WITHDRAWETH............1
the only thing that withdraweth the hearts of Englishmen 2, 5/ 2
 
 WITHDREW...............1
and little all folk withdrew from the Tower and 2, 44/ 31
 
 WITHERED...............3
he showed a wearish, withered arm and small -- 2, 48/ 11
is she old, lean, withered, and dried up, nothing 2, 55/ 30
few days after, he withered and consumed away. Then 2, 68/ 34
 
 WITHIN.................11
sorrow, what trouble hath within these few years grown 2, 13/ 1
of his goods even within the sanctuary? For neither 2, 32/ 24
green beside the chapel within the Tower, and his 2, 49/ 21
his life, and that within two hours after. Thus 2, 52/ 15
was this proclamation made within two hours after that 2, 54/ 3
to the heart that, within few days after, he 2, 68/ 33
unto their mouths, that within a while, smothered and 2, 85/ 20
mischief that he took, within less than three years 2, 87/ 7
fear, anguish, and sorrow within. For I have heard 2, 87/ 9
the duke his master, within few days after, at 2, 88/ 16
so keeping himself close within his bounds that he 2, 92/ 1
 
 WITHOUT................41
great prosperity and fortune, without a special grace, hardly 2, 4/ 21
very many, and was without violence, and, over that 2, 4/ 24
man and man together, without any respect of God 2, 6/ 6
constantly say; and that without commandment or knowledge of 2, 8/ 18
in Red Cross Street, without Cripplegate; and when he 2, 9/ 10
our enemy's hand which without his witting might abuse 2, 15/ 16
his purpose to pass without the gathering and great 2, 16/ 7
none should pass forth without their license. And over 2, 17/ 30
so great a thing without his knowledge not begun 2, 18/ 11
custody thereof nothing pertained without especial commandment of the 2, 22/ 31
him consider that sometimes without small things greater cannot 2, 26/ 15
men might, as methinketh, without sin somewhat less regard 2, 29/ 23
And I would think without any scruple of conscience 2, 32/ 20
any scruple of conscience, without any breach of privilege 2, 32/ 20
cause, he may lawfully, without any displeasure to Saint 2, 33/ 1
pondering that their youth without recreation and play cannot 2, 34/ 28
put them in duress without color will let as 2, 36/ 30
to procure their destruction without cause." The Cardinal made 2, 36/ 30
some men so greedy without any substantial cause to 2, 37/ 10
me out of sanctuary without the breach of the 2, 39/ 1
were put to death, without doubt the young king 2, 43/ 15
-- as the sea without wind swelleth of itself 2, 44/ 26
attendant about the King without the Protector's appointment -- 2, 45/ 4
given, one cried "Treason!" without the chamber. Therewith, a 2, 48/ 28
babble, sometimes taunting -- without displeasure and not without 2, 56/ 4
without displeasure and not without disport. The King would 2, 56/ 5
hour, was there (not without his assent) beheaded at 2, 57/ 17
-- caused them hastily, without judgment, process, or manner 2, 57/ 30
to be beheaded, and without other earthly guilt but 2, 58/ 1
according to his instructions, without any difficulty, brought the 2, 60/ 11
was in hand and, without any deduction thereunto, out 2, 68/ 13
hither to bring you, without your labor, pain, cost 2, 69/ 19
pace, or countenance, but without any fear of God 2, 72/ 9
for that ye, not without your great cost and 2, 72/ 27
would not gladly do without you -- that thing 2, 76/ 6
unto him so suddenly, without any warning or knowledge 2, 77/ 19
intent of their coming without his displeasure -- without 2, 77/ 32
without his displeasure -- without which pardon obtained they 2, 78/ 1
realm, he thought therefore without delay to rid them 2, 83/ 12
one on your pallet without, that, I dare well 2, 83/ 28
though the word be without fault -- forasmuch as 2, 92/ 29
 
 WITHSTAND..............1
as strong now to withstand his adversaries as ever 2, 38/ 1
 
 WITHSTOOD..............1
man's death whose life withstood his purpose. He slew 2, 8/ 13
 
 WITS...................1
unwise to mistrust your wits nor so suspicious to 2, 41/ 15
 
 WITTING................2
hand which without his witting might abuse the name 2, 15/ 16
his hand -- well witting that if he deposed 2, 25/ 14
 
 WIVED..................1
besides, if he be wived against his appetite. "And 2, 63/ 21
 
 WIVES..................3
go whistle them. Men's wives run thither with their 2, 31/ 11
the quiet of your wives and your daughters, the 2, 69/ 21
the chastity of their wives and their children, that 2, 72/ 14
 
 WOE....................4
own weal or our woe, it were hard, I 2, 15/ 9
the Lord Chamberlain. "Ah, woe worth him," quoth she 2, 22/ 4
cuius rex puer est': "Woe is that realm that 2, 74/ 18
nor forsook it in woe, but fled the realm 2, 90/ 25
 
 WOLF...................1
was betaken to the wolf to keep. At which 2, 24/ 30
 
 WOMAN..................5
any virtuous affection. This woman was born in London 2, 55/ 7
some shall think this woman too slight a thing 2, 56/ 27
proctor -- which simple woman was well-named and honest 2, 72/ 1
realm intolerable. For no woman was there anywhere, young 2, 72/ 7
of many a good woman, and great dolor to 2, 72/ 12
 
 WOMANISH...............3
the mother's dread and womanish fear shall be the 2, 28/ 18
shall be the let." "Womanish fear? Nay, womanish frowardness 2, 28/ 19
let." "Womanish fear? Nay, womanish frowardness!" quoth the Duke 2, 28/ 19
 
 WOMANLY................1
and pace demure, so womanly, and albeit she were 2, 54/ 30
 
 WOMEN..................5
the King's kindred (as women commonly, not of malice 2, 7/ 6
be at war with women. Would God some of 2, 28/ 23
of her kin were women too, and then should 2, 28/ 24
counsel, whom of all women she most hated, as 2, 48/ 16
or for that wanton women and wealthy be not 2, 56/ 24
 
 WON....................4
that could not be won might be lost ere 2, 10/ 7
I would never have won the courtesy of men's 2, 13/ 5
Duke -- who being won to his purpose, he 2, 43/ 8
that her great shame won her much praise among 2, 55/ 1
 
 WONDER.................2
turned into stones, for wonder of this shameful sermon 2, 68/ 26
But, were it for wonder or fear, or that 2, 75/ 14
 
 WONDERFUL..............1
all changed, with a wonderful sour, angry countenance, knitting 2, 47/ 16
 
 WONDERING..............1
lovely, namely while the wondering of the people cast 2, 54/ 32
 
 WONT...................1
that had not been wont elsewhere to be so 2, 61/ 26
 
 WOOD...................1
beast abide in that wood, one that had in 2, 93/ 3
 
 WOODVILLE..............2
there appointed Sir Anthony Woodville (Lord Rivers and brother 2, 14/ 11
she married the Lord Woodville, her father. Howbeit, this 2, 60/ 16
 
 WOOED..................1
receive him, but also wooed him to come, and 2, 91/ 3
 
 WOOING.................1
many a meeting, much wooing, and many great promises 2, 61/ 18
 
 WORD...................11
this wise persuaded, such word sent unto her son 2, 17/ 1
lord sendeth Your Lordship word that there is no 2, 21/ 12
fall off for a word. And in conclusion she 2, 61/ 23
that was for a word spoken in haste cruelly 2, 70/ 14
the preacher's of the word of God, namely a 2, 73/ 4
mute, and not one word answered thereunto. Wherewith the 2, 75/ 4
speak first, not one word was there answered of 2, 75/ 15
thereupon the Duke sent word unto the Lord Protector 2, 77/ 14
the crown. At which word the Prince, sore abashed 2, 85/ 1
evil part, sent him word to rise and come 2, 89/ 19
of peril, though the word be without fault -- 2, 92/ 28