WAS....................284
whose fortune and grace was after to be queen 2, 3/ 8
close nuns; Anne, that was after honorably married unto 2, 3/ 12
people from thence conveyed, was interred at Windsor. A 2, 3/ 20
other's enemy) that there was never any prince of 2, 3/ 22
Sixth, whom he deposed, was well assuaged, and in 2, 4/ 5
favor, of which he was never strange. He was 2, 4/ 8
was never strange. He was a goodly personage and 2, 4/ 9
where he vanquished. He was of visage lovely, of 2, 4/ 17
nevertheless not uncomely; he was of youth greatly given 2, 4/ 19
of very many, and was without violence, and, over 2, 4/ 24
latter days, this realm was in quiet and prosperous 2, 4/ 26
of his reign, he was with his people so 2, 5/ 7
part of his virtues was more esteemed, yet that 2, 5/ 9
in which his life was most desired; whose love 2, 5/ 23
manner of man this was, that could find in 2, 6/ 11
Parliament. Where his cause was, either for right or 2, 6/ 16
utterly rejected, the crown was by authority of Parliament 2, 6/ 18
in King Harry's life, was with many nobles of 2, 6/ 24
George, Duke of Clarence, was a goodly, noble prince 2, 7/ 2
the leastwise, heinous treason was there laid to his 2, 7/ 9
were he faultless, attainted was he by Parliament, and 2, 7/ 11
when he wist it was done, piteously bewailed and 2, 7/ 14
whom we now treat, was in wit and courage 2, 7/ 17
other men otherwise. He was malicious, wrathful, envious, and 2, 7/ 22
committed. None evil captain was he in the war 2, 7/ 30
to which his disposition was more meetly than for 2, 8/ 1
or politic order. Free was he called of dispense 2, 8/ 3
friendship, for which he was fain to pill and 2, 8/ 5
him steadfast hatred. He was close and secret, a 2, 8/ 7
estate. Friend and foe was muchwhat indifferent: where his 2, 8/ 12
for this intent he was glad of his brother's 2, 9/ 1
Cripplegate; and when he was with hasty rapping quickly 2, 9/ 10
Pottier that King Edward was departed. "By my troth 2, 9/ 12
inkling thereof. For he was not likely to speak 2, 9/ 16
foreminded this conclusion, or was now at erst thereunto 2, 9/ 21
should be (as it was indeed) a furtherly beginning 2, 10/ 1
For of one thing was he certain: that if 2, 10/ 8
blessed Lady" -- that was ever his oath -- 2, 13/ 5
toward them; and none was there present that could 2, 13/ 25
soon as the King was departed, the noble Prince 2, 13/ 31
and recourse to justice, was begun to be far 2, 14/ 4
this encheason the Prince was in the life of 2, 14/ 6
at his sending thither, was there appointed Sir Anthony 2, 14/ 10
effect everyone as he was nearest of kin unto 2, 14/ 15
unto the Queen, so was planted next about the 2, 14/ 15
messengers, that it neither was reason nor in any 2, 14/ 22
saving the King's pleasure, was full unmeet to be 2, 14/ 28
Edward himself, albeit he was a man of age 2, 15/ 4
and of discretion, yet was he in many things 2, 15/ 5
the end, he wist, was doubtful, and in which 2, 16/ 9
should ensue -- which was likely not to be 2, 16/ 25
a sober company. Now was the King in his 2, 17/ 7
ere he departed. So was there made that night 2, 17/ 15
he began (as he was a very well-spoken man 2, 18/ 22
for them, because it was too strait for both 2, 18/ 29
dealing he wept and was nothing content, but it 2, 20/ 2
to whom such adversity was strange. But himself had 2, 20/ 8
the King her son was taken; her brother, her 2, 20/ 20
he trusted the matter was nothing so sore as 2, 21/ 30
for, and that he was put in good hope 2, 22/ 2
could pass unsearched. Then was there great commotion and 2, 22/ 16
be ascribed (as it was indeed) to his overmuch 2, 22/ 29
the Duke of Gloucester was sure and fastly faithful 2, 23/ 5
obloquy in which he was so late before, he 2, 24/ 25
so late before, he was suddenly fallen in so 2, 24/ 26
Council next assembled, he was made the only man 2, 24/ 27
it folly, the lamb was betaken to the wolf 2, 24/ 30
Seal to the Queen, was thereof greatly reproved, and 2, 25/ 3
unto them that it was an heinous deed of 2, 25/ 20
reproach, perceive that it was only malice, frowardness, or 2, 27/ 13
affirmed that the motion was good and reasonable, and 2, 27/ 20
and which holy ground was more than five hundred 2, 28/ 2
from that time hitherward was there never so undevout 2, 28/ 7
perceive that this errand was not one man's mind 2, 33/ 31
convey him; which she was likely to mind after 2, 34/ 3
unto her that it was thought unto the Protector 2, 34/ 7
brother in that place was the thing which highly 2, 34/ 9
in company as it was their both dishonor, and 2, 34/ 13
in the recidivation that was in the first sickness 2, 35/ 11
company -- Your Grace was well content therewith yourself 2, 35/ 31
like; for the one was then in health, and 2, 35/ 33
her noble person, neither was nor could be any 2, 37/ 2
this, the sanctuary whereof was there never tyrant yet 2, 37/ 31
adversaries as ever he was. But my son can 2, 38/ 2
other son, now king, was born and kept in 2, 39/ 13
my lord my husband was banished and thrust out 2, 39/ 16
reigning, as this place was sometime to the king's 2, 39/ 23
he neither believed and was also loath to hear 2, 40/ 11
well she wist it was either needless or bootless 2, 41/ 5
might be deceived, so was she well assured they 2, 41/ 9
thought that this duke was privy to all the 2, 42/ 29
said that the Duke was the first mover of 2, 42/ 31
half increased. The matter was broken unto the Duke 2, 43/ 9
that the young king was offended with him for 2, 43/ 11
their deaths whose imprisonment was grievous unto him. And 2, 43/ 16
nothing avail, for there was no way left to 2, 43/ 17
attempted. And that it was likely that as the 2, 43/ 22
own commodity. Then it was agreed that the Protector 2, 44/ 1
the Lord Stanley, that was after Earl of Derby 2, 45/ 10
he by Catesby, which was was of his near 2, 45/ 20
by Catesby, which was was of his near, secret 2, 45/ 20
he well wist there was no man to him 2, 45/ 23
so much beholden as was this Catesby, which was 2, 45/ 23
was this Catesby, which was a man well-learned in 2, 45/ 25
But surely great pity was it that he had 2, 45/ 28
council intended where Catesby was. And of truth, the 2, 46/ 4
him well, and loath was to have lost him 2, 46/ 10
the only desire whereof was the allective that induced 2, 46/ 24
killed therefor that afterward was cast away. These lords 2, 47/ 1
But the Lord Hastings was in his mind better 2, 47/ 32
better content that it was moved by her than 2, 47/ 32
somewhat grudged that he was not before made of 2, 48/ 1
this matter, as he was of the taking of 2, 48/ 2
day, in which he was not aware that it 2, 48/ 5
not aware that it was by others devised that 2, 48/ 5
small -- as it was never other. And thereupon 2, 48/ 11
perceiving that this matter was but a quarrel. For 2, 48/ 12
wist that the Queen was too wise to go 2, 48/ 14
And also, no man was there present but well 2, 48/ 18
knew that his harm was ever such since his 2, 48/ 18
oath. So w So was he brought forth into 2, 49/ 20
with him, for he was disposed utterly no longer 2, 49/ 32
his heart that he was thoroughly determined no longer 2, 50/ 7
morning in which he was beheaded, his horse twice 2, 50/ 27
Now this that followeth was no warning, but an 2, 50/ 32
thitherward, with whom he was of secret confederacy in 2, 51/ 3
little mistrusted, that he was never merrier nor never 2, 51/ 11
place where his head was off so soon after 2, 51/ 15
in that place, he was put in remembrance of 2, 51/ 16
such wise that he was for the while (but 2, 51/ 21
same place while he was therein. And therefore he 2, 52/ 1
man," quoth he, "I was never so sorry, nor 2, 52/ 9
he most feared, he was in good surety; when 2, 52/ 14
what they intended further was as yet not well-known 2, 53/ 3
uncontrolled. And much matter was there in the proclamation 2, 53/ 19
Chamberlain, as that he was an evil counselor to 2, 53/ 21
with Shore's wife, which was one also of his 2, 53/ 26
death; so that it was the less marvel if 2, 53/ 28
ending -- which he was now put unto by 2, 53/ 29
quiet and peace. Now was this proclamation made within 2, 54/ 3
hours after that he was beheaded, and it was 2, 54/ 4
was beheaded, and it was so curiously indited, and 2, 54/ 4
well perceive that it was prepared before. For all 2, 54/ 6
proclaiming thereof, one that was schoolmaster of Paul's, of 2, 54/ 10
answered him that it was written by prophecy. Now 2, 54/ 13
him and that she was of counsel with the 2, 54/ 19
all the world wist was true, and that nevertheless 2, 54/ 22
highly taken: that she was naught of her body 2, 54/ 24
virtuous affection. This woman was born in London, worshipfully 2, 55/ 7
she never longed. Which was haply the thing that 2, 55/ 12
other wanton wealth -- was able soon to pierce 2, 55/ 16
her husband (as he was an honest man and 2, 55/ 17
King's days, albeit he was sore enamored upon her 2, 55/ 21
friendly faithfulness. Proper she was and fair -- nothing 2, 55/ 23
properties. But the merriest was this Shore's wife, in 2, 56/ 12
either for that she was content with the deed 2, 56/ 22
to show what she was able to do with 2, 56/ 23
had not been. Now was it so devised by 2, 57/ 14
which the Lord Chamberlain was beheaded in the Tower 2, 57/ 16
about the selfsame hour, was there (not without his 2, 57/ 17
Stony Stratford. Which thing was done in the presence 2, 57/ 20
to resist. But now was all the study by 2, 58/ 10
own advancement (whereof he was, of a proud heart 2, 58/ 18
his voice that he was fain to leave off 2, 59/ 3
many think, that Penker was not of counsel of 2, 59/ 8
namely since his sermon was not incontinent upon it 2, 59/ 10
it that Doctor Shaa was of counsel in the 2, 59/ 11
ghostly purpose. But now was all the labor and 2, 59/ 15
Protector's own mother, which was mother to them both 2, 59/ 25
that his own mother was an adulteress -- which 2, 59/ 27
King Henry VI and was in peaceable possession of 2, 60/ 3
to marry (as it was requisite both for himself 2, 60/ 4
Dame Elizabeth Grey (which was after his queen), at 2, 60/ 14
by her mother, which was Duchess of Bedford ere 2, 60/ 16
unto King Henry VI, was married unto one John 2, 60/ 18
that knighthood, for he was at the same field 2, 60/ 23
speak -- as she was both fair, of a 2, 61/ 6
her. And after he was thus appointed, and had 2, 61/ 29
of York, his mother, was so sore moved therewith 2, 62/ 1
might, alleging that it was his honor, profit, and 2, 62/ 2
said also that it was not princely to marry 2, 62/ 9
yet therein, she said, was more honesty, than honor 2, 62/ 14
whose person, albeit there was nothing to be misliked 2, 62/ 17
to be misliked, yet was there, she said, "nothing 2, 62/ 17
take it well, yet was at a point in 2, 63/ 4
as he trusted it was in his, than for 2, 63/ 8
marriage even worldly considered was not unprofitable. For he 2, 63/ 9
it yet that it was forbidden a prince." The 2, 64/ 19
conscience, that the King was sure to Dame Elizabeth 2, 64/ 28
which words, such obstacle was made in the matter 2, 64/ 30
Whereupon Dame Elizabeth Lucy was sent for. And albeit 2, 64/ 33
And albeit that she was by the King's mother 2, 64/ 34
to affirm that she was ensured unto the King 2, 65/ 1
King, yet when she was solemnly sworn to say 2, 65/ 2
solemnly taken, when it was clearly perceived that there 2, 65/ 7
clearly perceived that there was none impediment, the King 2, 65/ 7
her crowned queen that was his enemy's wife and 2, 65/ 10
highly that his embassage was deluded that for very 2, 65/ 14
to resist, that he was fain to void the 2, 65/ 17
in sanctuary, where she was delivered of Edward, the 2, 65/ 24
King Henry VI, which was before by King Edward 2, 65/ 28
Earl of Warwick, which was a wise man and 2, 65/ 29
invention, simple as it was, it liked them to 2, 66/ 13
to show you, it was by the Protector and 2, 66/ 15
also, Dame Elizabeth Lucy was verily the wife of 2, 66/ 22
crown, to whom it was, after the death of 2, 67/ 10
his body lawfully begotten, was only the Lord Protector 2, 67/ 12
then that King Edward was never lawfully married unto 2, 67/ 13
unto the Queen, but was before God husband unto 2, 67/ 14
also that King Edward was far off. But the 2, 67/ 27
that noble duke." Now was it before devised that 2, 67/ 33
after said that he was specially chosen by God 2, 68/ 6
matter thereto -- he was come to them and 2, 68/ 11
matter with which he was in hand and, without 2, 68/ 13
answered him that there was in every man's mouth 2, 68/ 32
up, and (as he was neither unlearned and of 2, 69/ 8
in doubt. For who was there of you all 2, 69/ 23
grins and traps as was set therefor, among so 2, 69/ 25
tallages, of which there was never end and oftentimes 2, 69/ 27
charge. So that there was daily pilled, from good 2, 69/ 29
asked little, but everything was hawsed above the measure 2, 70/ 4
Burdet were forgotten, that was for a word spoken 2, 70/ 14
names. And also there was no crime so great 2, 71/ 1
the King's enemies; which was, at one time and 2, 71/ 6
so deadly fought, as was in the king's days 2, 71/ 15
So that no time was there in which rich 2, 71/ 25
well all: that whoso was best bore always least 2, 71/ 31
rule, and more suit was in his days unto 2, 71/ 31
-- which simple woman was well-named and honest till 2, 72/ 1
the King's greedy appetite was insatiable, and everywhere over 2, 72/ 5
intolerable. For no woman was there anywhere, young or 2, 72/ 7
importable dealing the realm was in every part annoyed 2, 72/ 17
since that near hereabout was commonly his most abiding 2, 72/ 21
wife, Dame Elizabeth Lucy) was never lawfully married unto 2, 73/ 17
pleasure before his honor, was full unmeet to be 2, 73/ 19
King Richard!" -- all was hushed and mute, and 2, 75/ 3
thereunto. Wherewith the Duke was marvelously abashed, and taking 2, 75/ 4
first, not one word was there answered of all 2, 75/ 15
stood before, but all was as still as the 2, 75/ 16
seem to common what was best to do. When 2, 75/ 18
and an honest, which was so newly come into 2, 75/ 25
before -- and loath was with that matter to 2, 75/ 26
secretly, that the voice was neither loud nor distinct 2, 76/ 14
purpose and said it was a goodly cry and 2, 76/ 27
the Protector, as he was very gentle of himself 2, 78/ 5
one, of which he was never desirous, that he 2, 78/ 29
Prince, under whom he was and would be content 2, 79/ 5
in good state. Which was already in this little 2, 79/ 8
conclusion, that the realm was appointed King Edward's line 2, 79/ 16
far gone that it was now no surety to 2, 79/ 18
when he saw there was none other way but 2, 79/ 27
procure." With this there was a great shout crying 2, 80/ 16
the King (for so was he from that time 2, 80/ 18
dealing, that the matter was on both parts made 2, 80/ 21
themselves well wist there was no man so dull 2, 80/ 23
that all the matter was made between them. Howbeit 2, 80/ 24
he considered that it was the chiefest duty of 2, 81/ 21
this mockish "election"), then was he crowned the sixth 2, 82/ 9
July. And that solemnity was furnished for the most 2, 82/ 10
the selfsame provision that was appointed for the coronation 2, 82/ 11
space abusing the world, was as well with princes 2, 82/ 24
another meant, that there was nothing so plainly and 2, 82/ 27
Sir James Tyrell, which was a man of right 2, 83/ 30
letter by which he was commanded to deliver Sir 2, 84/ 22
he could. But forthwith was the Prince and his 2, 85/ 4
as Sir James Tyrell was in the Tower for 2, 86/ 10
the chamber -- so was his restless heart continually 2, 87/ 19
of six hundred horses), was come on his way 2, 88/ 18
he claimed by inheritance was somewhat interlaced with the 2, 89/ 11
King Richard said it was done in hatred and 2, 89/ 22
it is, the Duke was an high-minded man, and 2, 90/ 10
time as the crown was first set upon the 2, 90/ 12
men say that he was of truth not well 2, 90/ 14
as ye before heard, was taken in the council 2, 90/ 19
Duke's destruction. The Bishop was a man of great 2, 90/ 22
Henry while that part was in wealth, and nevertheless 2, 90/ 24
and wisdom, not only was content to receive him 2, 91/ 2
man, therefore, as I was about to tell you 2, 91/ 18
to reign -- I was never so mad that 2, 92/ 9
against the quick. So was I to King Edward 2, 92/ 10
-- which he said was the only cause for 2, 92/ 23
the thing that I was about to say, taken 2, 93/ 14
to wit what it was. Whereupon the Bishop said 2, 93/ 17
one poor member, I was about to wish that 2, 93/ 21