/ 11
beginning, so far forth that they determined that he 2, 59/ 12
forth that they determined that he should first break 2, 59/ 12
the weighty of all that invention rested in this 2, 59/ 18
invention rested in this: that they should allege bastardy 2, 59/ 19
children, or both, so that he should seem disabled 2, 59/ 20
them both; for in that point could be none 2, 59/ 26
color but to pretend that his own mother was 2, 59/ 26
But nevertheless he would that point should be less 2, 59/ 28
plain and directly, but that the matter should be 2, 59/ 30
though men spared in that point to speak all 2, 59/ 31
point, concerning the bastardy that they devised to surmise 2, 59/ 32
King Edward's children -- that would he should be 2, 59/ 33
King Edward's marriage. After that King Edward IV had 2, 60/ 2
so toward and willing that he speedily, according to 2, 60/ 10
conclusion. Now happed it that in the mean season 2, 60/ 12
after his queen), at that time a widow -- 2, 60/ 14
knight upon the field that he had on Shrove 2, 60/ 21
little while enjoyed he that knighthood, for he was 2, 60/ 23
suit unto the King that she might be restored 2, 60/ 30
virtuously denied him. But that did she so wisely 2, 61/ 16
words so well set, that she rather kindled his 2, 61/ 17
her so greatly increased that she durst somewhat the 2, 61/ 21
she showed him plainly that as she wist herself 2, 61/ 23
her constancy, as he that had not been wont 2, 61/ 25
her continence and chastity that he set her virtue 2, 61/ 27
his other friends, and that in such manner as 2, 61/ 33
so sore moved therewith that she dissuaded the marriage 2, 62/ 1
she possibly might, alleging that it was his honor 2, 62/ 2
his possessions -- and that he could not well 2, 62/ 5
well otherwise do, standing that the Earl of Warwick 2, 62/ 6
And she said also that it was not princely 2, 62/ 9
were a rich man that would marry his maid 2, 62/ 11
nothing so excellent but that it might be found 2, 62/ 18
found in divers others that were more meetly," quoth 2, 62/ 18
majesty of a prince, that ought as nigh to 2, 62/ 27
play, merrily, as he that wist himself out of 2, 63/ 3
albeit he would gladly that she should take it 2, 63/ 4
satisfy her, he said that albeit marriage, being a 2, 63/ 6
yet nevertheless him seemed that this marriage even worldly 2, 63/ 9
more hearty favor in that he disdained not to 2, 63/ 12
and pleasure of this that he had already. For 2, 63/ 19
a man of all that ever he hath besides 2, 63/ 20
as ye say, others that be in every point 2, 63/ 26
I let not them that like them to wed 2, 63/ 27
more is it reason that it mislike any man 2, 63/ 27
it mislike any man that I marry where it 2, 63/ 28
And I am sure that my cousin of Warwick 2, 63/ 28
little to grudge at that I love, nor is 2, 63/ 31
so unreasonable to look that I should in choice 2, 63/ 32
I were a ward that were bound to marry 2, 63/ 33
be a king with that condition -- to forbear 2, 64/ 1
have already title by that means to so much 2, 64/ 5
in one man's days. That she is a widow 2, 64/ 10
us hath a proof that neither of us is 2, 64/ 12
forth a young prince that shall please you. And 2, 64/ 16
never wist it yet that it was forbidden a 2, 64/ 19
King so set thereon that she could not pull 2, 64/ 21
highly she disdained it that, under pretext of her 2, 64/ 22
and rather to help that he should marry one 2, 64/ 23
discharge of her conscience, that the King was sure 2, 64/ 28
made in the matter that either the bishops durst 2, 64/ 30
sent for. And albeit that she was by the 2, 64/ 34
good comfort to affirm that she was ensured unto 2, 65/ 1
the truth, she confessed that they were never ensured 2, 65/ 2
loving words unto her that she verily hoped he 2, 65/ 4
have married her. And that if it had not 2, 65/ 4
it was clearly perceived that there was none impediment 2, 65/ 7
and her crowned queen that was his enemy's wife 2, 65/ 10
took it so highly that his embassage was deluded 2, 65/ 14
his embassage was deluded that for very anger and 2, 65/ 14
be able to resist, that he was fain to 2, 65/ 16
Edward deposed -- and that muchwhat by the power 2, 65/ 29
with all the people, that he made kings and 2, 65/ 31
other great estates of that party, and so stably 2, 66/ 4
attained the crown again that he peaceably enjoyed it 2, 66/ 5
such plight left it that it could not be 2, 66/ 6
to be bastards. But that invention, simple as it 2, 66/ 12
and his council concluded that this Doctor Shaa should 2, 66/ 16
signify to the people that neither King Edward himself 2, 66/ 18
Duchess, their mother. And that, also, Dame Elizabeth Lucy 2, 66/ 21
all his children bastards that were begotten upon the 2, 66/ 23
non agent radices altas," that is to say, "Bastard 2, 66/ 28
shown the great grace that God giveth and secretly 2, 66/ 29
matrimony, then declared he that commonly those children lacked 2, 66/ 31
commonly those children lacked that grace, and for the 2, 66/ 31
God always so provideth that it continueth not in 2, 67/ 2
Parliament. Then showed he that his very right heir 2, 67/ 11
For he declared then that King Edward was never 2, 67/ 13
children bastards. And besides that, neither King Edward himself 2, 67/ 22
of Clarence among those that were secret in the 2, 67/ 23
noble duke, as those that by their favors more 2, 67/ 25
conditions he said also that King Edward was far 2, 67/ 27
Lord Protector, he said, "that very noble prince, that 2, 67/ 27
that very noble prince, that special pattern of knightly 2, 67/ 28
plain, express likeness of that noble duke." Now was 2, 67/ 32
was it before devised that in the speaking of 2, 67/ 33
sermonward, to the end that those words meeting with 2, 68/ 2
Richard! King Richard!" -- that it might have been 2, 68/ 5
have been after said that he was specially chosen 2, 68/ 6
and the Doctor, fearing that he should come ere 2, 68/ 9
from crying "King Richard!" that they stood as they 2, 68/ 25
he once asked one that had been his old 2, 68/ 29
him, all were it that his own conscience well 2, 68/ 30
conscience well showed him that they talked no good 2, 68/ 31
the other answered him that there was in every 2, 68/ 32
him to the heart that, within few days after 2, 68/ 33
haply knew the message that they brought. And there 2, 69/ 4
zeal and hearty favor that we bear you, we 2, 69/ 12
noble city. For why? That thing that we wot 2, 69/ 16
For why? That thing that we wot well ye 2, 69/ 16
and sorely longed for, that ye would have given 2, 69/ 17
given great good for, that ye would have gone 2, 69/ 18
far to fetch -- that thing we be come 2, 69/ 18
jeopardy. What thing is that? Certes, the surety of 2, 69/ 20
there of you all that would reckon himself lord 2, 69/ 24
or honorable charge. So that there was daily pilled 2, 69/ 29
unthrifts, so far forth that fifteenths sufficed not -- 2, 69/ 30
of "benevolence" had signified that every man should pay 2, 70/ 2
think, no man looketh that we should remember you 2, 70/ 12
though Burdet were forgotten, that was for a word 2, 70/ 14
Markham, then Chief Justice, that left his office rather 2, 70/ 17
he would assent to that judgment, than to the 2, 70/ 18
the dishonesty of those that, either for fear or 2, 70/ 19
fear or flattery, gave that judgment. What? Cook, your 2, 70/ 19
you either so negligent that he knoweth not, or 2, 70/ 24
not, or so forgetful that he remembereth not, or 2, 70/ 24
not, or so hard-hearted that he pitieth not, that 2, 70/ 25
that he pitieth not, that worshipful man's loss -- 2, 70/ 25
destruction -- only for that it happed those to 2, 70/ 27
not, many here present that either in themselves or 2, 70/ 29
with any of those that were at any time 2, 71/ 5
open war, which albeit that it is ever the 2, 71/ 10
in the king's days that dead is, God forgive 2, 71/ 15
blood of this realm that scarcely the half remaineth 2, 71/ 21
and spoiled by them that have been going to 2, 71/ 23
surer than war. So that no time was there 2, 71/ 24
For whom trusted he that mistrusted his own brother 2, 71/ 27
brother? Whom spared he that killed his own brother 2, 71/ 28
wot you well all: that whoso was best bore 2, 71/ 30
-- except unto those that made her their proctor 2, 71/ 33
among you. And in that point -- which in 2, 72/ 3
to speak of, saving that it is in vain 2, 72/ 4
to keep in counsel that thing that all men 2, 72/ 5
in counsel that thing that all men know -- 2, 72/ 5
wives and their children, that them were liefer to 2, 72/ 15
liefer to lose all that they have besides than 2, 72/ 15
And, all were it that with this and other 2, 72/ 16
-- as well for that among you is most 2, 72/ 18
such injuries as for that you were nearest at 2, 72/ 20
nearest at hand, since that near hereabout was commonly 2, 72/ 20
-- not only for that the prince by this 2, 72/ 23
nations, but also for that ye, not without your 2, 72/ 27
acquitted, there is of that house that now, by 2, 72/ 30
is of that house that now, by God's grace 2, 72/ 30
I wot well, need that I rehearse you again 2, 72/ 33
I rehearse you again that ye have already heard 2, 73/ 1
already heard of him that can better tell it 2, 73/ 1
it. And reason is that it so be. I 2, 73/ 2
to look therefor -- that ye should reckon my 2, 73/ 3
cunning and so wise that no man better wotteth 2, 73/ 5
so good and virtuous that he would not say 2, 73/ 6
the right and title that the most excellent prince 2, 73/ 10
the same. For as that worshipful man groundly made 2, 73/ 14
-- whose blood, saving that he set his voluptuous 2, 73/ 18
it may well seem that marriage not well made 2, 73/ 21
man forbeareth to say that he knoweth, in avoiding 2, 73/ 26
I say, fore-remembered -- that is to wit, for 2, 73/ 29
prince the Lord Protector that it may like His 2, 74/ 9
mind and of body that shall come therewith to 2, 74/ 14
whosoever so well occupy that room as I dare 2, 74/ 15
no child's office. And that the great wise man 2, 74/ 16
puer est': "Woe is that realm that hath a 2, 74/ 18
Woe is that realm that hath a child to 2, 74/ 18
we to thank God that this noble personage, which 2, 74/ 19
to our petition in that behalf the more graciously 2, 74/ 23
said -- and looked that the people, whom he 2, 75/ 1
to him, with others that were about him privy 2, 75/ 5
about him privy to that matter, said unto them 2, 75/ 6
softly, "What meaneth this, that these people be so 2, 75/ 7
perceive you not well." "That shall we amend," quoth 2, 75/ 8
amend," quoth he, "if that will help." And by 2, 75/ 8
comely and so convenient, that every man much marveled 2, 75/ 12
every man much marveled that heard him, and thought 2, 75/ 12
heard him, and thought that they never had in 2, 75/ 13
wonder or fear, or that each looked that other 2, 75/ 14
or that each looked that other should speak first 2, 75/ 15
of all the people that stood before, but all 2, 75/ 16
with other partners of that counsel drew about the 2, 75/ 19
the Duke and said that the people had not 2, 75/ 19
they will answer." With that, the Recorder, called Fitzwilliam 2, 75/ 22
so newly come into that office that he never 2, 75/ 26
come into that office that he never had spoken 2, 75/ 26
and loath was with that matter to begin -- 2, 75/ 27
to the commons of that the Duke had twice 2, 75/ 28
so tempered his tale that he showed everything as 2, 75/ 29
to move you to that thing -- which peradventure 2, 76/ 3
so greatly needed but that the lords of this 2, 76/ 4
might have sufficed, saving that we such love bear 2, 76/ 5
much set by you, that we would not gladly 2, 76/ 6
do without you -- that thing in which to 2, 76/ 7
whisper among themselves secretly, that the voice was neither 2, 76/ 14
some apprentices and lads that thrust into the hall 2, 76/ 18
of joy. And they that stood before cast back 2, 76/ 21
quoth the Duke, "since that we perceive it is 2, 76/ 28
Grace so effectual report that we doubt not but 2, 76/ 30
commodity, we require ye that ye tomorrow go with 2, 76/ 32
some with glad semblance that were not very merry 2, 77/ 3
and some of those that came thither with the 2, 77/ 3
the Mayor and others, that they might thereby see 2, 77/ 21
besought him to vouchsafe that they might resort to 2, 77/ 24
person any part disclose, that at the last he 2, 77/ 26
behalf of them all, that His Grace would pardon 2, 77/ 31
to move him of that matter. In which albeit 2, 78/ 2
for the good mind that he bore them all 2, 78/ 7
to beseech His Grace that it would like him 2, 78/ 12
and less pain in that that never prince reigned 2, 78/ 22
less pain in that that never prince reigned upon 2, 78/ 22
reigned upon any people that were so glad to 2, 78/ 23
strangely thereat, and answered that all were it that 2, 78/ 25
that all were it that he partly knew the 2, 78/ 25
Edward and his children, that so much more regarded 2, 78/ 27
he was never desirous, that he could not find 2, 78/ 29
should peradventure be thought that it were his own 2, 78/ 32
than pleasure to him that so would so use 2, 79/ 1
use it as he that would not were not 2, 79/ 1
pardoned them the motion that they made him, but 2, 79/ 3
God) well begun, in that the malice of such 2, 79/ 9
of London. And after that, upon like pardon desired 2, 79/ 14
aloud unto the Protector that for a final conclusion 2, 79/ 16
for a final conclusion, that the realm was appointed 2, 79/ 16
them -- both for that they had so far 2, 79/ 18
had so far gone that it was now no 2, 79/ 18
to retreat, as for that they thought it for 2, 79/ 19
weal universal to take that way although they had 2, 79/ 19
find some other nobleman that would. These words much 2, 79/ 24
none other way but that either he must take 2, 79/ 27
Since we perceive well that all the realm is 2, 79/ 29
we be very sorry) that they will not suffer 2, 79/ 30
we well also perceive that no man is there 2, 79/ 32
so was he from that time called), and the 2, 80/ 18
manner of this dealing, that the matter was on 2, 80/ 21
other thereof before, when that themselves well wist there 2, 80/ 22
no man so dull that heard them but he 2, 80/ 23
he perceived well enough that all the matter was 2, 80/ 24
them. Howbeit, some excused that again and said, "All 2, 80/ 25
paying for his bulls, that he purposeth to be 2, 80/ 28
people know right well that he that playeth the 2, 81/ 1
right well that he that playeth the sultan is 2, 81/ 1
And so they said that these matters be kings' 2, 81/ 6
the lookers-on. And they that wise be, will meddle 2, 81/ 8
no farther. For they that sometimes step up and 2, 81/ 9
declared to the audience that he would take upon 2, 81/ 19
him the crown in that place -- there where 2, 81/ 20
-- because he considered that it was the chiefest 2, 81/ 21
-- to the intent that no man should hate 2, 81/ 25
him for fear, and that his deceitful clemency might 2, 81/ 26
made an open proclamation that he did put out 2, 81/ 29
mind all enmities, and that he there did openly 2, 81/ 30
And to the intent that he might show a 2, 81/ 31
proof thereof, he commanded that one Fogge, whom he 2, 81/ 32
saluted. For a mind that knoweth itself guilty is 2, 82/ 4
day of July. And that solemnity was furnished for 2, 82/ 10
with the selfsame provision that was appointed for the 2, 82/ 11
and the most righteous (that is to wit, his 2, 82/ 16
far come in question that some remain yet in 2, 82/ 20
or no. Not for that only that Perkin Warbeck 2, 82/ 22
Not for that only that Perkin Warbeck, by many 2, 82/ 22
those two, but for that also that all things 2, 82/ 25
but for that also that all things were in 2, 82/ 25
pretended and another meant, that there was nothing so 2, 82/ 27
and openly proved but that yet, for the common 2, 82/ 27
true mistrusted. Howbeit, concerning that opinion, with the occasions 2, 82/ 31
the Seventh, or percase that history of Perkin in 2, 83/ 2
not after every way that I have heard, but 2, 83/ 5
have heard, but after that way that I have 2, 83/ 5
but after that way that I have so heard 2, 83/ 5
he rode, to fulfill that thing which he before 2, 83/ 9
his mind gave him that, his nephews living, men 2, 83/ 11
men would not reckon that he could have right 2, 83/ 11
letter (and credence also) that the same Sir Robert 2, 83/ 18
Tower!), who plainly answered that he would never put 2, 83/ 20
such displeasure and thought, that the same night he 2, 83/ 23
a man trust? Those that I have brought up 2, 83/ 25
brought up myself, those that I had weened would 2, 83/ 25
on your pallet without, that, I dare well say 2, 83/ 28
thing were right hard that he would refuse" -- 2, 83/ 29
wise do him good that all the enemies he 2, 84/ 12
as the Protector left that name and took himself 2, 84/ 28
it showed unto him that he should not reign 2, 84/ 28
my kingdom." Then he that told him the tale 2, 85/ 3
of himself, but with that young babe his brother 2, 85/ 8
death delivered them of that wretchedness. For Sir James 2, 85/ 10
Sir James Tyrell devised that they should be murdered 2, 85/ 10
one of the four that kept them -- a 2, 85/ 12
hard unto their mouths, that within a while, smothered 2, 85/ 20
the bed. Which after that the wretches perceived -- 2, 85/ 23
as I have heard, that burying in so vile 2, 86/ 3
vile a corner, saying that he would have them 2, 86/ 4
king!) Whereupon they say that a priest of Sir 2, 86/ 6
is it, and well-known, that at such time as 2, 86/ 9
have learned of them that much knew and little 2, 86/ 14
dog. And the mischief that he took, within less 2, 87/ 7
years of the mischief that he did; and yet 2, 87/ 8
secret with his chamberers, that after this abominable deed 2, 87/ 11
Duke of Gloucester, desiring that in the most close 2, 88/ 6
master's recommendation, showed him that he had secretly sent 2, 88/ 11
him to show him that in this new world 2, 88/ 12
all his devices, till that after his coronation they 2, 89/ 3
highly conspired against him that a man would marvel 2, 89/ 5
man would marvel whereof that change grew. And surely 2, 89/ 6
have I heard say that the Duke, a little 2, 89/ 8
Protector conceived such indignation that he rejected the Duke's 2, 89/ 13
with hatred and mistrust that he never after could 2, 89/ 15
life, so far forth that when the Protector rode 2, 89/ 16
with evil will), and that notwithstanding, on the morrow 2, 89/ 20
him. And they say that ever after, continually, each 2, 89/ 23
and distrust of other that the Duke verily looked 2, 89/ 24
and what need in that green world the Protector 2, 90/ 4
suspicion of the tyrant) that either the Protector would 2, 90/ 6
And utterly men think that if King Richard had 2, 90/ 8
glory of another; so that I have heard, of 2, 90/ 11
have heard, of some that said they saw it 2, 90/ 11
said they saw it, that the Duke, at such 2, 90/ 11
way. But men say that he was of truth 2, 90/ 14
well at ease, and that both to King Richard 2, 90/ 14
of King Henry while that part was in wealth 2, 90/ 24
After which lost and that party utterly subdued, the 2, 91/ 1
ended them so godly that his death, with God's 2, 91/ 17
close within his bounds that he rather seemed him 2, 92/ 1
I ween, believe but that if the world would 2, 92/ 6
King Edward. But after that God had ordered him 2, 92/ 8
was never so mad that I would with a 2, 92/ 9
glad would have been that his child had succeeded 2, 92/ 11
labor to set up that God pulleth down. And 2, 92/ 13
there he left, saying that he had already meddled 2, 92/ 15
world, and would from that day meddle with his 2, 92/ 16
he would ween, and that himself intended to use 2, 92/ 22
think on Aesop's tale, that when the lion had 2, 93/ 2
the lion had proclaimed that on pain of death 2, 93/ 2
horned beast abide in that wood, one that had 2, 93/ 3
in that wood, one that had in his forehead 2, 93/ 3
great pace. The fox, that saw him run so 2, 93/ 4
whither he made all that haste; and he answered 2, 93/ 5
it is none horn that is in thine head 2, 93/ 9
No, marry," quoth he, "that wot I well enough 2, 93/ 9
it did, the thing that I was about to 2, 93/ 14
was about to wish that to those good abilities 2, 93/ 21