TIMES..................3
men were, in their times, which be now famous 2, 57/ 2
enemy's wife and many times had prayed full heartily 2, 65/ 11
all which things in times past ye stood evermore 2, 69/ 23
 
 TITLE..................11
And we have already title by that means to 2, 64/ 5
Protector," and declared the title of his heirs unto 2, 67/ 9
past, the right and title that the most excellent 2, 73/ 10
-- the right and title of the same is 2, 73/ 33
very right and just title. Which thing, I wot 2, 74/ 12
to his right and title lawfully descended unto him 2, 78/ 20
can by so just title appertain as to ourself 2, 79/ 33
of York; to which title is now joined your 2, 80/ 2
And forasmuch as the title which he claimed by 2, 89/ 10
somewhat interlaced with the title to the crown by 2, 89/ 12
not to dispute his title. But for the weal 2, 93/ 19
 
 TITLES.................2
which we of all titles possible take for most 2, 80/ 4
in one, whose several titles had long inquieted the 2, 91/ 11
 
 TO.....................851
fair issue: that is to wit, Edward, the Prince 2, 3/ 6
and grace was after to be queen, wife unto 2, 3/ 8
personage and very princely to behold, of heart courageous 2, 4/ 10
of youth greatly given to fleshly wantonness -- from 2, 4/ 20
pleasure stretch and extend to the displeasure of very 2, 4/ 23
nor anything intended he to take in hand by 2, 5/ 3
and aldermen of London to him for none other 2, 5/ 15
none other errand but to have them hunt and 2, 5/ 15
toward him had been to his noble children (having 2, 5/ 24
of sovereignty provoked him to their destruction which if 2, 5/ 29
by office their Protector, to their father beholden, to 2, 6/ 4
to their father beholden, to themselves by oath and 2, 6/ 4
the world unnaturally contrived to bereave them not only 2, 6/ 7
is therefore convenient somewhat to show you, ere we 2, 6/ 10
heart so much mischief to conceive. Richard, Duke of 2, 6/ 12
war, but by law, to challenge the crown, putting 2, 6/ 15
not enduring so long to tarry, but intending, under 2, 6/ 21
arising in the realm, to prevent his time and 2, 6/ 22
prevent his time and to take upon him the 2, 6/ 23
the Duke himself, intending to be king -- at 2, 7/ 9
treason was there laid to his charge, and finally 2, 7/ 10
by Parliament, and judged to the death, and thereupon 2, 7/ 11
in the war, as to which his disposition was 2, 7/ 30
which he was fain to pill and spoil in 2, 8/ 6
inwardly hated, not letting to kiss whom he thought 2, 8/ 9
kiss whom he thought to kill; dispiteous and cruel 2, 8/ 9
appointed that butcherly office to some other than his 2, 8/ 21
his brother of Clarence to his death -- which 2, 8/ 23
that were heartily minded to his wealth. And they 2, 8/ 25
King Edward's life forethought to be king in case 2, 8/ 27
should shorten) should happen to decease (as indeed he 2, 8/ 29
had kept him true to his nephew the young 2, 9/ 4
young king or enterprised to be king himself. But 2, 9/ 5
came in great haste to the house of one 2, 9/ 9
cause he had so to think, hard it is 2, 9/ 14
think, hard it is to say -- whether he 2, 9/ 14
he was not likely to speak it of naught 2, 9/ 16
of naught. But now to return to the course 2, 9/ 20
But now to return to the course of this 2, 9/ 20
well wist, and helped to maintain, a long-continued grudge 2, 9/ 27
indeed) a furtherly beginning to the pursuit of his 2, 10/ 2
of the one party to the destruction of the 2, 10/ 5
other, and then win to his purpose as many 2, 10/ 6
should always be able to rule both the parties 2, 10/ 13
rather by pleasant advice to win themselves favor than 2, 10/ 24
than by profitable advertisement to do the children good 2, 10/ 25
the Lord Rivers, brother to the Queen, claimed of 2, 11/ 6
less while I look to live with you, the 2, 11/ 13
deeply am I moved to care in what case 2, 11/ 14
be my children like to find you. Which, if 2, 11/ 15
at variance, might hap to fall themselves at war 2, 11/ 17
their discretion would serve to set you at peace 2, 11/ 18
reckon the only surety to rest in your concord 2, 11/ 19
For where each laboreth to break that the other 2, 11/ 24
while either party laboreth to be chief, flattery shall 2, 11/ 28
infected, shall readily fall to mischief and riot and 2, 11/ 31
with this noble realm to ruin, but if grace 2, 11/ 31
if grace turn him to wisdom; which if God 2, 12/ 1
length, evil drifts drive to naught and good plain 2, 12/ 3
I leave for preachers to tell you -- and 2, 12/ 9
preacher's words ought more to move you than his 2, 12/ 11
by and by going to the place that they 2, 12/ 11
shall I desire you to remember: that the one 2, 12/ 12
no less move us to charity than the respect 2, 12/ 17
cause that you ought to love the better! And 2, 12/ 19
and law most ought to agree together. Such a 2, 12/ 21
variance he turneth all to mischief -- first longing 2, 12/ 25
mischief -- first longing to be next the best 2, 12/ 26
and likely right well to prosper in wealthful peace 2, 13/ 10
that ever I look to speak with you, I 2, 13/ 17
you have ever borne to me, for the love 2, 13/ 19
I have ever borne to you, for the love 2, 13/ 19
that our Lord beareth to us all, from this 2, 13/ 20
King, no longer enduring to sit up, laid him 2, 13/ 24
time as they thought to stand with his pleasure 2, 13/ 28
the law and recourse to justice, was begun to 2, 14/ 4
to justice, was begun to be far out of 2, 14/ 4
his father sent thither, to the end that the 2, 14/ 7
of their former outrages. To the governance and ordering 2, 14/ 9
nor in any wise to be suffered that the 2, 14/ 22
pleasure, was full unmeet to be matched with his 2, 14/ 28
his -- which now to be, as who say 2, 14/ 29
and the less noble to be left about him 2, 14/ 29
quoth he, "neither honorable to His Majesty nor unto 2, 14/ 30
unto us, and also to His Grace no surety 2, 14/ 31
His Grace no surety to have the mightiest of 2, 14/ 31
us no little jeopardy to suffer our well-proved evil-willers 2, 15/ 1
suffer our well-proved evil-willers to grow in over-great authority 2, 15/ 2
were hard, I ween, to guess. And if some 2, 15/ 9
have betrapped and brought to confusion some of us 2, 15/ 12
will, and, thanks be to his grace, that peril 2, 15/ 14
name of "his commandment" to any of our undoing 2, 15/ 17
is so unwise oversoon to trust a new friend 2, 15/ 21
an old foe, or to think that an hoverly 2, 15/ 22
were of themselves easy to kindle, and in especial 2, 15/ 27
-- not bearing each to other so much love 2, 15/ 32
about the King intended to bring him up to 2, 16/ 5
to bring him up to his coronation accompanied with 2, 16/ 5
be hard for him to bring his purpose to 2, 16/ 7
to bring his purpose to pass without the gathering 2, 16/ 7
means, caused the Queen to be persuaded and brought 2, 16/ 12
be jeopardous, the King to come up strong. For 2, 16/ 13
had been sometime debate to fear and suspect lest 2, 16/ 18
destruction, having more regard to their old variance than 2, 16/ 20
which was likely not to be little, and the 2, 16/ 25
most harm there like to fall where she least 2, 16/ 26
King so reverently, and to the Queen's friends there 2, 17/ 4
King in his way to London gone from Northampton 2, 17/ 7
intending on the morrow to follow the King and 2, 17/ 13
they sent about privily to their servants in their 2, 17/ 23
about, giving them commandment to make themselves shortly ready 2, 17/ 25
for their lords were to horseback-ward. Upon which messages 2, 17/ 26
back again and compel to return any man that 2, 18/ 3
show of their diligence, to be the first that 2, 18/ 6
servants nor himself suffered to go out -- perceiving 2, 18/ 10
lest he should seem to hide himself for some 2, 18/ 15
of his own conscience, to go boldly to them 2, 18/ 17
conscience, to go boldly to them and inquire what 2, 18/ 18
they saw, they began to quarrel with him and 2, 18/ 19
say that he intended to set distance between the 2, 18/ 20
King and them, and to bring them to confusion 2, 18/ 21
and to bring them to confusion, but it should 2, 18/ 21
man) in goodly wise to excuse himself, they tarried 2, 18/ 23
that done, forthwith went to horseback and took the 2, 18/ 26
and took the way to Stony Stratford -- where 2, 18/ 27
with his company ready to leap on horseback and 2, 18/ 28
horseback and depart forward, to leave that lodging for 2, 18/ 29
their company about them. To whom the Duke of 2, 19/ 1
goodly array they came to the King, and on 2, 19/ 3
they picked a quarrel to the Lord Richard Grey 2, 19/ 7
his uncle, had compassed to rule the King and 2, 19/ 10
and the realm, and to set variance among the 2, 19/ 11
among the states, and to subdue and destroy the 2, 19/ 12
treasure, and sent men to the sea. All which 2, 19/ 15
from his own table to the Lord Rivers, praying 2, 20/ 3
Lord Rivers, praying him to be of good cheer 2, 20/ 4
and prayed the messenger to bear it to his 2, 20/ 5
messenger to bear it to his nephew the Lord 2, 20/ 6
of comfort, as one to whom such adversity was 2, 20/ 8
country into divers places to prison, and afterward all 2, 20/ 13
prison, and afterward all to Pomfret, where they were 2, 20/ 13
this matter came hastily to the Queen, a little 2, 20/ 18
no man wist whither, to be done with God 2, 20/ 21
then Chancellor of England), to his place not far 2, 21/ 5
him in charge not to forbear his rest, they 2, 21/ 8
rest, they letted not to wake him, nor he 2, 21/ 8
wake him, nor he to admit this messenger into 2, 21/ 9
haste all his servants to be called up, and 2, 21/ 16
breaking down the walls to bring in the next 2, 21/ 24
and some yet drew to them that helped to 2, 21/ 25
to them that helped to carry a wrong way 2, 21/ 25
of them that laboreth to destroy me and my 2, 22/ 5
deliver it unto you, to the use and behoof 2, 22/ 10
no man should go to sanctuary, nor none could 2, 22/ 15
as it was indeed) to his overmuch lightness that 2, 22/ 29
up the Great Seal to the Queen, to whom 2, 22/ 30
Seal to the Queen, to whom the custody thereof 2, 22/ 30
man doubted nor needed to doubt, persuaded the lords 2, 23/ 4
doubt, persuaded the lords to believe that the Duke 2, 23/ 4
sure and fastly faithful to his prince, and that 2, 23/ 5
as it were likely, to come to a field 2, 23/ 22
were likely, to come to a field, though both 2, 23/ 22
voice or semblance, than to his coronation -- causing 2, 23/ 30
-- causing the fame to be blown about that 2, 23/ 30
blood of the realm, to the end that themselves 2, 24/ 1
conveyed in their carriage to destroy the noble lords 2, 24/ 10
it made the matter to wise men more unlikely 2, 24/ 11
on their backs than to have bound them up 2, 24/ 13
said it were alms to hang them. When the 2, 24/ 15
the King approached near to the city, Edmund Shaa 2, 24/ 16
open sight so reverently to the Prince, with all 2, 24/ 24
and thought most meet, to be Protector of the 2, 24/ 28
the lamb was betaken to the wolf to keep 2, 24/ 30
betaken to the wolf to keep. At which Council 2, 24/ 30
up the Great Seal to the Queen, was thereof 2, 25/ 3
from him and delivered to Doctor Russell, Bishop of 2, 25/ 4
the realm would fall to the other, if he 2, 25/ 15
haply be shortly conveyed to his farther liberty. Wherefore 2, 25/ 17
pleasure and comfort were to have his brother with 2, 25/ 23
that by her done to none other intent but 2, 25/ 28
none other intent but to bring all the lords 2, 25/ 28
though they were not to be trusted with the 2, 25/ 29
the King's nearest friends, to the tuition of his 2, 25/ 31
nevertheless of estate convenient to accompany his noble majesty 2, 26/ 11
verily, it redoundeth greatly to the dishonor both of 2, 26/ 16
be about His Grace, to have it run in 2, 26/ 18
brother should be fain to keep sanctuary. For every 2, 26/ 20
hearts, hard it is to wrest out, and may 2, 26/ 23
out, and may grow to more grief than any 2, 26/ 23
it were not worst to send unto the Queen 2, 26/ 25
if it please him to take the pain. Which 2, 26/ 31
rest and quiet grow to all the realm. And 2, 27/ 6
prison and bring him to his noble presence -- 2, 27/ 10
all the world shall, to our honor and her 2, 27/ 12
folly that caused her to keep him there. This 2, 27/ 14
your lordships anything perceive to the contrary. For never 2, 27/ 16
grace, so wed myself to mine own will but 2, 27/ 17
I shall be ready to change it upon your 2, 27/ 18
good and reasonable, and to the King and the 2, 27/ 20
by good means induced to deliver him. Which thing 2, 27/ 23
they all agreed also to be thereto most convenient 2, 27/ 24
convenient, took upon him to move her, and therein 2, 27/ 25
move her, and therein to do his uttermost devoir 2, 27/ 25
with her good will to deliver him, then thought 2, 27/ 27
not in any wise to be attempted to take 2, 27/ 28
wise to be attempted to take him out against 2, 27/ 29
thing that should turn to the great grudge of 2, 27/ 30
specially hallowed and dedicated to God (for the proof 2, 28/ 5
abbey Saint Peter's cope to show) that from that 2, 28/ 6
that durst it presume to consecrate. "And therefore," quoth 2, 28/ 8
for anything earthly, enterprise to break the immunity and 2, 28/ 10
bring it not so to pass, yet shall I 2, 28/ 16
needeth no such thing to fear, either for her 2, 28/ 21
were there no cause to think that we should 2, 28/ 28
the King's noble brother, to whose grace we besides 2, 28/ 28
as much regard took to his wealth as to 2, 28/ 30
to his wealth as to her own will, she 2, 28/ 31
would be as loath to suffer him from the 2, 28/ 31
the deliverance of him to follow the counsel of 2, 29/ 9
-- it is easy to perceive that frowardness letteth 2, 29/ 11
not fear. But go to, suppose that she fear 2, 29/ 12
who may let her to fear her own shadow 2, 29/ 13
The more she feareth to deliver him, the more 2, 29/ 13
more ought we fear to leave him in her 2, 29/ 14
if she might happen to bring that to pass 2, 29/ 29
happen to bring that to pass (as it were 2, 29/ 29
that would be about to break them. And in 2, 30/ 4
if they were now to begin, I would not 2, 30/ 5
that should be about to make them. Yet will 2, 30/ 6
some place of liberty, to keep their bodies out 2, 30/ 10
as it hath done) to come in question, while 2, 30/ 11
manquellers, whom God bade to take from the altar 2, 30/ 18
or misfortune draw him to that deed, a pardon 2, 30/ 21
any favorable necessity compelled to go thither. And then 2, 30/ 25
willful unthriftiness hath brought to naught. "What a rabble 2, 30/ 27
find it much better to lack both than have 2, 31/ 1
while men be afeard to set their hands to 2, 31/ 4
to set their hands to the amendment -- as 2, 31/ 4
but a license also to do more. Howbeit, much 2, 31/ 17
would set their hands to, it might be amended 2, 31/ 18
forth as may serve to let us of the 2, 31/ 25
forth of this nobleman, to his honor and wealth 2, 31/ 25
A sanctuary serveth always to defend the body of 2, 31/ 28
pope nor king intended to privilege any one place 2, 32/ 1
is lawful one man to do another wrong? That 2, 32/ 3
every place, and maketh, to that regard, for every 2, 32/ 5
is far, whose love to his king, nature and 2, 32/ 9
kindred proveth; whose innocence, to all the world his 2, 32/ 10
have. Men come not to sanctuary as they come 2, 32/ 12
sanctuary as they come to baptism, to require it 2, 32/ 13
they come to baptism, to require it by their 2, 32/ 13
no man hath cause to have it but whose 2, 32/ 14
maketh him fain need to require it. What will 2, 32/ 16
if he had discretion to require it if need 2, 32/ 18
any breach of privilege, to be somewhat more homely 2, 32/ 21
For if one go to sanctuary with another man's 2, 32/ 22
his debts, being able to pay." And with that 2, 32/ 26
debts, and stolen goods to the owner, and only 2, 32/ 30
only liberty reserved him to get his living with 2, 32/ 31
sanctuary because she list to run from her husband 2, 32/ 33
lawfully, without any displeasure to Saint Peter, take her 2, 33/ 1
sanctuary because he feareth to go to school, his 2, 33/ 4
he feareth to go to school, his master must 2, 33/ 4
Whoso may have deserved to need it, if they 2, 33/ 11
that neither hath wisdom to desire it nor malice 2, 33/ 13
desire it nor malice to deserve it, whose life 2, 33/ 13
one out of sanctuary to do him good, I 2, 33/ 18
Cardinal should first essay to get him with her 2, 33/ 25
departed into the sanctuary to the Queen, with divers 2, 33/ 28
not in this matter to trust any one man 2, 33/ 32
she finally were determined to keep him, some of 2, 34/ 1
incontinent, maugre her mind, to take him, and to 2, 34/ 2
to take him, and to leave her no respite 2, 34/ 3
leave her no respite to convey him; which she 2, 34/ 3
which she was likely to mind after this matter 2, 34/ 4
after this matter broken to her, if her time 2, 34/ 4
highly sounded, not only to the great rumor of 2, 34/ 10
their obloquy, but also to the importable grief and 2, 34/ 11
the King's royal majesty. To whose grace it were 2, 34/ 12
were as singular comfort to have his natural brother 2, 34/ 13
theirs and hers also, to suffer him in sanctuary 2, 34/ 14
sent him unto her to require her the delivery 2, 34/ 16
he be demeaned according to his estate. And she 2, 34/ 20
both do great good to the realm, pleasure to 2, 34/ 21
to the realm, pleasure to the Council, and profit 2, 34/ 21
the Council, and profit to herself, succor to her 2, 34/ 21
profit to herself, succor to her friends that were 2, 34/ 22
great comfort and honor to the King but also 2, 34/ 24
the King but also to the young duke himself 2, 34/ 24
great wealth it were to be together, as well 2, 34/ 25
were as great commodity to them both as, for 2, 35/ 3
for yet a while, to be in the custody 2, 35/ 3
also needeth good looking to, hath a while been 2, 35/ 6
waxeth the less able to bear out a new 2, 35/ 13
either knoweth better how to order him than I 2, 35/ 15
is more tenderly like to cherish him than his 2, 35/ 16
stand with your pleasure to be in such place 2, 35/ 21
if you appoint yourself to tarry here, then think 2, 35/ 22
honorably, at his liberty, to the comfort of them 2, 35/ 24
as a sanctuary man, to their both dishonor and 2, 35/ 25
always so great necessity to have the child be 2, 35/ 26
should be more expedient to keep him elsewhere. Which 2, 35/ 28
Protector is so desirous to have him in his 2, 35/ 35
all their honors there to suffer him bide where 2, 36/ 21
as yet intend not to come forth and jeopard 2, 36/ 23
that have not letted to put them in duress 2, 36/ 29
will let as little to procure their destruction without 2, 36/ 30
Cardinal made a countenance to the other lord that 2, 36/ 32
And then said he to the Queen that he 2, 36/ 33
so near of kin to the King? And how 2, 37/ 5
purpose not as yet to depart hence. And as 2, 37/ 7
without any substantial cause to have him, this maketh 2, 37/ 10
much the more farther to deliver him." "Truly, madam 2, 37/ 11
farther that you be to deliver him, the farther 2, 37/ 12
farther be other men to suffer you to keep 2, 37/ 13
men to suffer you to keep him, lest your 2, 37/ 13
might cause you further to convey him. And many 2, 37/ 14
neither can have will to ask it nor malice 2, 37/ 16
ask it nor malice to deserve it. And therefore 2, 37/ 16
if ye finally refuse to deliver him, I verily 2, 37/ 18
Your Grace should hap to send him away." "Ah 2, 37/ 20
Protector so tender zeal to him that he feareth 2, 37/ 22
is in the plight to send out -- and 2, 37/ 24
devilish that durst presume to break? And I trust 2, 38/ 1
God as strong now to withstand his adversaries as 2, 38/ 1
could none be found to play with the King 2, 38/ 15
that hath no lust to play, for sickness -- 2, 38/ 16
out of his safeguard, to play with him. As 2, 38/ 17
suppose he would ask to go out. If I 2, 38/ 24
since the law committeth to me the custody of 2, 39/ 3
if examples be sufficient to obtain privilege for my 2, 39/ 7
I need not far to seek. For in this 2, 39/ 9
his cradle and preserved to a more prosperous fortune 2, 39/ 13
I pray God long to continue. And as all 2, 39/ 14
then went I hence to welcome him home, and 2, 39/ 19
be as great safeguard to him now reigning, as 2, 39/ 22
this place was sometime to the king's enemy. In 2, 39/ 23
which place I intend to keep his brother, since 2, 39/ 24
Wherefore, here intend I to keep him, since man's 2, 39/ 25
law serveth the guardian to keep the infant, the 2, 39/ 26
-- since I fear to put him in the 2, 39/ 28
if both failed, inheritor to the crown. The cause 2, 39/ 29
fear hath no man to do to examine. And 2, 39/ 30
no man to do to examine. And yet fear 2, 39/ 30
he may not come to it. For taken out 2, 40/ 4
also that she began to kindle and chafe and 2, 40/ 9
and was also loath to hear, he said unto 2, 40/ 11
if she were content to deliver the Duke to 2, 40/ 13
to deliver the Duke to him and to the 2, 40/ 13
Duke to him and to the other lords there 2, 40/ 13
them a resolute answer to the contrary, he would 2, 40/ 16
he never intended more to move her in that 2, 40/ 18
should procure her son to be delivered into his 2, 40/ 22
the Cardinal more ready to depart than some of 2, 40/ 25
be taken thence; and to convey him elsewhere, neither 2, 40/ 28
neither had she time to serve her nor place 2, 40/ 29
less looking for than to have him fetched out 2, 41/ 1
sanctuary, which she thought to be now beset in 2, 41/ 2
might fortune her fear to be false, so well 2, 41/ 5
she deemed it best to deliver him. And over 2, 41/ 6
them the more warily to look to him, and 2, 41/ 11
more warily to look to him, and the more 2, 41/ 11
and the more circumspectly to see to his surety 2, 41/ 11
more circumspectly to see to his surety, if she 2, 41/ 11
own hands betook him to them of trust. And 2, 41/ 12
neither am so unwise to mistrust your wits nor 2, 41/ 14
wits nor so suspicious to mistrust your troths. Of 2, 41/ 15
which thing I purpose to make you such a 2, 41/ 16
might turn both me to great sorrow, the realm 2, 41/ 17
great sorrow, the realm to much harm, and you 2, 41/ 17
much harm, and you to great reproach. For lo 2, 41/ 18
both more perilous than to be both in one 2, 41/ 30
his brother in him, to keep, into your hands 2, 41/ 33
wise. Power and strength to keep him if ye 2, 42/ 2
forthwith they brought him to the King his brother 2, 42/ 19
himself more boldly, both to certain other men and 2, 42/ 26
men and also chiefly to the Duke of Buckingham 2, 42/ 27
this duke was privy to all the Protector's counsel 2, 42/ 29
mover of the Protector to this matter, sending a 2, 42/ 32
ever opened his enterprise to the Duke until he 2, 43/ 3
until he had brought to pass the things before 2, 43/ 3
purpose with less fear to them whom he thought 2, 43/ 6
the matter, and especially to the Duke -- who 2, 43/ 7
-- who being won to his purpose, he thought 2, 43/ 8
if they were put to death, without doubt the 2, 43/ 15
was no way left to redeem his offense by 2, 43/ 18
the Duke, and trains to catch him if he 2, 43/ 24
Duke's mind, brought him to that point that, where 2, 43/ 29
go through. And therefore to this wicked enterprise, which 2, 43/ 32
much as he might to his own commodity. Then 2, 43/ 35
have the Duke's aid to make him king, and 2, 44/ 2
themselves, they went about to prepare for the coronation 2, 44/ 9
the realm, came thick to that solemnity. But the 2, 44/ 14
with many other noblemen, to commune and devise about 2, 44/ 18
contriving the contrary, and to make the Protector king 2, 44/ 20
make the Protector king. To which council albeit there 2, 44/ 21
dealing itself made men to muse on the matter 2, 44/ 30
the Tower and drew to Crosby's Place in Bishopsgate 2, 44/ 31
their business made suit to them that had the 2, 45/ 1
might haply turn them to no good to be 2, 45/ 3
them to no good to be too much attendant 2, 45/ 3
and some lords eke, to mark the matter and 2, 45/ 8
special trust, reckoning himself to no man so lief 2, 45/ 22
there was no man to him so much beholden 2, 45/ 23
he now construed all to the best. So surely 2, 46/ 2
well, and loath was to have lost him, saving 2, 46/ 10
cause he moved Catesby to prove, with some words 2, 46/ 12
could think it possible to win the Lord Hastings 2, 46/ 13
mistrust that others began to have in the matter 2, 46/ 18
procured the Protector hastily to rid him. And much 2, 46/ 21
trusted by his death to obtain much of the 2, 46/ 23
allective that induced him to be partner and one 2, 46/ 25
after -- that is to wit, on the Friday 2, 46/ 27
better thing as ready to your pleasure as that 2, 47/ 9
and thereupon, praying them to spare him for a 2, 47/ 11
What were they worthy to have, that compass and 2, 47/ 21
that they were worthy to be punished as heinous 2, 47/ 28
and of their putting to death, which were by 2, 48/ 3
his assent before devised to be beheaded at Pomfret 2, 48/ 4
up his doublet sleeve to his elbow upon his 2, 48/ 10
Queen was too wise to go about any such 2, 48/ 14
certain kind of fidelity to his friend) answered and 2, 48/ 22
anon the Protector said to the Lord Hastings, "I 2, 48/ 30
head had been cleft to the teeth; for as 2, 49/ 4
he, "I will not to dinner till I see 2, 49/ 13
It booted him not to ask why, but heavily 2, 49/ 13
made so much haste to dinner -- which he 2, 49/ 15
he might not go to till this were done 2, 49/ 16
marvelous case is it to hear, either the warnings 2, 49/ 25
the haste, requiring him to rise and ride away 2, 49/ 31
disposed utterly no longer to bide -- he had 2, 49/ 32
thoroughly determined no longer to tarry, but had his 2, 50/ 7
would go with him, to ride so far yet 2, 50/ 8
quoth the Lord Hastings to this messenger, "leaneth my 2, 50/ 10
thy master so much to such trifles, and hath 2, 50/ 11
it is plain witchcraft to believe in such dreams 2, 50/ 13
were tokens of things to come, why thinketh he 2, 50/ 14
might be as likely to make them true by 2, 50/ 15
boar a cause likely to raze us with his 2, 50/ 17
heart. And therefore go to thy master, man, and 2, 50/ 22
man, and commend me to him, and pray him 2, 50/ 22
stumbled with him almost to the falling; which thing 2, 50/ 28
wot well daily happeneth to them to whom no 2, 50/ 29
daily happeneth to them to whom no such mischance 2, 50/ 29
it were of courtesy to accompany him to the 2, 51/ 2
courtesy to accompany him to the Council, but of 2, 51/ 2
sent by the Protector to hasten him thitherward, with 2, 51/ 3
Chamberlain by the way to stay his horse and 2, 51/ 6
tale and said merrily to him, "What, my lord 2, 51/ 7
had happened them before to meet in like manner 2, 51/ 18
gave him great pleasure to talk with him thereof 2, 51/ 30
as thou mayest hap to hear more hereafter), and 2, 52/ 12
dissolute; plain and open to his enemy and secret 2, 52/ 20
his enemy and secret to his friend; easy to 2, 52/ 20
to his friend; easy to beguile, as he that 2, 52/ 20
immediately after dinner, intending to set some color upon 2, 52/ 25
that they would vouchsafe to have put upon their 2, 52/ 29
his conspiracy had contrived to have suddenly destroyed him 2, 53/ 1
sudden fear drove them to put on for their 2, 53/ 5
harness as came next to hand; and so had 2, 53/ 5
this he required them to report. Every man answered 2, 53/ 7
arms with a proclamation to be made through the 2, 53/ 12
conspired the same day to have slain the Lord 2, 53/ 16
the Council, and after to have taken upon them 2, 53/ 17
have taken upon them to rule the King and 2, 53/ 18
their pleasure, and thereby to pill and spoil whom 2, 53/ 19
in the proclamation devised to the slander of the 2, 53/ 20
was an evil counselor to the King's father, enticing 2, 53/ 21
King's father, enticing him to many things highly redounding 2, 53/ 21
many things highly redounding to the diminishing of his 2, 53/ 22
of his honor and to the universal hurt of 2, 53/ 22
ungracious living brought him to an unhappy ending -- 2, 53/ 29
partners of his conspiracy, to gather and assemble themselves 2, 53/ 34
and sent her body to prison. And when he 2, 54/ 17
that she went about to bewitch him and that 2, 54/ 19
with the Lord Chamberlain to destroy him -- in 2, 54/ 20
then he laid heinously to her charge the thing 2, 54/ 21
every man laughed at to hear it then so 2, 54/ 23
the bishop of London to put her to open 2, 54/ 27
London to put her to open penance: going before 2, 54/ 27
living and glad were to see sin corrected, yet 2, 55/ 4
-- was able soon to pierce a soft, tender 2, 55/ 16
good -- not presuming to touch a King's concubine 2, 55/ 18
concubine), left her up to him altogether. When the 2, 55/ 19
liveth) deem her never to have been well-visaged. Whose 2, 55/ 27
of the church lightly to any place but it 2, 56/ 9
place but it were to his bed. The other 2, 56/ 10
of their humility content to be nameless and to 2, 56/ 11
to be nameless and to forbear the praise of 2, 56/ 11
he loved; whose favor, to say the truth (for 2, 56/ 14
for sin it were to belie the devil), she 2, 56/ 14
devil), she never abused to any man's hurt, but 2, 56/ 15
any man's hurt, but to many a man's comfort 2, 56/ 15
for that she delighted to be sued unto and 2, 56/ 22
be sued unto and to show what she was 2, 56/ 23
what she was able to do with the King 2, 56/ 23
too slight a thing to be written of and 2, 56/ 27
much the more worthy to be remembered in how 2, 56/ 30
those days had business to speed, as many other 2, 57/ 1
have an evil turn, to write it in marble 2, 57/ 5
out of the prison to the scaffold, and showing 2, 57/ 27
the scaffold, and showing to the people about that 2, 57/ 27
traitors (not suffering them to speak and declare their 2, 57/ 28
might have inclined men to pity them and to 2, 57/ 29
to pity them and to hate the Protector and 2, 57/ 29
or manner of order, to be beheaded, and without 2, 58/ 1
good men, too true to the King and too 2, 58/ 2
King and too nigh to the Queen. Now, when 2, 58/ 2
no man wist what to think nor whom to 2, 58/ 7
to think nor whom to trust, ere ever they 2, 58/ 7
they should have space to dispute and digest the 2, 58/ 8
it were best hastily to pursue his purpose and 2, 58/ 9
men could have time to devise any ways to 2, 58/ 10
to devise any ways to resist. But now was 2, 58/ 10
might be first broken to the people in such 2, 58/ 12
might be well taken. To this counsel they took 2, 58/ 12
as they thought meet to be trusted, likely to 2, 58/ 13
to be trusted, likely to be induced to that 2, 58/ 14
likely to be induced to that part, and able 2, 58/ 14
that part, and able to stand them in stead 2, 58/ 14
should frame the city to their appetite. Of spiritual 2, 58/ 19
Shaa -- cleric, brother to the Mayor -- and 2, 58/ 23
that he was fain to leave off and come 2, 59/ 3
the common manner, fell to flattery after -- namely 2, 59/ 9
preaching incline the people to the Protector's ghostly purpose 2, 59/ 14
people should be content to depose the Prince and 2, 59/ 16
he should seem disabled to inherit the crown by 2, 59/ 21
the Prince by him. To lay bastardy in King 2, 59/ 24
King Edward sounded openly to the rebuke of the 2, 59/ 24
mother, which was mother to them both; for in 2, 59/ 25
none other color but to pretend that his own 2, 59/ 26
adulteress -- which, notwithstanding, to further this purpose he 2, 59/ 27
spared in that point to speak all the truth 2, 59/ 31
bastardy that they devised to surmise in King Edward's 2, 59/ 32
openly declared, and enforced to the uttermost. The color 2, 59/ 34
the realm, determining himself to marry (as it was 2, 60/ 4
his company, unto Spain, to entreat and conclude a 2, 60/ 7
that he speedily, according to his instructions, without any 2, 60/ 10
difficulty, brought the matter to very good conclusion. Now 2, 60/ 11
mean season there came, to make a suit by 2, 60/ 12
a suit by petition to the King, Dame Elizabeth 2, 60/ 13
afterward secretly aside, began to enter in talking more 2, 61/ 8
say her mind, as to him whose heart she 2, 61/ 21
more firmly set than to fall off for a 2, 61/ 22
wist herself too simple to be his wife, so 2, 61/ 24
she herself too good to be his concubine. The 2, 61/ 24
not been wont elsewhere to be so stiffly said 2, 61/ 26
in all possible haste to marry her. And after 2, 61/ 29
it booted not greatly to say nay. Notwithstanding, the 2, 61/ 34
profit, and surety also, to marry in a noble 2, 62/ 3
whereupon depended great strength to his estate by the 2, 62/ 4
which were not likely to take it well if 2, 62/ 7
it was not princely to marry his own subject 2, 62/ 9
albeit there was nothing to be misliked, yet was 2, 62/ 17
yet suffice, as meseemeth, to refrain you from her 2, 62/ 25
and high disparagement -- to the sacred majesty of 2, 62/ 27
that ought as nigh to approach priesthood in cleanness 2, 62/ 27
he doth in dignity, to be defouled with bigamy 2, 62/ 28
or otherwise. Howbeit, somewhat to satisfy her, he said 2, 63/ 5
spiritual thing, ought rather to be made for the 2, 63/ 6
grace inclineth the parties to love together, as he 2, 63/ 7
which he thought likely to bear him so much 2, 63/ 12
that he disdained not to marry with one of 2, 63/ 12
would find the means to enter thereinto much better 2, 63/ 16
could be contented, than to marry himself whom he 2, 63/ 17
them that like them to wed them. No more 2, 63/ 27
loveth me so little to grudge at that I 2, 63/ 31
nor is so unreasonable to look that I should 2, 63/ 32
ward that were bound to marry by the appointment 2, 63/ 33
with that condition -- to forbear mine own liberty 2, 64/ 2
title by that means to so much as sufficeth 2, 64/ 5
so much as sufficeth to get and keep well 2, 64/ 5
of us is likely to be barren. And therefore 2, 64/ 12
way when I come to take Orders. For I 2, 64/ 18
pretext of her duty to Godward, she devised to 2, 64/ 22
to Godward, she devised to disturb this marriage, and 2, 64/ 23
this marriage, and rather to help that he should 2, 64/ 23
the King was sure to Dame Elizabeth Lucy, and 2, 64/ 29
King would not, proceed to the solemnization of this 2, 64/ 31
put in good comfort to affirm that she was 2, 65/ 1
she was solemnly sworn to say the truth, she 2, 65/ 2
have shown such kindness to him, to let him 2, 65/ 6
such kindness to him, to let him so kindly 2, 65/ 6
loved her better than to grant her her boon 2, 65/ 12
he could be able to resist, that he was 2, 65/ 16
that he was fain to void the realm and 2, 65/ 17
pleasure, and not impossible to have attained it himself 2, 65/ 32
it a greater thing to make a king than 2, 65/ 33
make a king than to be a king. But 2, 66/ 1
pretended King Edward's children to be bastards. But that 2, 66/ 12
was, it liked them to whom it sufficed to 2, 66/ 13
to whom it sufficed to have somewhat to say 2, 66/ 13
sufficed to have somewhat to say, while they were 2, 66/ 13
while they were sure to be compelled to no 2, 66/ 14
sure to be compelled to no larger proof than 2, 66/ 14
proof than themselves list to make. Now then, as 2, 66/ 15
then, as I began to show you, it was 2, 66/ 15
at Paul's Cross signify to the people that neither 2, 66/ 18
upon the Queen. According to this device, Doctor Shaa 2, 66/ 25
always assembled great number to his preaching), he took 2, 66/ 26
radices altas," that is to say, "Bastard slips shall 2, 66/ 28
but, the truth coming to light, the rightful inheritors 2, 67/ 3
histories, then began he to descend into the praise 2, 67/ 7
York, calling him "father to the Lord Protector," and 2, 67/ 9
heirs unto the crown, to whom it was, after 2, 67/ 10
in among the people to the sermonward, to the 2, 68/ 1
people to the sermonward, to the end that those 2, 68/ 2
the people even there to cry "King Richard! King 2, 68/ 5
his sermon could come to those words, hastened his 2, 68/ 10
-- he was come to them and past them 2, 68/ 11
of all frame, began to repeat those words again 2, 68/ 14
story, where he stood to hearken the sermon. But 2, 68/ 24
it so struck him to the heart that, within 2, 68/ 33
you, we be come to break unto you of 2, 69/ 12
unto God and profitable to all the realm; nor 2, 69/ 14
all the realm; nor to no part of the 2, 69/ 15
realm more profitable than to you, the citizens of 2, 69/ 15
would have gone far to fetch -- that thing 2, 69/ 18
we be come hither to bring you, without your 2, 69/ 19
great substance of goods to be lashed out among 2, 69/ 30
his good will list to grant, but what the 2, 70/ 3
his good will list to take! Which never asked 2, 70/ 4
into ransoms, small trespass to misprision, misprision into treason 2, 70/ 6
with no less honor to Markham, then Chief Justice 2, 70/ 16
than he would assent to that judgment, than to 2, 70/ 18
to that judgment, than to the dishonesty of those 2, 70/ 18
that it happed those to favor him whom the 2, 70/ 27
need not, I suppose, to rehearse of these any 2, 70/ 28
a pretext of treason to have been of kindred 2, 71/ 4
scarcely the half remaineth, to the great enfeebling of 2, 71/ 21
that have been going to the field or coming 2, 71/ 23
for his honor, spare to speak of. Howbeit, this 2, 71/ 30
and abominable strumpet, than to all the lords in 2, 71/ 32
faith I am sorry to speak of, saving that 2, 72/ 4
it is in vain to keep in counsel that 2, 72/ 4
appetite and have her; to the great destruction of 2, 72/ 11
woman, and great dolor to their husband and their 2, 72/ 12
that them were liefer to lose all that they 2, 72/ 15
they have besides than to have such a villainy 2, 72/ 16
things as minister matter to such injuries as for 2, 72/ 19
cause well and kindly to treat as any part 2, 72/ 22
ever your special favor to his party. Which -- 2, 72/ 28
your kind minds borne to the house of York 2, 72/ 29
better shall; which thing to show you is the 2, 72/ 31
am not so proud to look therefor -- that 2, 73/ 3
none honest man cometh to lie. Which honorable preacher 2, 73/ 8
honor, was full unmeet to be matched with his 2, 73/ 19
wherein every man forbeareth to say that he knoweth 2, 73/ 26
requireth, a filial reverence to the Duchess, his mother 2, 73/ 27
fore-remembered -- that is to wit, for lack of 2, 73/ 29
Richard, Duke of York, to whose royal blood the 2, 73/ 31
course of inheritance, according to the common law of 2, 74/ 1
the Lord Protector, as to the very lawfully begotten 2, 74/ 2
willing any bastard blood to have the rule of 2, 74/ 6
same used any longer to continue, have condescended and 2, 74/ 8
condescended and fully determined to make humble petition unto 2, 74/ 8
at our humble request, to take upon him the 2, 74/ 10
governance of this realm, to the wealth and increase 2, 74/ 11
of the same, according to his very right and 2, 74/ 12
he will be loath to take upon him, as 2, 74/ 13
that shall come therewith to whosoever so well occupy 2, 74/ 14
that hath a child to their king." Wherefore, so 2, 74/ 18
more cause have we to thank God that this 2, 74/ 19
as I have said, to take it upon him 2, 74/ 22
him, yet shall he to our petition in that 2, 74/ 23
heartily pray you so to do, whereby you shall 2, 74/ 26
shall do great profit to all this realm besides 2, 74/ 29
unto yourselves special commodity, to whom His Majesty shall 2, 74/ 30
we require you plainly to show us." When the 2, 74/ 34
taking the Mayor nearer to him, with others that 2, 75/ 5
were about him privy to that matter, said unto 2, 75/ 6
which they might seem to common what was best 2, 75/ 17
common what was best to do. When the Mayor 2, 75/ 18
not been accustomed there to be spoken unto "but 2, 75/ 20
the city; and haply to him they will answer 2, 75/ 21
he never had spoken to the people before -- 2, 75/ 26
was with that matter to begin -- notwithstanding, thereunto 2, 75/ 27
the Mayor, made rehearsal to the commons of that 2, 75/ 28
Dear friends, we come to move you to that 2, 76/ 3
come to move you to that thing -- which 2, 76/ 3
that thing in which to be partners is your 2, 76/ 7
the realm be -- to have this noble prince 2, 76/ 10
noble prince, now Protector, to be your king -- 2, 76/ 10
words the people began to whisper among themselves secretly 2, 76/ 13
Nashfield's, and others belonging to the Protector, with some 2, 76/ 17
suddenly at men's backs to cry out as loud 2, 76/ 19
they wisely turned it to their purpose and said 2, 76/ 26
cry and a joyful to hear, every man with 2, 76/ 27
all your whole minds to have this noble man 2, 76/ 29
unto his noble Grace, to make our humble request 2, 76/ 33
the Duke, not able to dissemble their sorrow, were 2, 77/ 4
fain at his back to turn their face to 2, 77/ 5
to turn their face to the wall while the 2, 77/ 5
where the Protector lay. To which place repaired also 2, 77/ 11
place repaired also, according to their appointment, the Duke 2, 77/ 11
great and honorable company, to move a great matter 2, 77/ 15
the Protector made difficulty to come out unto them 2, 77/ 16
so humbly besought him to vouchsafe that they might 2, 77/ 23
that they might resort to his presence to purpose 2, 77/ 24
resort to his presence to purpose their intent, of 2, 77/ 24
see him and speak to him; as though he 2, 77/ 28
them and license them to purpose unto His Grace 2, 77/ 31
durst not be bold to move him of that 2, 78/ 2
meant as much honor to His Grace as wealth 2, 78/ 3
His Grace as wealth to all the realm besides 2, 78/ 3
and also longed sore to wit what they meant 2, 78/ 6
meant, gave him leave to purpose what him liked 2, 78/ 6
himward wherewith he ought to be grieved. When the 2, 78/ 9
this leave and pardon to speak, then waxed he 2, 78/ 9
then waxed he bold to show him their intent 2, 78/ 10
have heard, and finally to beseech His Grace that 2, 78/ 12
his eye of pity to behold the long-continued distress 2, 78/ 14
of the same and to set his gracious hands 2, 78/ 14
set his gracious hands to the redress and amendment 2, 78/ 16
of this realm, according to his right and title 2, 78/ 19
descended unto him, and to the laud of God 2, 78/ 20
that were so glad to live under his obeisance 2, 78/ 23
things by them alleged to be true, yet such 2, 78/ 26
heart in this point to incline to their desire 2, 78/ 30
this point to incline to their desire. For in 2, 78/ 30
ambitious mind and device to depose the Prince and 2, 78/ 32
and pain than pleasure to him that so would 2, 78/ 35
not were not worthy to have it. Notwithstanding, he 2, 79/ 2
them for his sake to give and bear the 2, 79/ 4
and bear the same to the Prince, under whom 2, 79/ 5
and would be content to live; and with his 2, 79/ 6
should like the King to use him, he would 2, 79/ 7
do his uttermost devoir to set the realm in 2, 79/ 7
protectorship (the praise given to God) well begun, in 2, 79/ 9
and of new intended to be, were now, partly 2, 79/ 10
was now no surety to retreat, as for that 2, 79/ 18
for the weal universal to take that way although 2, 79/ 19
would like His Grace to take the crown upon 2, 79/ 21
them a resolute answer to the contrary, which they 2, 79/ 22
they would be loath to hear, then must they 2, 79/ 23
and should not fail to find some other nobleman 2, 79/ 24
wise, King Edward's line to govern them, whom no 2, 79/ 31
no man is there to whom the crown can 2, 79/ 32
just title appertain as to ourself, as very right 2, 79/ 33
late Duke of York; to which title is now 2, 80/ 2
content, and agree favorably to incline to your petition 2, 80/ 5
agree favorably to incline to your petition and request 2, 80/ 5
and request, and, according to the same, here we 2, 80/ 7
us and our heirs to rule, govern, and defend 2, 80/ 10
and your good help, to get again and subdue 2, 80/ 11
ask of God longer to live than we intend 2, 80/ 15
live than we intend to procure." With this there 2, 80/ 16
the lords went up to the King (for so 2, 80/ 17
bulls, that he purposeth to be one, and though 2, 80/ 28
con so little good to show out of season 2, 81/ 2
his tormentors might hap to break his head -- 2, 81/ 5
a great train, went to Westminster Hall, and there 2, 81/ 12
the King's Bench, declared to the audience that he 2, 81/ 19
duty of a king to minister the laws. Then 2, 81/ 22
could, he went about to win unto him the 2, 81/ 23
realm. And finally -- to the intent that no 2, 81/ 25
committed against him. And to the intent that he 2, 81/ 31
in a manner dejected to a servile flattery. When 2, 82/ 4
most righteous (that is to wit, his own), so 2, 82/ 16
place more at large to treat if we hereafter 2, 82/ 32
if we hereafter happen to write the time of 2, 83/ 1
coronation, taking his way to Gloucester to visit in 2, 83/ 8
his way to Gloucester to visit in his new 2, 83/ 8
devised, as he rode, to fulfill that thing which 2, 83/ 9
he could have right to the realm, he thought 2, 83/ 12
thought therefore without delay to rid them -- as 2, 83/ 12
put the two children to death. This John Green 2, 83/ 18
would never put them to death, to die therefor 2, 83/ 21
put them to death, to die therefor; with which 2, 83/ 21
returning, recounted the same to King Richard at Warwick 2, 83/ 22
I dare well say, to do Your Grace pleasure 2, 83/ 28
for nature's gifts, worthy to have served a much 2, 84/ 1
he took his time to put him forward and 2, 84/ 11
said the King merrily to them, "What, sirs? Be 2, 84/ 18
up Sir James, broke to him secretly his mind 2, 84/ 19
morrow, he sent him to Brackenbury with a letter 2, 84/ 21
which he was commanded to deliver Sir James all 2, 84/ 22
Tower for one night, to the end he might 2, 84/ 23
the night next ensuing to destroy them, devising before 2, 84/ 26
Prince, sore abashed, began to sigh and said, "Alas 2, 85/ 1
William Slaughter") except, set to serve them and see 2, 85/ 6
murdered in their beds. To the execution whereof, he 2, 85/ 11
fleshed in murder beforetime. To him he joined one 2, 85/ 14
failing, they gave up to God their innocent souls 2, 85/ 21
joys of heaven, leaving to the tormentors their bodies 2, 85/ 22
long lying still -- to be thoroughly dead, they 2, 85/ 26
and fetched Sir James to see them. Which, upon 2, 85/ 27
them, caused those murderers to bury them at the 2, 85/ 28
James in great haste to King Richard, and showed 2, 86/ 1
could never since come to light. Very truth is 2, 86/ 9
and little cause had to lie, were these two 2, 86/ 14
great wealth, likely long to live to reign and 2, 86/ 16
likely long to live to reign and rule in 2, 86/ 17
dispiteous cruelty. For first to begin with the ministers 2, 86/ 24
-- in good possibility to be hanged ere he 2, 87/ 3
like one always ready to strike again. He took 2, 87/ 15
of King Edward, came to York and there had 2, 88/ 3
trusty servant, who came to John Ward, a chamberer 2, 88/ 5
he might be admitted to the presence and speech 2, 88/ 7
all other folk voided, to be brought unto him 2, 88/ 10
had secretly sent him to show him that in 2, 88/ 12
of the north country (to the number of six 2, 88/ 17
come on his way to Londonward. And after secret 2, 88/ 18
Duke of Hereford's lands, to which he pretended himself 2, 89/ 9
interlaced with the title to the crown by the 2, 89/ 12
never after could endure to look aright on King 2, 89/ 15
part, sent him word to rise and come ride 2, 89/ 19
the Duke verily looked to have been murdered at 2, 89/ 24
never have suffered him to escape his hands. Very 2, 90/ 9
ease, and that both to King Richard well known 2, 90/ 14
after his coming home to Brecknock, having there in 2, 90/ 18
wisdom abused his pride to his own deliverance and 2, 90/ 21
lacking no wise ways to win favor. He had 2, 90/ 23
never came home but to the field. After which 2, 91/ 1
not only was content to receive him, but also 2, 91/ 2
but also wooed him to come, and had him 2, 91/ 3
tyrant for his troth to the King -- found 2, 91/ 6
-- found the means to set this duke in 2, 91/ 6
declared, and good service, to both his masters at 2, 91/ 9
once, with infinite benefit to the realm by the 2, 91/ 10
fled the realm, went to Rome, never minding more 2, 91/ 12
Rome, never minding more to meddle with the world 2, 91/ 12
as I was about to tell you, by the 2, 91/ 18
now this duke glad to common with him, fed 2, 91/ 21
thereby feeling him easy to fall out if the 2, 91/ 25
craftily sought the ways to prick him forward -- 2, 91/ 26
he rather seemed him to follow him than to 2, 92/ 2
to follow him than to lead him. For when 2, 92/ 2
the Duke first began to praise and boast the 2, 92/ 3
were it for me to lie; for if I 2, 92/ 5
God had ordered him to lose it, and King 2, 92/ 8
it, and King Edward to reign -- I was 2, 92/ 9
quick. So was I to King Edward faithful chaplain 2, 92/ 10
provided, I purpose not to spurn against a prick 2, 92/ 13
a prick nor labor to set up that God 2, 92/ 13
longed the Duke sore to hear what he would 2, 92/ 17
familiarly between the twain, to be bold to say 2, 92/ 19
twain, to be bold to say whatsoever he thought 2, 92/ 19
and that himself intended to use his faithful, secret 2, 92/ 22
procured of the King to have him in his 2, 92/ 24
I love not much to talk much of princes 2, 92/ 27
it pleaseth the prince to construe it. And ever 2, 93/ 1
that I was about to say, taken as well 2, 93/ 14
it would, might happen to turn me to little 2, 93/ 15
happen to turn me to little good and you 2, 93/ 16
little good and you to less." Then longed the 2, 93/ 16
Duke yet much more to wit what it was 2, 93/ 17
possession, I purpose not to dispute his title. But 2, 93/ 19
member, I was about to wish that to those 2, 93/ 21
about to wish that to those good abilities whereof 2, 93/ 21
for the better store, to have given him some 2, 93/ 23