HAVING.................4
to his noble children (having in themselves also as 2, 5/ 25
but for their destruction, having more regard to their 2, 16/ 20
long secret with him, having experience of the world 2, 57/ 24
coming home to Brecknock, having there in his custody 2, 90/ 18
 
 HAWSED.................1
little, but everything was hawsed above the measure: amercements 2, 70/ 5
 
 HE.....................559
the fourth, after that he had lived fifty and 2, 3/ 1
of the people; nor he himself so specially in 2, 3/ 25
At such time as he died, the displeasure of 2, 4/ 3
sake the Sixth, whom he deposed, was well assuaged 2, 4/ 4
his favor, of which he was never strange. He 2, 4/ 8
he was never strange. He was a goodly personage 2, 4/ 9
wars, whoso well consider, he shall no less commend 2, 4/ 15
commend his wisdom where he voided than his manhood 2, 4/ 16
than his manhood where he vanquished. He was of 2, 4/ 16
manhood where he vanquished. He was of visage lovely 2, 4/ 17
and nevertheless not uncomely; he was of youth greatly 2, 4/ 19
peace. The lords whom he knew at variance, himself 2, 4/ 31
in his deathbed appeased. He had left all gathering 2, 5/ 1
prince), nor anything intended he to take in hand 2, 5/ 3
in hand by which he should be driven thereto 2, 5/ 3
tribute out of France he had before obtained, and 2, 5/ 5
year foregoing his death, he had obtained Berwick. And 2, 5/ 6
time of his reign, he was with his people 2, 5/ 7
the last that ever he saw, His Highness, being 2, 5/ 13
merry with him, where he made them not so 2, 5/ 16
King Henry's blood (albeit he had a goodly prince 2, 6/ 17
charge, and finally, were he faulty, were he faultless 2, 7/ 10
were he faulty, were he faultless, attainted was he 2, 7/ 10
he faultless, attainted was he by Parliament, and judged 2, 7/ 11
death King Edward (albeit he commanded it), when he 2, 7/ 14
he commanded it), when he wist it was done 2, 7/ 14
in other men otherwise. He was malicious, wrathful, envious 2, 7/ 22
him uncut, and that he came into the world 2, 7/ 25
None evil captain was he in the war, as 2, 7/ 30
peace. Sundry victories had he, and sometimes overthrows, but 2, 8/ 2
politic order. Free was he called of dispense, and 2, 8/ 3
liberal; with large gifts he got him unsteadfast friendship 2, 8/ 5
unsteadfast friendship, for which he was fain to pill 2, 8/ 5
get him steadfast hatred. He was close and secret 2, 8/ 7
heart, outwardly companionable where he inwardly hated, not letting 2, 8/ 8
letting to kiss whom he thought to kill; dispiteous 2, 8/ 9
where his advantage grew, he spared no man's death 2, 8/ 12
life withstood his purpose. He slew with his own 2, 8/ 13
which would undoubtedly, if he had intended that thing 2, 8/ 20
his death -- which he resisted openly, howbeit somewhat 2, 8/ 24
deemed) more faintly than he that were heartily minded 2, 8/ 25
thus deem, think that he long time in King 2, 8/ 26
his brother (whose life he looked that evil diet 2, 8/ 28
to decease (as indeed he did) while his children 2, 8/ 29
that for this intent he was glad of his 2, 9/ 1
without Cripplegate; and when he was with hasty rapping 2, 9/ 10
rapping quickly let in, he showed unto Pottier that 2, 9/ 11
be king!" What cause he had so to think 2, 9/ 14
to say -- whether he, being toward him, anything 2, 9/ 14
him, anything knew that he such thing purposed, or 2, 9/ 15
any inkling thereof. For he was not likely to 2, 9/ 16
in courage of that he never intended), certain is 2, 9/ 24
certain is it that he contrived their destruction, with 2, 9/ 25
himself. And forasmuch as he well wist, and helped 2, 9/ 27
party envying other's authority, he now thought that their 2, 9/ 29
all his building, if he might first, under the 2, 10/ 3
purpose as many as he could; and those that 2, 10/ 6
of one thing was he certain: that if his 2, 10/ 8
his intent were perceived, he should soon have made 2, 10/ 8
in his good health he somewhat the less regarded 2, 10/ 11
less regarded it, because he thought, whatsoever business should 2, 10/ 12
his last sickness, when he perceived his natural strength 2, 10/ 14
so sore enfeebled that he despaired all recovery, then 2, 10/ 15
despaired all recovery, then he, considering the youth of 2, 10/ 16
his children -- albeit he nothing less mistrusted than 2, 10/ 16
the children good -- he called some of them 2, 10/ 26
other great gifts which he received, that they looked 2, 11/ 7
which among states where he once entereth creepeth forth 2, 12/ 24
with division and variance he turneth all to mischief 2, 12/ 25
shall perish, and haply he too, and ye too 2, 13/ 16
in effect everyone as he was nearest of kin 2, 14/ 14
unhappy building. For whomsoever he perceived either at variance 2, 14/ 19
bearing himself their favor, he broke unto them, some 2, 14/ 21
side, "whose blood," quoth he, "saving the King's pleasure 2, 14/ 27
about him, is," quoth he, "neither honorable to His 2, 14/ 30
King Edward himself, albeit he was a man of 2, 15/ 4
of discretion, yet was he in many things ruled 2, 15/ 5
-- whereof the end, he wist, was doubtful, and 2, 16/ 9
of a rebellion -- he secretly, therefore, by divers 2, 16/ 11
miles thence, early, ere he departed. So was there 2, 17/ 15
marvelously misliked. Howbeit, since he could not get away 2, 18/ 14
and keep himself close he would not, lest he 2, 18/ 14
he would not, lest he should seem to hide 2, 18/ 15
his own fault, whereof he saw no such cause 2, 18/ 16
cause in himself -- he determined, upon the surety 2, 18/ 17
him and say that he intended to set distance 2, 18/ 20
his power. And when he began (as he was 2, 18/ 22
when he began (as he was a very well-spoken 2, 18/ 22
his mother, saying that he, with the Lord Marquis 2, 19/ 9
him. At which dealing he wept and was nothing 2, 20/ 2
be well enough. And he thanked the Duke, and 2, 20/ 5
for his comfort, who he thought had more need 2, 20/ 7
the Duke of Gloucester, he sent the Lord Rivers 2, 20/ 10
honor and humble reverence he conveyed upward toward the 2, 20/ 17
Westminster. And for that he showed his servants that 2, 21/ 6
showed his servants that he had tidings of so 2, 21/ 6
to wake him, nor he to admit this messenger 2, 21/ 9
his bedside. Of whom he heard that these dukes 2, 21/ 9
Northampton. "Notwithstanding, sir," quoth he, "my lord sendeth Your 2, 21/ 11
is no fear. For he assureth you that all 2, 21/ 13
after the messenger departed, he caused in all the 2, 21/ 16
and every man weaponed, he took the Great Seal 2, 21/ 18
the Queen. About whom he found much heaviness, rumble 2, 21/ 19
in the best manner he could, showing her that 2, 21/ 30
could, showing her that he trusted the matter was 2, 21/ 30
it for, and that he was put in good 2, 22/ 2
him," quoth she, "for he is one of them 2, 22/ 4
my blood." "Madam," quoth he, "be ye of good 2, 22/ 5
your son." And therewith he betook her the Great 2, 22/ 11
day. By which time he might in his chamber 2, 22/ 13
his overmuch lightness that he so suddenly had yielded 2, 22/ 30
appeased. But one thing he advised them beware: that 2, 23/ 15
himself believed, of part he wist the contrary), these 2, 23/ 26
into the city, which he entered the fourth day 2, 24/ 21
great obloquy in which he was so late before 2, 24/ 25
was so late before, he was suddenly fallen in 2, 24/ 26
the Council next assembled, he was made the only 2, 24/ 27
the finishing of that he had begun that thought 2, 25/ 11
were achieved, yet durst he no further attempt as 2, 25/ 13
attempt as long as he had but half his 2, 25/ 13
well witting that if he deposed the one brother 2, 25/ 14
to the other, if he either remained in sanctuary 2, 25/ 15
lords at the Council he proposed unto them that 2, 25/ 19
prosperity whereof standeth," quoth he, "not all in keeping 2, 26/ 7
moderate pleasure -- which he cannot in this tender 2, 26/ 8
not, of his goodness, he will not refuse, for 2, 26/ 32
in whose continual company he shall be so well 2, 27/ 11
deliver him, then thought he, and such others as 2, 27/ 27
And I trust," quoth he, "with God's grace, we 2, 28/ 13
will she fear that he shall be fetched thence 2, 29/ 16
if she doubt lest he might be fetched from 2, 29/ 25
continued, I am not he that would be about 2, 30/ 4
I would not be he that should be about 2, 30/ 5
that place in which he neither is nor can 2, 31/ 26
peril -- there needeth he the tuition of some 2, 32/ 7
for him, neither none he needeth nor also none 2, 32/ 11
it by their godfathers; he must ask it himself 2, 32/ 13
babe? Which, and if he had discretion to require 2, 32/ 17
allege none other cause, he may lawfully, without any 2, 33/ 1
of sanctuary that saith he will bide there -- 2, 33/ 3
will take sanctuary because he feareth to go to 2, 33/ 4
them keep it. But he can be no sanctuary 2, 33/ 12
stand in jeopardy. And he that taketh one out 2, 33/ 17
I say plainly that he breaketh no sanctuary." When 2, 33/ 18
in effect that if he were not delivered, he 2, 33/ 22
he were not delivered, he should be fetched. Howbeit 2, 33/ 23
of the other! And he showed her that the 2, 34/ 16
delivery of him, that he might be brought unto 2, 34/ 17
-- and there should he be demeaned according to 2, 34/ 19
and over that (which he wist well she specially 2, 34/ 22
by nature, yet might he run into slander and 2, 36/ 1
and theirs also, that he bideth in this place 2, 36/ 20
where no man doubteth he shall be best kept 2, 36/ 22
the other lord that he should harp no more 2, 36/ 32
string. And then said he to the Queen that 2, 36/ 33
to the Queen that he nothing doubted but that 2, 36/ 34
son, I mind that he shall be where I 2, 37/ 9
him." "Truly, madam," quoth he, "and the farther that 2, 37/ 12
there that think that he can have no privilege 2, 37/ 15
for the tender love he beareth him, lest Your 2, 37/ 19
zeal to him that he feareth nothing but lest 2, 37/ 22
feareth nothing but lest he should escape him? Thinketh 2, 37/ 22
should escape him? Thinketh he that I would send 2, 37/ 23
reckon him sure, if he be not sure in 2, 37/ 30
his adversaries as ever he was. But my son 2, 38/ 2
no sanctuary, and therefore he cannot have it? Forsooth 2, 38/ 3
cannot have it? Forsooth, he hath found a goodly 2, 38/ 3
save an innocent! But "he is in no jeopardy 2, 38/ 5
need thereof." Would God he had not! Troweth the 2, 38/ 6
Protector (I pray God he may prove a protector 2, 38/ 8
a protector!) -- troweth he that I perceive not 2, 38/ 9
for them both that he were with his brother 2, 38/ 12
Who told him so? He shall hear him ask 2, 38/ 21
him ask it, and he will. Howbeit, this is 2, 38/ 22
a gay matter. Suppose he could not ask it 2, 38/ 23
not ask it; suppose he would not ask it 2, 38/ 23
not ask it; suppose he would ask to go 2, 38/ 24
out. If I say he shall not -- if 2, 38/ 24
myself! -- I say he that against my will 2, 38/ 25
my child from me? He is also my ward 2, 38/ 28
counsel showeth me, since he hath nothing by descent 2, 38/ 29
not serve him, nor he ask it for himself 2, 39/ 2
unto his father, when he first took him in 2, 39/ 21
them by whose death he may inherit less land 2, 39/ 32
no more, but whosoever he be that breaketh this 2, 40/ 3
need of sanctuary when he may not come to 2, 40/ 4
Protector, and such as he neither believed and was 2, 40/ 10
also loath to hear, he said unto her, for 2, 40/ 11
a final conclusion, that he would no longer dispute 2, 40/ 12
other lords there present, he durst lay his own 2, 40/ 14
answer to the contrary, he would forthwith depart therewithal 2, 40/ 16
this business afterward; for he never intended more to 2, 40/ 18
which she thought that he and all others also 2, 40/ 19
him there, but that he should incontinent be taken 2, 40/ 27
such places about that he could not be conveyed 2, 41/ 2
my very heart." And he said, in that, of 2, 42/ 17
that, of likelihood as he thought. Thereupon forthwith they 2, 42/ 18
children in his hands, he opened himself more boldly 2, 42/ 25
the Protector, deny that he ever opened his enterprise 2, 43/ 2
to the Duke until he had brought to pass 2, 43/ 3
before rehearsed. But when he had imprisoned the Queen's 2, 43/ 4
his own hands, then he opened the rest of 2, 43/ 6
fear to them whom he thought meet for the 2, 43/ 7
won to his purpose, he thought his strength more 2, 43/ 8
sakes, and that if he were ever able, he 2, 43/ 12
he were ever able, he would revenge them. Who 2, 43/ 12
offense by benefits, but he should sooner destroy himself 2, 43/ 18
brother and his kinsfolk he saw in such places 2, 43/ 19
were no doubt but he would do it indeed 2, 43/ 21
for himself, so had he spies for the Duke 2, 43/ 23
to catch him if he should be against him 2, 43/ 24
peradventure, from them whom he least suspected. For the 2, 43/ 25
not well tell whom he might trust or whom 2, 43/ 27
might trust or whom he might fear. These things 2, 43/ 28
that point that, where he had repented the way 2, 43/ 29
repented the way that he had entered, yet would 2, 43/ 30
had entered, yet would he go forth in the 2, 43/ 30
the same; and since he had once begun, he 2, 43/ 31
he had once begun, he would stoutly go through 2, 43/ 31
this wicked enterprise, which he believed could not be 2, 43/ 32
could not be avoided, he bent himself, and went 2, 43/ 33
could not be amended, he would turn it as 2, 43/ 34
it as much as he might to his own 2, 43/ 35
earldom of Hereford, which he claimed as his inheritance 2, 44/ 4
men with suspicion though he showed few men what 2, 44/ 28
showed few men what he knew. Howbeit, somewhat the 2, 44/ 29
the Lord Hastings that he much misliked these two 2, 45/ 12
For while we," quoth he, "talk of one matter 2, 45/ 13
their mouths." This meant he by Catesby, which was 2, 45/ 19
secret counsel and whom he very familiarly used, and 2, 45/ 21
man so lief, since he well wist there was 2, 45/ 23
pity was it that he had not had either 2, 45/ 29
the Lord Stanley and he had departed, with divers 2, 45/ 31
many ill signs that he saw -- which he 2, 46/ 2
he saw -- which he now construed all to 2, 46/ 2
best. So surely thought he that there could be 2, 46/ 3
purpose. For which cause he moved Catesby to prove 2, 46/ 12
out afar off, whether he could think it possible 2, 46/ 13
part. But Catesby, whether he essayed him or essayed 2, 46/ 14
reported unto them that he found him so fast 2, 46/ 15
so terrible words, that he durst no further break 2, 46/ 16
the matter. And therefore he, fearing lest their motions 2, 46/ 19
the rather for that he trusted by his death 2, 46/ 23
and excusing himself that he had been from them 2, 47/ 4
long, saying merrily that he had been asleep that 2, 47/ 5
little talking with them, he said unto the Bishop 2, 47/ 6
Gladly, my lord," quoth he. "Would God I had 2, 47/ 8
in all the haste, he sent his servant for 2, 47/ 9
between ten and eleven, he returned into the chamber 2, 47/ 15
him ail. Then, when he had sat still a 2, 47/ 20
still a while, thus he began: "What were they 2, 47/ 21
the Lord Chamberlain, as he that for the love 2, 47/ 26
love between them thought he might be boldest with 2, 47/ 27
same. "That is," quoth he, "yonder sorceress -- my 2, 47/ 29
by any other whom he loved better -- albeit 2, 47/ 33
heart somewhat grudged that he was not before made 2, 48/ 1
in this matter, as he was of the taking 2, 48/ 2
selfsame day, in which he was not aware that 2, 48/ 5
my body." And therewith he plucked up his doublet 2, 48/ 9
his left arm, where he showed a wearish, withered 2, 48/ 10
wife -- on whom he somewhat doted in the 2, 48/ 20
as it is said, he that while forbore her 2, 48/ 21
in a great anger, he clapped his fist upon 2, 48/ 27
Me, my lord?" quoth he. "Yea, thee, traitor!" quoth 2, 48/ 31
for as shortly as he shrank, yet ran the 2, 49/ 4
by St. Paul," quoth he, "I will not to 2, 49/ 12
ask why, but heavily he took a priest at 2, 49/ 14
to dinner -- which he might not go to 2, 49/ 16
So w So was he brought forth into the 2, 49/ 20
the warnings of that he should have avoided, or 2, 49/ 25
the tokens of that he could not avoid. For 2, 49/ 26
away with him, for he was disposed utterly no 2, 49/ 32
longer to bide -- he had so fearful a 2, 50/ 1
in his heart that he was thoroughly determined no 2, 50/ 7
to come, why thinketh he not that we might 2, 50/ 14
of the man that he wotteth of as I 2, 50/ 24
same morning in which he was beheaded, his horse 2, 50/ 27
The same morning, ere he were up, came a 2, 51/ 1
him thitherward, with whom he was of secret confederacy 2, 51/ 3
with a priest whom he met in the Tower 2, 51/ 6
yet" -- and therewith he laughed upon him, as 2, 51/ 9
upon him, as though he would say, "Ye shall 2, 51/ 9
wist the other what he meant, and so little 2, 51/ 10
so little mistrusted, that he was never merrier nor 2, 51/ 11
soon after, there met he with one Hastings, a 2, 51/ 15
meeting in that place, he was put in remembrance 2, 51/ 16
in such wise that he was for the while 2, 51/ 21
himself. And forasmuch as he now met this pursuivant 2, 51/ 28
him thereof with whom he had before talked thereof 2, 51/ 30
the same place while he was therein. And therefore 2, 52/ 1
was therein. And therefore he said, "Ah, Hastings, art 2, 52/ 1
Yea, my lord," quoth he, "that remember I well 2, 52/ 3
wouldst say so," quoth he, "if thou knewest as 2, 52/ 5
shall shortly." That meant he by the lords of 2, 52/ 6
at Pomfret -- which he well wist, but nothing 2, 52/ 8
In faith, man," quoth he, "I was never so 2, 52/ 9
our mortal nature! When he most feared, he was 2, 52/ 14
When he most feared, he was in good surety 2, 52/ 14
in good surety; when he reckoned himself surest, he 2, 52/ 14
he reckoned himself surest, he lost his life, and 2, 52/ 15
easy to beguile, as he that of good heart 2, 52/ 20
Of which their treason he never had knowledge before 2, 53/ 3
done it. And this he required them to report 2, 53/ 7
of the people's mind, he sent immediately after dinner 2, 53/ 11
Lord Chamberlain, as that he was an evil counselor 2, 53/ 21
heinous treason, with whom he lay nightly, and namely 2, 53/ 27
unhappy ending -- which he was now put unto 2, 53/ 29
two hours after that he was beheaded, and it 2, 54/ 4
to prison. And when he had a while laid 2, 54/ 18
upon these matters, then he laid heinously to her 2, 54/ 21
of men's manners -- he caused the bishop of 2, 54/ 26
the King's appetite when he required her. Howbeit, the 2, 55/ 13
anon her husband (as he was an honest man 2, 55/ 17
the King's days, albeit he was sore enamored upon 2, 55/ 21
enamored upon her, yet he forbore her, either for 2, 55/ 22
King would say that he had three concubines which 2, 56/ 6
special pleasure. For many he had, but her he 2, 56/ 13
he had, but her he loved; whose favor, to 2, 56/ 14
his own advancement (whereof he was, of a proud 2, 58/ 18
lost his voice that he was fain to leave 2, 59/ 3
the world, into which he durst never after come 2, 59/ 6
that they determined that he should first break the 2, 59/ 12
Paul's Cross, in which he should by the authority 2, 59/ 13
or both, so that he should seem disabled to 2, 59/ 20
to further this purpose he letted not. But nevertheless 2, 59/ 28
letted not. But nevertheless he would that point should 2, 59/ 28
children -- that would he should be openly declared 2, 59/ 33
and for the realm), he sent over in embassage 2, 60/ 5
toward and willing that he speedily, according to his 2, 60/ 10
upon the field that he had on Shrove Tuesday 2, 60/ 22
And little while enjoyed he that knighthood, for he 2, 60/ 23
he that knighthood, for he was at the same 2, 60/ 23
and very wise -- he not only pitied her 2, 61/ 7
of her constancy, as he that had not been 2, 61/ 25
continence and chastity that he set her virtue in 2, 61/ 27
marry her. And after he was thus appointed, and 2, 61/ 29
ensured her, then asked he counsel of his other 2, 61/ 32
possessions -- and that he could not well otherwise 2, 62/ 5
priesthood in cleanness as he doth in dignity, to 2, 62/ 28
in play, merrily, as he that wist himself out 2, 63/ 3
her rule. And albeit he would gladly that she 2, 63/ 3
somewhat to satisfy her, he said that albeit marriage 2, 63/ 5
to love together, as he trusted it was in 2, 63/ 8
was not unprofitable. For he reckoned the amity of 2, 63/ 10
of his own; which he thought likely to bear 2, 63/ 11
hearty favor in that he disdained not to marry 2, 63/ 12
were thought so requisite, he would find the means 2, 63/ 16
to marry himself whom he should haply never love 2, 63/ 18
pleasure of this that he had already. For small 2, 63/ 19
of all that ever he hath besides, if he 2, 63/ 20
he hath besides, if he be wived against his 2, 63/ 21
I doubt not," quoth he, "but there be, as 2, 63/ 25
rather to help that he should marry one Dame 2, 64/ 23
that she verily hoped he would have married her 2, 65/ 4
understood of this marriage, he took it so highly 2, 65/ 13
very anger and disdain he at his return assembled 2, 65/ 15
fast upon him, ere he could be able to 2, 65/ 16
able to resist, that he was fain to void 2, 65/ 17
Holland for succor. Where he remained for the space 2, 65/ 22
all the people, that he made kings and put 2, 65/ 31
attained it himself, if he had not reckoned it 2, 65/ 33
much less number than he had, at Barnet on 2, 66/ 2
the crown again that he peaceably enjoyed it until 2, 66/ 5
his color by which he pretended King Edward's children 2, 66/ 11
number to his preaching), he took for his theme 2, 66/ 27
deep root." Thereupon when he had shown the great 2, 66/ 29
of matrimony, then declared he that commonly those children 2, 66/ 31
rooted deep. And when he had laid for the 2, 67/ 5
ancient histories, then began he to descend into the 2, 67/ 7
of Parliament. Then showed he that his very right 2, 67/ 11
the Lord Protector. For he declared then that King 2, 67/ 13
from whose virtuous conditions he said also that King 2, 67/ 26
But the Lord Protector, he said, "that very noble 2, 67/ 27
father." "This is," quoth he, "the father's own figure 2, 67/ 30
been after said that he was specially chosen by 2, 68/ 6
the way tarrying lest he should prevent those words 2, 68/ 9
the Doctor, fearing that he should come ere his 2, 68/ 9
his matter thereto -- he was come to them 2, 68/ 11
Protector came. Whom when he beheld coming, he suddenly 2, 68/ 12
when he beheld coming, he suddenly left the matter 2, 68/ 12
the matter with which he was in hand and 2, 68/ 13
can never die while he liveth." While these words 2, 68/ 21
the upper story, where he stood to hearken the 2, 68/ 23
an owl. And when he once asked one that 2, 68/ 29
within few days after, he withered and consumed away 2, 68/ 34
stood up, and (as he was neither unlearned and 2, 69/ 8
of nature marvelously well-spoken) he said unto the people 2, 69/ 9
his office rather than he would assent to that 2, 70/ 18
either so negligent that he knoweth not, or so 2, 70/ 24
or so forgetful that he remembereth not, or so 2, 70/ 24
or so hard-hearted that he pitieth not, that worshipful 2, 70/ 25
peril. For whom trusted he that mistrusted his own 2, 71/ 27
own brother? Whom spared he that killed his own 2, 71/ 27
What manner of folk he most favored, we shall 2, 71/ 29
rich or poor, whom he set his eye upon 2, 72/ 7
eye upon, in whom he anything liked, either person 2, 72/ 8
grudge of the world, he would importunately pursue his 2, 72/ 10
ye the people whom he had as singular cause 2, 72/ 22
of York -- since he hath nothing worthily acquitted 2, 72/ 29
man better wotteth what he should say, and thereto 2, 73/ 5
good and virtuous that he would not say the 2, 73/ 6
say the thing which he wist he should not 2, 73/ 7
thing which he wist he should not say, in 2, 73/ 7
whose blood, saving that he set his voluptuous pleasure 2, 73/ 18
forbeareth to say that he knoweth, in avoiding displeasure 2, 73/ 26
I wot it well, he will be loath to 2, 74/ 12
take upon him, as he whose wisdom well perceiveth 2, 74/ 13
as I dare say he will if he take 2, 74/ 15
say he will if he take it. Which room 2, 74/ 15
man well perceived when he said, "Vae regno cuius 2, 74/ 17
great experience; which albeit he will be loath, as 2, 74/ 22
upon him, yet shall he to our petition in 2, 74/ 23
favor, in how much he shall perceive you the 2, 74/ 32
that the people, whom he hoped the Mayor had 2, 75/ 1
shall we amend," quoth he, "if that will help 2, 75/ 8
and by, somewhat louder, he rehearsed them the same 2, 75/ 9
the Mayor saw this, he with other partners of 2, 75/ 18
into that office that he never had spoken to 2, 75/ 26
tempered his tale that he showed everything as the 2, 75/ 29
obstinate silence"; and therewith he turned unto the people 2, 76/ 2
unto them but if he first knew some part 2, 77/ 17
their errand; as though he doubted and partly distrusted 2, 77/ 17
Then the Duke, when he had showed this unto 2, 77/ 20
that at the last he came forth of his 2, 77/ 26
to him; as though he would not yet come 2, 77/ 28
too near them till he wist what they meant 2, 77/ 29
Then the Protector, as he was very gentle of 2, 78/ 5
the good mind that he bore them all, none 2, 78/ 7
intend unto himward wherewith he ought to be grieved 2, 78/ 9
to speak, then waxed he bold to show him 2, 78/ 10
had heard the proposition, he looked very strangely thereat 2, 78/ 24
all were it that he partly knew the things 2, 78/ 25
yet such entire love he bore unto King Edward 2, 78/ 27
any one, of which he was never desirous, that 2, 78/ 29
was never desirous, that he could not find in 2, 78/ 29
crown. With which infamy he would not have his 2, 78/ 33
any crown; in which he had ever perceived much 2, 78/ 34
so use it as he that would not were 2, 79/ 1
to have it. Notwithstanding, he not only pardoned them 2, 79/ 2
the Prince, under whom he was and would be 2, 79/ 5
King to use him, he would do his uttermost 2, 79/ 7
pardon desired and obtained, he showed aloud unto the 2, 79/ 15
beseech him thereunto. If he would give them a 2, 79/ 22
inclined thereunto. But when he saw there was none 2, 79/ 27
way but that either he must take it or 2, 79/ 28
take it or else he and his both go 2, 79/ 28
both go from it, he said unto the lords 2, 79/ 28
King (for so was he from that time called 2, 80/ 18
that heard them but he perceived well enough that 2, 80/ 23
for his bulls, that he purposeth to be one 2, 80/ 28
be one, and though he pay for nothing else 2, 80/ 29
else. And yet must he be twice asked whether 2, 80/ 29
be twice asked whether he will be bishop or 2, 80/ 30
bishop or no, and he must twice say nay 2, 80/ 30
know right well that he that playeth the sultan 2, 81/ 1
of season what acquaintance he hath with him, and 2, 81/ 3
his own name while he standeth in his majesty 2, 81/ 4
Hall, and there, when he had placed himself in 2, 81/ 15
to the audience that he would take upon him 2, 81/ 19
the law -- because he considered that it was 2, 81/ 21
pleasant an oration as he could, he went about 2, 81/ 23
oration as he could, he went about to win 2, 81/ 23
the people -- when he had declared the discommodity 2, 81/ 27
of concord and unity, he made an open proclamation 2, 81/ 29
an open proclamation that he did put out of 2, 81/ 29
all enmities, and that he there did openly pardon 2, 81/ 30
to the intent that he might show a proof 2, 81/ 31
show a proof thereof, he commanded that one Fogge 2, 81/ 32
that one Fogge, whom he had long deadly hated 2, 81/ 32
by (for thither had he fled, for fear of 2, 81/ 34
sight of the people he took him by the 2, 82/ 1
his return homeward, whomsoever he met he saluted. For 2, 82/ 3
homeward, whomsoever he met he saluted. For a mind 2, 82/ 3
a servile flattery. When he had begun his reign 2, 82/ 8
mockish "election"), then was he crowned the sixth day 2, 82/ 9
ended it. But as he finished his time with 2, 82/ 15
his own), so began he with the most piteous 2, 82/ 17
the town of which he bore the name of 2, 83/ 9
his old, devised, as he rode, to fulfill that 2, 83/ 9
fulfill that thing which he before had intended. And 2, 83/ 10
would not reckon that he could have right to 2, 83/ 11
right to the realm, he thought therefore without delay 2, 83/ 12
a kindly king. Whereupon he sent one John Green 2, 83/ 14
one John Green, whom he specially trusted, unto Sir 2, 83/ 15
who plainly answered that he would never put them 2, 83/ 20
in his way. Wherewith he took such displeasure and 2, 83/ 23
that the same night he said unto a secret 2, 83/ 24
were right hard that he would refuse" -- meaning 2, 83/ 29
much better prince, if he had well served God 2, 84/ 2
and good will as he had strength and wit 2, 84/ 3
yet so fast as he had hoped, being hindered 2, 84/ 4
of very special friendship he took his time to 2, 84/ 11
that all the enemies he had except the devil 2, 84/ 12
for this communication had he sitting at the draught 2, 84/ 14
pallet chamber, on which he found in bed Sir 2, 84/ 16
mischievous matter; in which he found him nothing strange 2, 84/ 20
Wherefore, on the morrow, he sent him to Brackenbury 2, 84/ 21
a letter by which he was commanded to deliver 2, 84/ 22
night, to the end he might there "accomplish the 2, 84/ 23
in such thing as he had "given him commandment 2, 84/ 24
showed unto him that he should not reign, but 2, 84/ 28
lose my kingdom." Then he that told him the 2, 85/ 3
in the best comfort he could. But forthwith was 2, 85/ 4
To the execution whereof, he appointed Miles Forest, one 2, 85/ 11
murder beforetime. To him he joined one John Dighton 2, 85/ 14
made him knight. But he allowed not, as I 2, 86/ 3
a corner, saying that he would have them buried 2, 86/ 4
VII, both Dighton and he were examined, and confessed 2, 86/ 12
to be hanged ere he die. But Sir James 2, 87/ 3
And the mischief that he took, within less than 2, 87/ 7
of the mischief that he did; and yet all 2, 87/ 8
this abominable deed done he never had quiet in 2, 87/ 11
quiet in his mind, he never thought himself sure 2, 87/ 12
thought himself sure. Where he went abroad, his eyes 2, 87/ 13
ready to strike again. He took ill rest a 2, 87/ 16
abominable deed. Now had he outward no long time 2, 87/ 21
the most secret wise he could, one Persale, his 2, 88/ 4
close and covert manner he might be admitted to 2, 88/ 7
recommendation, showed him that he had secretly sent him 2, 88/ 11
in this new world he would take such part 2, 88/ 12
take such part as he would, and wait upon 2, 88/ 12
the Duke came home, he so lightly turned from 2, 89/ 4
Hereford's lands, to which he pretended himself just inheritor 2, 89/ 10
as the title which he claimed by inheritance was 2, 89/ 11
conceived such indignation that he rejected the Duke's request 2, 89/ 13
hatred and mistrust that he never after could endure 2, 89/ 15
London toward his coronation, he feigned himself sick, because 2, 89/ 17
feigned himself sick, because he would not ride with 2, 89/ 18
and come ride or he would make him be 2, 89/ 19
him be carried. Whereupon he rode on (with evil 2, 89/ 20
Gloucester. (From which, nevertheless, he in fair manner departed 2, 90/ 1
the Duke stood if he fell once in suspicion 2, 90/ 5
any such opinion conceived, he would never have suffered 2, 90/ 8
But men say that he was of truth not 2, 90/ 14
Duke's uncourteously rejected, but he, both with great gifts 2, 90/ 16
ways to win favor. He had been fast upon 2, 90/ 23
very special favor. Which he nothing deceived. For he 2, 91/ 4
he nothing deceived. For he -- being, as ye 2, 91/ 5
inquieted the land -- he fled the realm, went 2, 91/ 11
the matter were well-handled, he craftily sought the ways 2, 91/ 25
within his bounds that he rather seemed him to 2, 92/ 1
King . . ." And even there he left, saying that he 2, 92/ 15
he left, saying that he had already meddled too 2, 92/ 15
sore to hear what he would have said (because 2, 92/ 17
would have said (because he ended with the "King 2, 92/ 18
bold to say whatsoever he thought: whereof he faithfully 2, 92/ 20
whatsoever he thought: whereof he faithfully promised there should 2, 92/ 20
peradventure more good than he would ween, and that 2, 92/ 21
and counsel -- which he said was the only 2, 92/ 23
only cause for which he procured of the King 2, 92/ 23
in his custody, where he might reckon himself at 2, 92/ 24
home, and else had he been put in the 2, 92/ 25
of them with whom he should not have found 2, 92/ 25
fast, asked him whither he made all that haste 2, 93/ 5
all that haste; and he answered, ' In faith 2, 93/ 5
head." "No, marry," quoth he, "that wot I well 2, 93/ 9
enough. But what an he call it an horn 2, 93/ 10
the late Protector, since he is now king in 2, 93/ 18
those good abilities whereof he hath already right many 2, 93/ 21