VI.....................4
had deposed King Henry VI and was in peaceable 2, 60/ 3
wife unto King Henry VI, was married unto one 2, 60/ 18
up again King Henry VI, which was before by 2, 65/ 28
death of King Henry VI, entailed by authority of 2, 67/ 10
 
 VIAND..................1
from enemies or ill viand, but partly also in 2, 26/ 7
 
 VICIOUS................2
things as in the vicious living and inordinate abusion 2, 53/ 24
of heaven into this vicious world for the amendment 2, 54/ 26
 
 VICTORIES..............1
than for peace. Sundry victories had he, and sometimes 2, 8/ 1
 
 VICTORY................1
again and had the victory, then went I hence 2, 39/ 19
 
 VICTUAL................1
at Westminster, and much victual killed therefor that afterward 2, 47/ 1
 
 VII....................2
famous prince King Henry VII, both Dighton and he 2, 86/ 11
noble prince King Henry VII got him home again 2, 91/ 13
 
 VILE...................2
unto Shore's wife, a vile and abominable strumpet, than 2, 71/ 32
that burying in so vile a corner, saying that 2, 86/ 3
 
 VILLAINY...............1
to have such a villainy done them. And, all 2, 72/ 16
 
 VIOLATE................1
durst that sacred place violate, or so holy a 2, 28/ 8
 
 VIOLENCE...............1
many, and was without violence, and, over that, in 2, 4/ 24
 
 VIOLET.................1
of the citizens in violet, received him reverently at 2, 24/ 19
 
 VIRTUE.................4
Bridget, which, representing the virtue of her whose name 2, 3/ 10
worthy her birth and virtue. This noble prince deceased 2, 3/ 17
of more learning than virtue, of more fame than 2, 58/ 25
that he set her virtue in the stead of 2, 61/ 27
 
 VIRTUES................4
no part of his virtues was more esteemed, yet 2, 5/ 9
nature, as many princely virtues, as much goodly towardness 2, 5/ 26
prowess pondered, with manifold virtues which in his noble 2, 74/ 4
of such other excellent virtues meet for the rule 2, 93/ 24
 
 VIRTUOUS...............3
corrupt intent than any virtuous affection. This woman was 2, 55/ 6
him -- from whose virtuous conditions he said also 2, 67/ 26
thereto so good and virtuous that he would not 2, 73/ 6
 
 VIRTUOUSLY.............1
when she perceived, she virtuously denied him. But that 2, 61/ 16
 
 VISAGE.................7
vanquished. He was of visage lovely, of body mighty 2, 4/ 17
his right, hard-favored of visage, and such as is 2, 7/ 21
whoso well advise her visage might guess and devise 2, 55/ 32
and favor of his visage" represented "the very face 2, 67/ 29
very print of his visage, the sure, undoubted image 2, 67/ 31
and favor of his visage representeth the very face 2, 68/ 17
very print of his visage, the sure, undoubted image 2, 68/ 19
 
 VISIT..................1
way to Gloucester to visit in his new honor 2, 83/ 8
 
 VITULAMINA.............1
for his theme "Spuria vitulamina non agent radices altas 2, 66/ 27
 
 VOICE..................6
manner, with none other voice or semblance, than to 2, 23/ 29
sermon so lost his voice that he was fain 2, 59/ 2
clear and a loud voice, in this manner of 2, 69/ 10
evidently and plainly, with voice, gesture, and countenance so 2, 75/ 11
themselves secretly, that the voice was neither loud nor 2, 76/ 14
every man with one voice, no man saying nay 2, 76/ 27
 
 VOID...................1
he was fain to void the realm and flee 2, 65/ 17
 
 VOIDED.................2
his wisdom where he voided than his manhood where 2, 4/ 16
after all other folk voided, to be brought unto 2, 88/ 9
 
 VOIDING................1
all best, in the voiding of all manner of 2, 33/ 24
 
 VOLUPTUOUS.............1
that he set his voluptuous pleasure before his honor 2, 73/ 18
 
 VOUCHSAFE..............2
ween that they would vouchsafe to have put upon 2, 52/ 29
humbly besought him to vouchsafe that they might resort 2, 77/ 24
 
 VOYAGE.................1
well if all his voyage were in such wise 2, 62/ 7
 
 W......................1
of his oath. So w So was he brought 2, 49/ 20
 
 WAIT...................1
as he would, and wait upon him with a 2, 88/ 13
 
 WAKE...................1
they letted not to wake him, nor he to 2, 21/ 8
 
 WAKEFIELD..............1
of the realm at Wakefield slain, leaving three sons 2, 6/ 24
 
 WAKING.................1
a nights, lay long waking and musing, sore wearied 2, 87/ 16
 
 WALES..................2
household at Ludlow, in Wales. Which country, being far 2, 14/ 2
country, keep household in Wales, far out of your 2, 35/ 31
 
 WALK...................1
lands (as evil words walk far) -- that the 2, 26/ 19
 
 WALKETH................1
away. Dighton, indeed, yet walketh alive -- in good 2, 87/ 2
 
 WALKING................1
wild, robbers and reavers walking at liberty, uncorrected. And 2, 14/ 5
 
 WALL...................1
their face to the wall while the dolor of 2, 77/ 5
 
 WALLS..................1
some breaking down the walls to bring in the 2, 21/ 24
 
 WANTON.................5
with the King in wanton company. Her kindred also 2, 11/ 3
ease, pleasure, and other wanton wealth -- was able 2, 55/ 16
King, or for that wanton women and wealthy be 2, 56/ 24
only for a little wanton dotage upon her person 2, 62/ 12
the King for his wanton lust and sinful affection 2, 72/ 2
 
 WANTONNESS.............1
greatly given to fleshly wantonness -- from which health 2, 4/ 20
 
 WAR....................11
of peace (for in war each party must needs 2, 3/ 21
just and merciful, in war sharp and fierce, in 2, 4/ 13
of outward enemies, no war in hand, nor none 2, 4/ 27
mighty, began not by war, but by law, to 2, 6/ 14
was he in the war, as to which his 2, 7/ 30
to fall themselves at war ere their discretion would 2, 11/ 17
in manner, of open war -- whereof the end 2, 16/ 9
that will be at war with women. Would God 2, 28/ 23
common adventure of open war, which albeit that it 2, 71/ 9
France. In which inward war among ourselves hath been 2, 71/ 19
not much surer than war. So that no time 2, 71/ 24
 
 WARBECK................1
that only that Perkin Warbeck, by many folks' malice 2, 82/ 22
 
 WARD...................5
and put him in ward, and, that done, forthwith 2, 18/ 25
He is also my ward; for, as my learned 2, 38/ 28
I suppose, take my ward from me out of 2, 38/ 31
though I were a ward that were bound to 2, 63/ 33
who came to John Ward, a chamberer of like 2, 88/ 5
 
 WARE...................1
much, be you well ware that you fear not 2, 42/ 7
 
 WARILY.................1
make them the more warily to look to him 2, 41/ 11
 
 WARLIKE................1
is in states called warlike, in other men otherwise 2, 7/ 21
 
 WARN...................1
it. Which room, I warn you well, is no 2, 74/ 16
 
 WARNED.................1
by their friends secretly warned that it might haply 2, 45/ 2
 
 WARNING................2
that followeth was no warning, but an enemious scorn 2, 50/ 32
so suddenly, without any warning or knowledge whether they 2, 77/ 19
 
 WARNINGS...............1
to hear, either the warnings of that he should 2, 49/ 25
 
 WARRANT................1
said, "My lord, I warrant you, neither the lion 2, 93/ 11
 
 WARRIOR................1
man and a courageous warrior, and of such strength 2, 65/ 30
 
 WARS...................2
wisdom would, adventurous. Whose wars, whoso well consider, he 2, 4/ 15
jeopardies in all his wars, bore ever your special 2, 72/ 28
 
 WARWICK................10
embassage the Earl of Warwick, with other noblemen in 2, 60/ 6
thing the Earl of Warwick found the parties so 2, 60/ 9
and the Earl of Warwick being in his embassage 2, 60/ 24
that the Earl of Warwick had so far moved 2, 62/ 6
that my cousin of Warwick neither loveth me so 2, 63/ 29
when the Earl of Warwick understood of this marriage 2, 65/ 13
meantime the Earl of Warwick took out of prison 2, 65/ 27
of the Earl of Warwick, which was a wise 2, 65/ 29
slew the Earl of Warwick with many other great 2, 66/ 4
to King Richard at Warwick, yet in his way 2, 83/ 22