HERALD.................1
all the haste, one herald of arms with a 2, 53/ 11
 
 HERE...................28
Rivers and my brother here, that they be innocent 2, 19/ 20
brother whom you have here with you. And here 2, 22/ 8
here with you. And here is the Great Seal 2, 22/ 9
it unto me, so here I deliver it unto 2, 22/ 10
as they went: "Lo, here be the barrels of 2, 24/ 8
grief than any man here can divine. "Wherefore, methinketh 2, 26/ 24
than our Reverend Father here present, my Lord Cardinal 2, 26/ 30
For as for her, here is no man that 2, 28/ 22
thinketh some that be here, of whose faithful mind 2, 29/ 3
appoint yourself to tarry here, then think they yet 2, 35/ 22
of them both, than here as a sanctuary man 2, 35/ 24
kept. And that is here, while I am here 2, 36/ 22
here, while I am here, which as yet intend 2, 36/ 22
would God were rather here in surety with me 2, 36/ 24
great with child, and here I bore the Prince 2, 39/ 17
brother, since etc.." "Wherefore, here intend I to keep 2, 39/ 25
great reproach. For lo, here is," quoth she, "this 2, 41/ 18
not but I could here keep safe if I 2, 41/ 20
ship? All this notwithstanding, here I deliver him, and 2, 41/ 32
may you leave him here. But only one thing 2, 42/ 4
secret, yet began there, here and there about, some 2, 44/ 22
when I met thee here once with an heavy 2, 52/ 2
thou and I met here. And lo how the 2, 52/ 10
that stood about him, "Here is a gay, goodly 2, 54/ 12
I doubt not, many here present that either in 2, 70/ 29
annoyed, yet especially ye here, the citizens of this 2, 72/ 18
according to the same, here we take upon us 2, 80/ 8
any matter at anything here spoken, for it shall 2, 93/ 12
 
 HERE'..................1
that the Duke bide here'; "it were comfortable for 2, 38/ 11
 
 HEREABOUT..............1
hand, since that near hereabout was commonly his most 2, 72/ 20
 
 HEREAFTER..............3
hap to hear more hereafter), and I never in 2, 52/ 12
to treat if we hereafter happen to write the 2, 82/ 32
himself, as ye shall hereafter hear, slain in the 2, 87/ 4
 
 HEREFORD...............1
of the earldom of Hereford, which he claimed as 2, 44/ 4
 
 HEREFORD'S.............1
Protector the Duke of Hereford's lands, to which he 2, 89/ 9
 
 HEREIN.................1
leastwise some fear. And herein is there none at 2, 33/ 8
 
 HEREUPON...............1
time in rest. For hereupon soon after began the 2, 87/ 22
 
 HERS...................2
between his kin and hers in his deathbed, and 2, 16/ 29
and all theirs and hers also, to suffer him 2, 34/ 14
 
 HERSELF................12
about the King, got herself in all the haste 2, 20/ 29
into the sanctuary, lodging herself and her company there 2, 21/ 1
wrong way. The Queen herself sat alone, alow on 2, 21/ 26
her son or for herself. For as for her 2, 28/ 22
shrewd wit), she reckoneth herself no wiser than she 2, 29/ 2
of his harm as herself, and yet would have 2, 29/ 5
Council, and profit to herself, succor to her friends 2, 34/ 21
all others also, save herself, lacked either wit or 2, 40/ 19
charge the thing that herself could not deny, that 2, 54/ 22
Howbeit, this Dame Elizabeth, herself being in service with 2, 60/ 17
that as she wist herself too simple to be 2, 61/ 23
wife, so thought she herself too good to be 2, 61/ 24
 
 HEWED..................1
the field, hacked and hewed of his enemies' hands 2, 87/ 5
 
 HID....................1
world and the truth hid from knowledge, inherited for 2, 66/ 34
 
 HIDE...................1
he should seem to hide himself for some secret 2, 18/ 15
 
 HIGH...................7
of all men, and high displeasure of God, if 2, 27/ 30
him that maketh so high a matter upon such 2, 38/ 14
a very blemish, and high disparagement -- to the 2, 62/ 26
France is by the high authority of Parliament entailed 2, 73/ 32
The man had an high heart and sore longed 2, 84/ 3
proud enterprise of an high heart, or, finally, what 2, 86/ 23
with great gifts and high behests, in most loving 2, 90/ 16
 
 HIGH-MINDED............1
the Duke was an high-minded man, and evil could 2, 90/ 10
 
 HIGHER.................2
his left shoulder much higher than his right, hard-favored 2, 7/ 20
have wished her somewhat higher. Thus say they that 2, 55/ 26
 
 HIGHLY.................10
tempestuous world that followed, highly toward him more increased 2, 4/ 2
of her blood, which highly maligned the King's kindred 2, 7/ 6
was the thing which highly sounded, not only to 2, 34/ 9
him to many things highly redounding to the diminishing 2, 53/ 22
then so suddenly so highly taken: that she was 2, 54/ 23
For many that had highly offended, she obtained pardon 2, 56/ 18
of a proud heart, highly desirous) should frame the 2, 58/ 18
pull him back, so highly she disdained it that 2, 64/ 21
he took it so highly that his embassage was 2, 65/ 14
from him and so highly conspired against him that 2, 89/ 5
 
 HIGHNESS...............4
ever he saw, His Highness, being at Windsor in 2, 5/ 13
attend upon the King's Highness out of that town 2, 18/ 7
both of the King's Highness and of all us 2, 26/ 17
commandment of the King's Highness and of his honorable 2, 53/ 30
 
 HIGHWAY................1
over this, in the highway toward Stony Stratford, where 2, 17/ 30
 
 HILL...................1
Tyrell died at Tower Hill, beheaded for treason. King 2, 87/ 3
 
 HIM....................321
that followed, highly toward him more increased. At such 2, 4/ 2
of those that bore him grudge for King Henry's 2, 4/ 4
their beginning) marvelously in him grew and increased, so 2, 5/ 12
aldermen of London to him for none other errand 2, 5/ 15
and be merry with him, where he made them 2, 5/ 16
many days before got him either more hearts or 2, 5/ 19
their entire affection toward him had been to his 2, 5/ 24
desire of sovereignty provoked him to their destruction which 2, 5/ 29
and to take upon him the rule in King 2, 6/ 23
ambition had not set him against his brother, or 2, 7/ 4
enemies, his brother against him. For -- were it 2, 7/ 5
not be delivered of him uncut, and that he 2, 7/ 25
large gifts he got him unsteadfast friendship, for which 2, 8/ 5
other places and get him steadfast hatred. He was 2, 8/ 6
must needs have hindered him so intending, whether the 2, 9/ 3
of Clarence had kept him true to his nephew 2, 9/ 4
whether he, being toward him, anything knew that he 2, 9/ 15
his friends somewhat irked him, yet in his good 2, 10/ 11
some of them before him that were at variance 2, 10/ 26
favor the King bore him, and also for that 2, 11/ 2
for that she thought him secretly familiar with the 2, 11/ 3
Her kindred also bore him sore, as well for 2, 11/ 4
the King had made him captain of Calais (which 2, 11/ 5
but if grace turn him to wisdom; which if 2, 12/ 1
evil means before pleased him best, shall after fall 2, 12/ 2
to sit up, laid him down on his right 2, 13/ 25
But the lords, recomforting him with as good words 2, 13/ 27
Adjoined were there unto him others of the same 2, 14/ 14
which every one ought him as faithful service as 2, 14/ 25
to be left about him, is," quoth he, "neither 2, 14/ 30
of his friends from him, and unto us no 2, 15/ 1
King intended to bring him up to his coronation 2, 16/ 5
should be hard for him to bring his purpose 2, 16/ 7
King and be with him at Stony Stratford, eleven 2, 17/ 14
began to quarrel with him and say that he 2, 18/ 19
answer, but shortly took him and put him in 2, 18/ 25
took him and put him in ward, and, that 2, 18/ 25
set new servants about him, such as liked better 2, 20/ 1
liked better them than him. At which dealing he 2, 20/ 1
the Lord Rivers, praying him to be of good 2, 20/ 4
that his master gave him in charge not to 2, 21/ 7
letted not to wake him, nor he to admit 2, 21/ 8
be well." "I assure him," quoth the Archbishop, "be 2, 21/ 13
his own household about him, and every man weaponed 2, 21/ 17
the Great Seal with him and came, yet before 2, 21/ 18
by the message sent him from the Lord Chamberlain 2, 22/ 3
Chamberlain. "Ah, woe worth him," quoth she, "for he 2, 22/ 4
and brought it with him after the customable manner 2, 23/ 1
citizens in violet, received him reverently at Hornsea, and 2, 24/ 19
riding from thence, accompanied him into the city, which 2, 24/ 20
Duke of Gloucester bore him in open sight so 2, 24/ 23
the seal taken from him and delivered to Doctor 2, 25/ 4
the King's brother from him, whose special pleasure and 2, 25/ 22
have his brother with him; and that by her 2, 25/ 23
loveth the King), let him consider that sometimes without 2, 26/ 15
man, if it please him to take the pain 2, 26/ 31
the King's authority fetch him out of that prison 2, 27/ 10
that prison and bring him to his noble presence 2, 27/ 10
caused her to keep him there. This is my 2, 27/ 14
means induced to deliver him. Which thing the Archbishop 2, 27/ 23
most convenient, took upon him to move her, and 2, 27/ 25
good will to deliver him, then thought he, and 2, 27/ 27
be attempted to take him out against her will 2, 27/ 29
as loath to suffer him from the King as 2, 28/ 32
and yet would have him from her if she 2, 29/ 5
in the deliverance of him to follow the counsel 2, 29/ 9
she feareth to deliver him, the more ought we 2, 29/ 13
we fear to leave him in her hands. For 2, 29/ 14
that she shall send him somewhere out of the 2, 29/ 26
maugre her mind fetch him away than leave him 2, 29/ 33
him away than leave him there till her frowardness 2, 30/ 1
or fond fear convey him away. And yet will 2, 30/ 1
defense, or misfortune draw him to that deed, a 2, 30/ 21
so sanctuary, as for him, neither none he needeth 2, 32/ 11
his own fault maketh him fain need to require 2, 32/ 15
with them that keep him there. And I would 2, 32/ 19
and only liberty reserved him to get his living 2, 32/ 31
his master must let him alone. And as simple 2, 33/ 5
of sanctuary to do him good, I say plainly 2, 33/ 18
first essay to get him with her good will 2, 33/ 25
divers other lords with him -- were it for 2, 33/ 29
were determined to keep him, some of that company 2, 34/ 1
her mind, to take him, and to leave her 2, 34/ 3
no respite to convey him; which she was likely 2, 34/ 3
hers also, to suffer him in sanctuary -- as 2, 34/ 14
Council therefore had sent him unto her to require 2, 34/ 16
her the delivery of him, that he might be 2, 34/ 17
do their best unto him, yet is there none 2, 35/ 15
better how to order him than I that so 2, 35/ 15
so long have kept him, or is more tenderly 2, 35/ 16
tenderly like to cherish him than his own mother 2, 35/ 17
own mother that bore him." "No man denieth, good 2, 35/ 17
more expedient to keep him elsewhere. Which in this 2, 35/ 28
so desirous to have him in his keeping, where 2, 35/ 35
honors there to suffer him bide where no man 2, 36/ 21
substantial cause to have him, this maketh me much 2, 37/ 11
more farther to deliver him." "Truly, madam," quoth he 2, 37/ 11
you be to deliver him, the farther be other 2, 37/ 12
suffer you to keep him, lest your causeless fear 2, 37/ 13
you further to convey him. And many be there 2, 37/ 14
broken though they fetch him out. Which, if ye 2, 37/ 17
finally refuse to deliver him, I verily think they 2, 37/ 18
tender love he beareth him, lest Your Grace should 2, 37/ 19
should hap to send him away." "Ah, sir," quoth 2, 37/ 20
so tender zeal to him that he feareth nothing 2, 37/ 22
lest he should escape him? Thinketh he that I 2, 37/ 23
that I would send him hence which neither is 2, 37/ 23
place could I reckon him sure, if he be 2, 37/ 30
both better playfellows than him that maketh so high 2, 38/ 14
safeguard, to play with him. As though princes as 2, 38/ 18
the privilege." Who told him so? He shall hear 2, 38/ 21
so? He shall hear him ask it, and he 2, 38/ 22
my will taketh out him, breaketh the sanctuary. Serveth 2, 38/ 26
privilege could not serve him, nor he ask it 2, 39/ 2
me the custody of him, I may require it 2, 39/ 3
may require it for him -- except the law 2, 39/ 3
and his lands, discharging him of the cure and 2, 39/ 5
I hence to welcome him home, and from hence 2, 39/ 19
when he first took him in his arms. And 2, 39/ 21
as great safeguard to him now reigning, as this 2, 39/ 22
intend I to keep him, since man's law serveth 2, 39/ 25
I fear to put him in the Protector's hands 2, 39/ 28
pray God shortly send him need of sanctuary when 2, 40/ 3
deliver the Duke to him and to the other 2, 40/ 13
she could not keep him there, but that he 2, 40/ 27
thence; and to convey him elsewhere, neither had she 2, 40/ 28
for than to have him fetched out of sanctuary 2, 41/ 1
should needs go from him, she deemed it best 2, 41/ 6
it best to deliver him. And over that, of 2, 41/ 7
warily to look to him, and the more circumspectly 2, 41/ 11
her own hands betook him to them of trust 2, 41/ 12
notwithstanding, here I deliver him, and his brother in 2, 41/ 32
and his brother in him, to keep, into your 2, 41/ 33
and strength to keep him if ye list, neither 2, 42/ 2
then may you leave him here. But only one 2, 42/ 4
And therewith she kissed him and blessed him, turned 2, 42/ 11
kissed him and blessed him, turned her back and 2, 42/ 11
these other lords with him had received this young 2, 42/ 13
young duke, they brought him into the Star Chamber 2, 42/ 14
where the Protector took him in his arms and 2, 42/ 16
his arms and kissed him, with these words: "Now 2, 42/ 16
Thereupon forthwith they brought him to the King his 2, 42/ 19
a privy messenger unto him straight after King Edward's 2, 43/ 1
devices, who declared unto him that the young king 2, 43/ 11
king was offended with him for his kinsfolk's sakes 2, 43/ 12
them. Who would prick him forward thereunto if they 2, 43/ 13
imprisonment was grievous unto him. And that with repenting 2, 43/ 16
and trains to catch him if he should be 2, 43/ 24
he should be against him -- and that, peradventure 2, 43/ 25
the Duke's mind, brought him to that point that 2, 43/ 29
Duke's aid to make him king, and that the 2, 44/ 2
the Protector should grant him the quiet possession of 2, 44/ 3
his own mind promised him a great quantity of 2, 44/ 7
Prince's old servants from him and set new about 2, 45/ 5
and set new about him. Thus many things coming 2, 45/ 5
was no man to him so much beholden as 2, 45/ 23
be none harm toward him in that council intended 2, 46/ 4
Lord Hastings, and kept him much in company. And 2, 46/ 9
undoubtedly the Protector loved him well, and loath was 2, 46/ 10
was to have lost him, saving for fear lest 2, 46/ 11
Catesby, whether he essayed him or essayed him not 2, 46/ 14
essayed him or essayed him not, reported unto them 2, 46/ 15
them that he found him so fast, and heard 2, 46/ 15
so fast, and heard him speak so terrible words 2, 46/ 16
Protector hastily to rid him. And much the rather 2, 46/ 21
the allective that induced him to be partner and 2, 46/ 25
praying them to spare him for a little while 2, 47/ 11
lips, and so sat him down in his place 2, 47/ 17
and what thing should him ail. Then, when he 2, 47/ 19
might be boldest with him, answered and said that 2, 47/ 27
bade speed and shrive him apace; "for by St 2, 49/ 12
head off." It booted him not to ask why 2, 49/ 13
trusty secret messenger unto him at midnight in all 2, 49/ 31
all the haste, requiring him to rise and ride 2, 49/ 31
and ride away with him, for he was disposed 2, 49/ 32
a dream, in which him thought that a boar 2, 50/ 3
Hastings would go with him, to ride so far 2, 50/ 8
his day thoughts? Tell him it is plain witchcraft 2, 50/ 13
and commend me to him, and pray him be 2, 50/ 23
to him, and pray him be merry and have 2, 50/ 23
fear; for I ensure him I am as sure 2, 50/ 23
or thrice stumbled with him almost to the falling 2, 50/ 28
came a knight unto him, as it were of 2, 51/ 1
of courtesy to accompany him to the Council, but 2, 51/ 2
the Protector to hasten him thitherward, with whom he 2, 51/ 3
and said merrily to him, "What, my lord! I 2, 51/ 7
therewith he laughed upon him, as though he would 2, 51/ 9
well past, it gave him great pleasure to talk 2, 51/ 29
pleasure to talk with him thereof with whom he 2, 51/ 30
to have suddenly destroyed him and the Duke there 2, 53/ 1
report. Every man answered him fair, as though no 2, 53/ 9
the King's father, enticing him to many things highly 2, 53/ 21
if ungracious living brought him to an unhappy ending 2, 53/ 29
them that stood about him, "Here is a gay 2, 54/ 12
And a merchant answered him that it was written 2, 54/ 13
went about to bewitch him and that she was 2, 54/ 19
Lord Chamberlain to destroy him -- in conclusion, when 2, 54/ 20
left her up to him altogether. When the King 2, 55/ 19
been long secret with him, having experience of the 2, 57/ 24
the realm were about him, out of their own 2, 58/ 6
and so it harmed him the less. Howbeit, some 2, 59/ 7
and the Prince by him. To lay bastardy in 2, 59/ 22
perceived, she virtuously denied him. But that did she 2, 61/ 16
her mind, as to him whose heart she perceived 2, 61/ 22
in conclusion she showed him plainly that as she 2, 61/ 23
advantage -- yet nevertheless him seemed that this marriage 2, 63/ 9
nation so necessary for him as the friendship of 2, 63/ 11
thought likely to bear him so much the more 2, 63/ 12
she could not pull him back, so highly she 2, 64/ 21
shown such kindness to him, to let him so 2, 65/ 6
to him, to let him so kindly get her 2, 65/ 6
came so fast upon him, ere he could be 2, 65/ 16
Duke of York, calling him "father to the Lord 2, 67/ 9
other known men than him -- from whose virtuous 2, 67/ 26
ended, the preacher got him home and never after 2, 68/ 27
for shame, but kept him out of sight, like 2, 68/ 28
the people talked of him, all were it that 2, 68/ 30
own conscience well showed him that they talked no 2, 68/ 31
when the other answered him that there was in 2, 68/ 32
man's mouth spoken of him much shame, it so 2, 68/ 33
shame, it so struck him to the heart that 2, 68/ 33
aldermen being assembled about him, all the commons of 2, 69/ 6
happed those to favor him whom the prince favored 2, 70/ 27
who could perfectly love him, if his own brother 2, 71/ 28
have already heard of him that can better tell 2, 73/ 1
request, to take upon him the guiding and governance 2, 74/ 10
loath to take upon him, as he whose wisdom 2, 74/ 13
to take it upon him, yet shall he to 2, 74/ 22
the Mayor nearer to him, with others that were 2, 75/ 5
others that were about him privy to that matter 2, 75/ 6
much marveled that heard him, and thought that they 2, 75/ 13
city; and haply to him they will answer." With 2, 75/ 21
our humble request unto him in manner fore-remembered." And 2, 76/ 33
with divers noblemen with him, besides many knights and 2, 77/ 12
of such number unto him so suddenly, without any 2, 77/ 18
matter, they sent unto him by the messenger such 2, 77/ 22
therewith so humbly besought him to vouchsafe that they 2, 77/ 23
where they might see him and speak to him 2, 77/ 28
him and speak to him; as though he would 2, 77/ 28
made humble petition unto him, on the behalf of 2, 77/ 30
be bold to move him of that matter. In 2, 78/ 2
what they meant, gave him leave to purpose what 2, 78/ 6
leave to purpose what him liked, verily trusting, for 2, 78/ 7
he bold to show him their intent and purpose 2, 78/ 10
that it would like him, of his accustomed goodness 2, 78/ 12
thereof, by taking upon him the crown and governance 2, 78/ 17
title lawfully descended unto him, and to the laud 2, 78/ 20
pain than pleasure to him that so would so 2, 79/ 1
motion that they made him, but also thanked them 2, 79/ 3
hearty favor they bore him, praying them for his 2, 79/ 4
the King to use him, he would do his 2, 79/ 7
with other noblemen about him as with the Mayor 2, 79/ 14
take the crown upon him, they would humbly beseech 2, 79/ 21
they would humbly beseech him thereunto. If he would 2, 79/ 22
as his fantasy gave him. But much they talked 2, 80/ 19
acquaintance he hath with him, and call him by 2, 81/ 3
with him, and call him by his own name 2, 81/ 4
he would take upon him the crown in that 2, 81/ 19
about to win unto him the nobles, the merchants 2, 81/ 23
no man should hate him for fear, and that 2, 81/ 26
deceitful clemency might get him the good will of 2, 81/ 27
all offenses committed against him. And to the intent 2, 81/ 31
be brought then before him. Who being brought out 2, 81/ 33
fled, for fear of him), in the sight of 2, 81/ 34
the people he took him by the hand. Which 2, 82/ 1
as his mind gave him that, his nephews living 2, 83/ 11
his cause and make him a kindly king. Whereupon 2, 83/ 14
and namely not for him, whose pride, they wist 2, 84/ 8
no peer -- kept him by secret drifts out 2, 84/ 9
his time to put him forward and by such 2, 84/ 11
by such wise do him good that all the 2, 84/ 12
could never have done him so much hurt. For 2, 84/ 13
Sir James, broke to him secretly his mind in 2, 84/ 19
in which he found him nothing strange. Wherefore, on 2, 84/ 20
the morrow, he sent him to Brackenbury with a 2, 84/ 21
as he had "given him commandment." After which letter 2, 84/ 24
had it showed unto him that he should not 2, 84/ 28
Then he that told him the tale used him 2, 85/ 3
him the tale used him with good words, and 2, 85/ 3
good words, and put him in the best comfort 2, 85/ 3
in murder beforetime. To him he joined one John 2, 85/ 14
King Richard, and showed him all the manner of 2, 86/ 1
the murder, who gave him great thanks and, as 2, 86/ 2
some say, there made him knight. But he allowed 2, 86/ 3
many other gentlemen against him. The occasion whereupon the 2, 87/ 24
of his desire, caused him in the dead of 2, 88/ 9
to be brought unto him in his secret chamber 2, 88/ 10
his master's recommendation, showed him that he had secretly 2, 88/ 11
he had secretly sent him to show him that 2, 88/ 11
sent him to show him that in this new 2, 88/ 12
would, and wait upon him with a thousand good 2, 88/ 13
Protector's mind, yet met him again, with farther message 2, 88/ 15
so lightly turned from him and so highly conspired 2, 89/ 5
so highly conspired against him that a man would 2, 89/ 5
would not ride with him. And the other, taking 2, 89/ 18
in evil part, sent him word to rise and 2, 89/ 19
or he would make him be carried. Whereupon he 2, 89/ 20
hatred and despite of him. And they say that 2, 89/ 22
would never have suffered him to escape his hands 2, 90/ 9
the Tower), waxed with him familiar. Whose wisdom abused 2, 90/ 20
was content to receive him, but also wooed him 2, 91/ 3
him, but also wooed him to come, and had 2, 91/ 3
to come, and had him from thenceforth both in 2, 91/ 3
first the marriage between him and King Edward's daughter 2, 91/ 8
King Henry VII got him home again, made him 2, 91/ 13
him home again, made him Archbishop of Canterbury and 2, 91/ 14
glad to common with him, fed him with fair 2, 91/ 21
common with him, fed him with fair words and 2, 91/ 22
King, and thereby feeling him easy to fall out 2, 91/ 25
the ways to prick him forward -- taking always 2, 91/ 26
that he rather seemed him to follow him than 2, 92/ 2
seemed him to follow him than to lead him 2, 92/ 2
him than to lead him. For when the Duke 2, 92/ 2
that God had ordered him to lose it, and 2, 92/ 8
his child had succeeded him. Howbeit, if the secret 2, 92/ 11
suddenly stopped), and exhorted him so, familiarly between the 2, 92/ 19
the King to have him in his custody, where 2, 92/ 24
Bishop right humbly thanked him, and said, "In good 2, 92/ 27
The fox, that saw him run so fast, asked 2, 93/ 4
run so fast, asked him whither he made all 2, 93/ 5
store, to have given him some of such other 2, 93/ 23