COMPARABLE.............1
be in every point comparable with her. And therefore 2, 63/ 26
 
 COMPARING..............2
not begun for naught, comparing this manner present with 2, 18/ 12
chance standing by, and comparing the shortness of the 2, 54/ 10
 
 COMPASS................1
worthy to have, that compass and imagine the destruction 2, 47/ 22
 
 COMPASSED..............1
Rivers his uncle, had compassed to rule the King 2, 19/ 10
 
 COMPEL.................1
send back again and compel to return any man 2, 18/ 3
 
 COMPELLED..............3
whom any favorable necessity compelled to go thither. And 2, 30/ 25
were sure to be compelled to no larger proof 2, 66/ 14
time take it as compelled thereunto -- by his 2, 80/ 31
 
 COMPENDIOUS............1
of Perkin in any compendious process by itself. But 2, 83/ 2
 
 CON....................1
Yet if one should con so little good to 2, 81/ 2
 
 CONCEIVE...............1
so much mischief to conceive. Richard, Duke of York 2, 6/ 12
 
 CONCEIVED..............3
taken in his falsely conceived treason, and also lest 2, 53/ 32
before deprived, the Protector conceived such indignation that he 2, 89/ 13
had any such opinion conceived, he would never have 2, 90/ 8
 
 CONCERNING.............2
But the other point, concerning the bastardy that they 2, 59/ 32
the true mistrusted. Howbeit, concerning that opinion, with the 2, 82/ 31
 
 CONCLUDE...............1
Spain, to entreat and conclude a marriage between King 2, 60/ 8
 
 CONCLUDED..............2
their enemies. Upon this concluded, the Duke of Gloucester 2, 16/ 3
Protector and his council concluded that this Doctor Shaa 2, 66/ 16
 
 CONCLUSION.............11
of old foreminded this conclusion, or was now at 2, 9/ 21
long ere any good conclusion go forward. And also 2, 11/ 27
where they were in conclusion beheaded. In this wise 2, 20/ 14
therefore, as for the conclusion of my mind: Whoso 2, 33/ 10
her, for a final conclusion, that he would no 2, 40/ 12
destroy him -- in conclusion, when that no color 2, 54/ 20
matter to very good conclusion. Now happed it that 2, 60/ 11
a word. And in conclusion she showed him plainly 2, 61/ 23
lasteth always; for in conclusion King Edward returned, and 2, 66/ 1
that for a final conclusion, that the realm was 2, 79/ 16
the artificers, and, in conclusion, all kind of men 2, 81/ 24
 
 CONCORD................2
to rest in your concord. For it sufficeth not 2, 11/ 19
and the commodities of concord and unity, he made 2, 81/ 28
 
 CONCUBINE..............3
most hated, as that concubine whom the King, her 2, 48/ 17
to touch a King's concubine), left her up to 2, 55/ 19
good to be his concubine. The King, much marveling 2, 61/ 25
 
 CONCUBINES.............1
that he had three concubines which in three diverse 2, 56/ 6
 
 CONDESCENDED...........2
toward the young babe, condescended in effect that if 2, 33/ 22
longer to continue, have condescended and fully determined to 2, 74/ 8
 
 CONDITION..............3
more esteemed, yet that condition in the end of 2, 5/ 9
in the more beggarly condition, unfriended and worn out 2, 56/ 31
a king with that condition -- to forbear mine 2, 64/ 2
 
 CONDITIONS.............2
-- from whose virtuous conditions he said also that 2, 67/ 26
nothing of kin in conditions. Then said the King 2, 84/ 18
 
 CONFEDERACY............1
he was of secret confederacy in that purpose -- 2, 51/ 4
 
 CONFEDERATION..........1
-- or, rather, good confederation -- between the Duke 2, 87/ 22
 
 CONFESSED..............2
say the truth, she confessed that they were never 2, 65/ 2
he were examined, and confessed the murder in manner 2, 86/ 12
 
 CONFIRMATION...........1
for the proof and confirmation of this sentence certain 2, 67/ 6
 
 CONFIRMED..............1
granted, so many had confirmed, and which holy ground 2, 28/ 1
 
 CONFUSION..............2
betrapped and brought to confusion some of us ere 2, 15/ 12
to bring them to confusion, but it should not 2, 18/ 21
 
 CONJECTURES............1
and whoso divineth upon conjectures may as well shoot 2, 9/ 6
 
 CONJUNCTION............1
the realm by the conjunction of those two bloods 2, 91/ 10
 
 CONSANGUINITY..........1
the respect of fleshly consanguinity. Our Lord forbid that 2, 12/ 17
 
 CONSCIENCE.............6
surety of his own conscience, to go boldly to 2, 18/ 17
have it but whose conscience of his own fault 2, 32/ 15
without any scruple of conscience, without any breach of 2, 32/ 20
and had no scrupulous conscience. Among these had they 2, 58/ 21
in discharge of her conscience, that the King was 2, 64/ 28
it that his own conscience well showed him that 2, 68/ 31
 
 CONSECRATE.............1
durst it presume to consecrate. "And therefore," quoth the 2, 28/ 8
 
 CONSECRATION...........1
know. For at the consecration of a bishop, every 2, 80/ 27
 
 CONSIDER...............2
Whose wars, whoso well consider, he shall no less 2, 4/ 15
the King), let him consider that sometimes without small 2, 26/ 15
 
 CONSIDERATION..........1
any man think this consideration light (which I think 2, 26/ 13
 
 CONSIDERATIONS.........1
her. For all which considerations, none seemeth me more 2, 26/ 29
 
 CONSIDERED.............7
most dear nephew -- considered that thereby shall be 2, 27/ 3
-- the tender age considered of the elder of 2, 35/ 4
rejoiced therein, when they considered that the Protector procured 2, 55/ 5
this marriage even worldly considered was not unprofitable. For 2, 63/ 9
York. Which thing well considered, and the great knightly 2, 74/ 3
law -- because he considered that it was the 2, 81/ 21
of those both men considered, and what need in 2, 90/ 4
 
 CONSIDERING............2
all recovery, then he, considering the youth of his 2, 10/ 16
keeping but myself only, considering that there is, as 2, 35/ 9
 
 CONSPIRACY.............3
and others of his conspiracy had contrived to have 2, 53/ 1
persons, partners of his conspiracy, to gather and assemble 2, 53/ 34
soon after began the conspiracy -- or, rather, good 2, 87/ 22
 
 CONSPIRED..............2
traitorous purpose had before conspired the same day to 2, 53/ 16
him and so highly conspired against him that a 2, 89/ 5
 
 CONSTABLE..............1
unto Sir Robert Brackenbury, Constable of the Tower, with 2, 83/ 16
 
 CONSTANCY..............1
much marveling of her constancy, as he that had 2, 61/ 25
 
 CONSTANTLY.............1
the Tower, as men constantly say; and that without 2, 8/ 16
 
 CONSTRAINED............2
prince, not in a constrained fear, but in a 2, 4/ 29
some sudden necessity had constrained them. And then the 2, 52/ 30
 
 CONSTRUE...............1
pleaseth the prince to construe it. And ever I 2, 93/ 1
 
 CONSTRUED..............1
-- which he now construed all to the best 2, 46/ 2
 
 CONSUMED...............1
after, he withered and consumed away. Then on the 2, 68/ 34
 
 CONTAINING.............1
in the King's name, containing that the Lord Hastings 2, 53/ 14
 
 CONTENT................15
wept and was nothing content, but it booted not 2, 20/ 2
nor any man's reason content her, then shall we 2, 27/ 9
we all, I think, content that both be with 2, 29/ 6
Council not only be content, but also glad that 2, 35/ 20
Your Grace was well content therewith yourself." "Not very 2, 35/ 31
yourself." "Not very well content," quoth the Queen. "And 2, 35/ 32
But if she were content to deliver the Duke 2, 40/ 13
in his mind better content that it was moved 2, 47/ 32
nevertheless of their humility content to be nameless and 2, 56/ 11
for that she was content with the deed itself 2, 56/ 22
the people should be content to depose the Prince 2, 59/ 16
I pray you be content; I trust in God 2, 64/ 13
was and would be content to live; and with 2, 79/ 5
most effectual: we be content, and agree favorably to 2, 80/ 5
wisdom, not only was content to receive him, but 2, 91/ 2