WHOMSOEVER.............2
his unhappy building. For whomsoever he perceived either at 2, 14/ 19
In his return homeward, whomsoever he met he saluted 2, 82/ 3
 
 WHOSE..................47
two years younger; Elizabeth, whose fortune and grace was 2, 3/ 7
the virtue of her whose name she bore, professed 2, 3/ 10
than wisdom would, adventurous. Whose wars, whoso well consider 2, 4/ 14
life was most desired; whose love of his people 2, 5/ 23
a butt of malmsey, whose death King Edward (albeit 2, 7/ 13
spared no man's death whose life withstood his purpose 2, 8/ 13
the king his brother (whose life he looked that 2, 8/ 27
the Duke of Clarence, whose life must needs have 2, 9/ 2
up of the Prince, whose mind in tender youth 2, 11/ 30
than his mother's side, "whose blood," quoth he, "saving 2, 14/ 27
again for their defense whose power, she wist well 2, 16/ 23
meeting the Lord Hastings, whose troth toward the King 2, 23/ 3
King's brother from him, whose special pleasure and comfort 2, 25/ 22
noble presence -- in whose continual company he shall 2, 27/ 11
King's noble brother, to whose grace we besides be 2, 28/ 29
besides be of kin. Whose honor if she as 2, 28/ 29
that be here, of whose faithful mind she nothing 2, 29/ 3
the counsel of them whose wisdom she knoweth, whose 2, 29/ 10
whose wisdom she knoweth, whose troth she well trusteth 2, 29/ 10
noble prince is far, whose love to his king 2, 32/ 9
nature and kindred proveth; whose innocence, to all the 2, 32/ 10
to have it but whose conscience of his own 2, 32/ 15
malice to deserve it, whose life or liberty can 2, 33/ 13
King's royal majesty. To whose grace it were as 2, 34/ 12
the young duke himself, whose both great wealth it 2, 34/ 24
custody of them by whose death he may inherit 2, 39/ 32
careful for their deaths whose imprisonment was grievous unto 2, 43/ 16
body of King Edward; whose both souls our Lord 2, 49/ 24
commotion for his deliverance; whose hope now being by 2, 54/ 1
to have been well-visaged. Whose judgment seemeth me somewhat 2, 55/ 28
but her he loved; whose favor, to say the 2, 56/ 14
Sir Richard Radcliff, knight, whose service the Protector especially 2, 57/ 21
in talking more familiarly. Whose appetite when she perceived 2, 61/ 15
mind, as to him whose heart she perceived more 2, 61/ 22
and this widow. In whose person, albeit there was 2, 62/ 16
than him -- from whose virtuous conditions he said 2, 67/ 26
of the noble duke, whose remembrance can never die 2, 68/ 20
it his soul. In whose time and by whose 2, 71/ 16
whose time and by whose occasion, what about the 2, 71/ 16
Queen, their mother -- whose blood, saving that he 2, 73/ 18
and the mingling of whose bloods together hath been 2, 73/ 20
Duke of York, to whose royal blood the crown 2, 73/ 31
upon him, as he whose wisdom well perceiveth the 2, 74/ 13
and his tender brother. Whose death and final infortune 2, 82/ 19
namely not for him, whose pride, they wist, would 2, 84/ 8
waxed with him familiar. Whose wisdom abused his pride 2, 90/ 20
two bloods in one, whose several titles had long 2, 91/ 11
 
 WHOSO..................7
would, adventurous. Whose wars, whoso well consider, he shall 2, 4/ 15
there no certainty, and whoso divineth upon conjectures may 2, 9/ 6
conclusion of my mind: Whoso may have deserved to 2, 33/ 10
depart therewithal, and shift whoso would with this business 2, 40/ 17
yet, being even such, whoso well advise her visage 2, 55/ 32
it in marble; and whoso doth us a good 2, 57/ 5
you well all: that whoso was best bore always 2, 71/ 31
 
 WHOSOEVER..............2
can no more, but whosoever he be that breaketh 2, 40/ 2
shall come therewith to whosoever so well occupy that 2, 74/ 14
 
 WHY....................8
of us ere this. Why not as easily as 2, 15/ 12
with another man's goods, why should not the king 2, 32/ 23
in jeopardy with them." "Why, madam," quoth another lord 2, 36/ 25
lord, "know you anything why they should be in 2, 36/ 26
sir," quoth she. "Nor why they should be in 2, 36/ 27
him not to ask why, but heavily he took 2, 49/ 13
of things to come, why thinketh he not that 2, 50/ 14
this noble city. For why? That thing that we 2, 69/ 16
 
 WICKED.................3
the handling of such wicked devices, who declared unto 2, 43/ 10
And therefore to this wicked enterprise, which he believed 2, 43/ 32
the most piteous and wicked: I mean the lamentable 2, 82/ 17
 
 WIDOW..................3
at that time a widow -- born of noble 2, 60/ 15
the king and this widow. In whose person, albeit 2, 62/ 16
That she is a widow and hath already children 2, 64/ 10
 
 WIDOWHOOD..............1
also; whereas the only widowhood of Elizabeth Grey, though 2, 62/ 24
 
 WIFE...................17
after to be queen, wife unto King Henry the 2, 3/ 8
what if a man's wife will take sanctuary because 2, 32/ 33
sorceress -- my brother's wife! -- and others with 2, 47/ 30
of her counsel, Shore's wife, with their affinity, have 2, 48/ 8
folk least make Shore's wife of counsel, whom of 2, 48/ 16
King Edward kept Shore's wife -- on whom he 2, 48/ 20
also specially with Shore's wife, which was one also 2, 53/ 26
the house of Shore's wife (for her husband dwelled 2, 54/ 15
merriest was this Shore's wife, in whom the King 2, 56/ 12
service with Queen Margaret, wife unto King Henry VI 2, 60/ 18
simple to be his wife, so thought she herself 2, 61/ 24
in choice of a wife rather be ruled by 2, 63/ 32
that was his enemy's wife and many times had 2, 65/ 10
years, leaving his new wife in Westminster, in sanctuary 2, 65/ 23
Lucy was verily the wife of King Edward, and 2, 66/ 22
his days unto Shore's wife, a vile and abominable 2, 71/ 32
King (living his very wife, Dame Elizabeth Lucy) was 2, 73/ 16
 
 WILD...................1
good will and waxen wild, robbers and reavers walking 2, 14/ 5
 
 WILIEST................1
the merriest, another the wiliest, the third the holiest 2, 56/ 8
 
 WILL...................58
cruel, not for evil will always, but oftener for 2, 8/ 10
man," quoth Pottier, "then will my master, the Duke 2, 9/ 13
I verily trust you will if ye anything earthly 2, 13/ 22
far out of good will and waxen wild, robbers 2, 14/ 5
Lord hath wrought his will, and, thanks be to 2, 15/ 14
as well as it will, it will never be 2, 21/ 14
as it will, it will never be so well 2, 21/ 14
sanctuary. For every man will ween that no man 2, 26/ 21
ween that no man will so do for naught 2, 26/ 21
of his goodness, he will not refuse, for the 2, 26/ 32
set upon her own will, that neither his wise 2, 27/ 7
myself to mine own will but that I shall 2, 27/ 17
entreated with her good will to deliver him, then 2, 27/ 27
him out against her will. For it would be 2, 27/ 29
is no man that will be at war with 2, 28/ 23
as to her own will, she would be as 2, 28/ 31
she had as good will as she hath shrewd 2, 29/ 1
his hurt -- then will she fear that he 2, 29/ 15
fetched thence. For she will soon think that if 2, 29/ 16
for my mind, I will rather maugre her mind 2, 29/ 33
him away. And yet will I break no sanctuary 2, 30/ 2
to make them. Yet will I not say nay 2, 30/ 7
other as traitors, I will well there be some 2, 30/ 12
fear me ever they will be, while men be 2, 31/ 3
far forth as reason will. Which is not fully 2, 31/ 24
to require it. What will, then, hath yonder babe 2, 32/ 16
if a man's wife will take sanctuary because she 2, 32/ 33
sanctuary that saith he will bide there -- then 2, 33/ 3
then if a child will take sanctuary because he 2, 33/ 4
him with her good will. And thereupon all the 2, 33/ 25
in duress without color will let as little to 2, 36/ 30
which neither can have will to ask it nor 2, 37/ 16
I verily think they will, so much dread hath 2, 37/ 18
ask it, and he will. Howbeit, this is a 2, 38/ 22
he that against my will taketh out him, breaketh 2, 38/ 25
the law of nature will the mother keep her 2, 39/ 26
done; and that I will make good on thy 2, 48/ 26
Paul," quoth he, "I will not to dinner till 2, 49/ 13
of "benevolence and good will," the commissioners so much 2, 69/ 32
would of his good will have given. As though 2, 70/ 1
himself of his good will list to grant, but 2, 70/ 3
King of his good will list to take! Which 2, 70/ 4
I am sure, ye will better believe it. And 2, 73/ 2
wot it well, he will be loath to take 2, 74/ 12
I dare say he will if he take it 2, 74/ 15
experience; which albeit he will be loath, as I 2, 74/ 22
doubt not but ye will; and nevertheless I heartily 2, 74/ 26
quoth he, "if that will help." And by and 2, 75/ 8
haply to him they will answer." With that, the 2, 75/ 21
very sorry) that they will not suffer, in any 2, 79/ 30
twice asked whether he will be bishop or no 2, 80/ 30
-- by his own will. And in a stage 2, 80/ 31
they that wise be, will meddle no farther. For 2, 81/ 8
get him the good will of the people -- 2, 81/ 27
and at my commandment will do nothing for me 2, 83/ 27
much troth and good will as he had strength 2, 84/ 3
only one (called "Black Will," or "William Slaughter") except 2, 85/ 6
rode on (with evil will), and that notwithstanding, on 2, 89/ 20