WESTMINSTER............8
eight days, died at Westminster the ninth day of 2, 3/ 4
at his palace of Westminster, and with great funeral 2, 3/ 18
of the Palace of Westminster, in which she then 2, 20/ 30
place not far from Westminster. And for that he 2, 21/ 5
the Star Chamber at Westminster. And the Lord Cardinal 2, 33/ 26
day and night at Westminster, and much victual killed 2, 46/ 32
his new wife in Westminster, in sanctuary, where she 2, 65/ 23
great train, went to Westminster Hall, and there, when 2, 81/ 12
 
 WHARF..................1
Upon the very Tower wharf, so near the place 2, 51/ 14
 
 WHAT...................62
ere we farther go, what manner of man this 2, 6/ 11
of Gloucester, be king!" What cause he had so 2, 9/ 13
kinsmen and allies, in what plight I lie, you 2, 11/ 12
moved to care in what case I leave you 2, 11/ 14
of debate and dissension, what loss, what sorrow, what 2, 12/ 28
and dissension, what loss, what sorrow, what trouble hath 2, 12/ 28
what loss, what sorrow, what trouble hath within these 2, 13/ 1
the more beware by what occasion we have taken 2, 13/ 7
to them and inquire what this matter might mean 2, 18/ 18
words the King answered, "What my brother Marquis hath 2, 19/ 18
done with God wot what. With which tidings the 2, 20/ 21
on the other side, what a sort there be 2, 30/ 26
hath brought to naught. "What a rabble of thieves 2, 30/ 28
ago I wot ne'er what pope and what prince 2, 31/ 20
ne'er what pope and what prince more piteous than 2, 31/ 20
need to require it. What will, then, hath yonder 2, 32/ 16
say very truth. And what if a man's wife 2, 32/ 33
out -- and in what place could I reckon 2, 37/ 29
they could nothing perceive what the Protector intended; troth 2, 40/ 21
in one place. For what wise merchant adventureth all 2, 41/ 31
though they neither wist what they feared nor wherefore 2, 44/ 24
he showed few men what he knew. Howbeit, somewhat 2, 44/ 29
of sudden change, and what thing should him ail 2, 47/ 19
while, thus he began: "What were they worthy to 2, 47/ 21
shall all see in what wise that sorceress and 2, 48/ 7
be worthy heinous punishment. "What?" quoth the Protector. "Thou 2, 48/ 24
I arrest thee, traitor!" "What? Me, my lord?" quoth 2, 48/ 31
said merrily to him, "What, my lord! I pray 2, 51/ 7
little wist the other what he meant, and so 2, 51/ 10
in the Council. And what they intended further was 2, 53/ 2
unto and to show what she was able to 2, 56/ 23
-- while men mused what the matter meant, while 2, 58/ 5
while no man wist what to think nor whom 2, 58/ 7
all the study by what means this matter, being 2, 58/ 11
and of such strength, what for his lands, his 2, 65/ 30
been his old friend what the people talked of 2, 68/ 30
cost, adventure, or jeopardy. What thing is that? Certes 2, 69/ 20
man should pay, not what himself of his good 2, 70/ 3
list to grant, but what the King of his 2, 70/ 3
flattery, gave that judgment. What? Cook, your own worshipful 2, 70/ 21
worshipful man's loss -- what speak we of loss 2, 70/ 26
and by whose occasion, what about the getting of 2, 71/ 16
own brother could not? What manner of folk he 2, 71/ 29
no man better wotteth what he should say, and 2, 73/ 5
election. Wherein, dear friends, what mind you have, we 2, 74/ 33
said unto them softly, "What meaneth this, that these 2, 75/ 6
might seem to common what was best to do 2, 75/ 18
them till he wist what they meant. And thereupon 2, 77/ 29
longed sore to wit what they meant, gave him 2, 78/ 6
him leave to purpose what him liked, verily trusting 2, 78/ 7
sake not be acknown what they know. For at 2, 80/ 27
show out of season what acquaintance he hath with 2, 81/ 3
King merrily to them, "What, sirs? Be ye in 2, 84/ 18
notable example neither in what unsurety standeth this-worldly weal 2, 86/ 22
standeth this-worldly weal, or what mischief worketh the proud 2, 86/ 22
high heart, or, finally, what wretched end ensueth such 2, 86/ 24
both men considered, and what need in that green 2, 90/ 4
the Duke, and in what peril the Duke stood 2, 90/ 5
Duke sore to hear what he would have said 2, 92/ 17
made of horned beasts." "What, fool?" quoth the fox 2, 93/ 7
I well enough. But what an he call it 2, 93/ 9
much more to wit what it was. Whereupon the 2, 93/ 17
 
 WHATSOEVER.............4
it, because he thought, whatsoever business should fall between 2, 10/ 12
safe if I would, whatsoever any man say. And 2, 41/ 21
punished as heinous traitors, whatsoever they were. And all 2, 47/ 28
be bold to say whatsoever he thought: whereof he 2, 92/ 20
 
 WHEN...................65
albeit he commanded it), when he wist it was 2, 7/ 14
Street, without Cripplegate; and when he was with hasty 2, 9/ 10
in his last sickness, when he perceived his natural 2, 10/ 14
that they looked for. When these lords, with divers 2, 11/ 8
joined their hands together, when (as it after appeared 2, 13/ 30
London gone from Northampton, when these dukes of Gloucester 2, 17/ 8
their folk were attendant, when many of the Lord 2, 17/ 27
folk in hand. But when the Lord Rivers understood 2, 18/ 8
in his power. And when he began (as he 2, 18/ 22
alms to hang them. When the King approached near 2, 24/ 16
upon your better advices." When the Protector had said 2, 27/ 19
he breaketh no sanctuary." When the Duke had done 2, 33/ 20
any wise serve her. When the Queen and these 2, 34/ 6
beloved than they? -- when they hate them for 2, 37/ 5
have taken sanctuary; for when my lord my husband 2, 39/ 16
bore the Prince. And when my lord my husband 2, 39/ 18
Prince unto his father, when he first took him 2, 39/ 21
him need of sanctuary when he may not come 2, 40/ 4
go, for God knoweth when we shall kiss together 2, 42/ 10
child weeping as fast. When the Lord Cardinal and 2, 42/ 12
they never came abroad. When the Protector had both 2, 42/ 24
things before rehearsed. But when he had imprisoned the 2, 43/ 4
his household stuff. And when they were thus at 2, 44/ 8
should him ail. Then, when he had sat still 2, 47/ 19
great authority. This knight, when it happed the Lord 2, 51/ 5
Hastings, art you remembered when I met thee here 2, 52/ 2
life as I did when thou and I met 2, 52/ 10
of our mortal nature! When he most feared, he 2, 52/ 14
was in good surety; when he reckoned himself surest 2, 52/ 14
body to prison. And when he had a while 2, 54/ 18
him -- in conclusion, when that no color could 2, 54/ 20
penance than rejoiced therein, when they considered that the 2, 55/ 5
unto the King's appetite when he required her. Howbeit 2, 55/ 13
soft, tender heart. But when the King had abused 2, 55/ 17
up to him altogether. When the King died, the 2, 55/ 20
to the Queen. Now, when the Lord Chamberlain and 2, 58/ 3
her in jointure. Whom when the King beheld and 2, 61/ 5
more familiarly. Whose appetite when she perceived, she virtuously 2, 61/ 15
first marriage." The King, when his mother had said 2, 63/ 1
it in my way when I come to take 2, 64/ 18
unto the King, yet when she was solemnly sworn 2, 65/ 1
This examination solemnly taken, when it was clearly perceived 2, 65/ 7
her her boon. But when the Earl of Warwick 2, 65/ 13
take deep root." Thereupon when he had shown the 2, 66/ 29
be rooted deep. And when he had laid for 2, 67/ 5
the Protector came. Whom when he beheld coming, he 2, 68/ 12
like an owl. And when he once asked one 2, 68/ 29
talked no good, yet when the other answered him 2, 68/ 31
and so pestilent as when it happeneth among us 2, 71/ 12
wise man well perceived when he said, "Vae regno 2, 74/ 17
plainly to show us." When the Duke had said 2, 74/ 34
was best to do. When the Mayor saw this 2, 75/ 18
nothing they said. And when the Duke and the 2, 76/ 24
harm. Then the Duke, when he had showed this 2, 77/ 20
ought to be grieved. When the Duke had this 2, 78/ 9
this realm under his. When the Protector had heard 2, 78/ 24
have inclined thereunto. But when he saw there was 2, 79/ 27
with other thereof before, when that themselves well wist 2, 80/ 22
and play with them, when they cannot play their 2, 81/ 9
Westminster Hall, and there, when he had placed himself 2, 81/ 15
of the people -- when he had declared the 2, 81/ 27
to a servile flattery. When he had begun his 2, 82/ 8
so far forth that when the Protector rode through 2, 89/ 16
to lead him. For when the Duke first began 2, 92/ 2
on Aesop's tale, that when the lion had proclaimed 2, 93/ 2