HIMSELF................65
the people; nor he himself so specially in any 2, 3/ 25
he knew at variance, himself in his deathbed appeased 2, 4/ 31
appetite of the Duke himself, intending to be king 2, 7/ 9
enterprised to be king himself. But of all this 2, 9/ 5
the regal dignity upon himself. And forasmuch as he 2, 9/ 26
should fall between them, himself should always be able 2, 10/ 13
the King, lifting up himself and underset with pillows 2, 11/ 9
with them or bearing himself their favor, he broke 2, 14/ 20
I trow, King Edward himself, albeit he was a 2, 15/ 4
the Duke of Gloucester himself and other lords, the 2, 17/ 3
neither his servants nor himself suffered to go out 2, 18/ 10
away -- and keep himself close he would not 2, 18/ 14
should seem to hide himself for some secret fear 2, 18/ 15
no such cause in himself -- he determined, upon 2, 18/ 16
goodly wise to excuse himself, they tarried not the 2, 18/ 23
adversity was strange. But himself had been all his 2, 20/ 8
of Gloucester took upon himself the order and governance 2, 20/ 15
as against the King himself, in the disturbance of 2, 22/ 26
where the King is himself. With these persuasions of 2, 23/ 24
Lord Hastings (whereof part himself believed, of part he 2, 23/ 25
of the young duke himself, the King's most honorable 2, 27/ 1
after my sovereign lord himself, my most dear nephew 2, 27/ 3
he must ask it himself that must have it 2, 32/ 14
to the young duke himself, whose both great wealth 2, 34/ 24
he ask it for himself, yet since the law 2, 39/ 2
remnant, and the Protector himself ready at hand, so 2, 40/ 26
his hands, he opened himself more boldly, both to 2, 42/ 25
he should sooner destroy himself than save the King 2, 43/ 18
provided privy guard for himself, so had he spies 2, 43/ 23
be avoided, he bent himself, and went through, and 2, 43/ 33
so special trust, reckoning himself to no man so 2, 45/ 22
them courteously and excusing himself that he had been 2, 47/ 4
which every man wist himself clear. Then the Lord 2, 47/ 25
by others devised that himself should the same day 2, 48/ 6
in great fear of himself. And forasmuch as he 2, 51/ 23
surety; when he reckoned himself surest, he lost his 2, 52/ 15
and at their coming, himself, with the Duke of 2, 52/ 27
clean and faultless of himself, sent out of heaven 2, 54/ 25
his purpose and put himself in possession of the 2, 58/ 9
either in King Edward himself or in his children 2, 59/ 20
of the realm, determining himself to marry (as it 2, 60/ 4
was requisite both for himself and for the realm 2, 60/ 5
as he that wist himself out of her rule 2, 63/ 3
contented, than to marry himself whom he should haply 2, 63/ 18
to have attained it himself, if he had not 2, 65/ 33
that neither King Edward himself nor the Duke of 2, 66/ 18
that, neither King Edward himself nor the Duke of 2, 67/ 23
all that would reckon himself lord of his own 2, 69/ 24
should pay, not what himself of his good will 2, 70/ 3
had twice rehearsed them himself. But the Recorder so 2, 75/ 29
was very gentle of himself and also longed sore 2, 78/ 5
the Prince and take himself the crown. With which 2, 78/ 33
when he had placed himself in the Court of 2, 81/ 16
there where the king himself sitteth and ministreth the 2, 81/ 20
that name and took himself as king, had it 2, 84/ 28
nor aught recked of himself, but with that young 2, 85/ 8
for treason. King Richard himself, as ye shall hereafter 2, 87/ 4
mind, he never thought himself sure. Where he went 2, 87/ 12
met with the Protector himself, with horses, and from 2, 89/ 1
to which he pretended himself just inheritor. And forasmuch 2, 89/ 10
his coronation, he feigned himself sick, because he would 2, 89/ 18
from the feast feigning himself sick; and King Richard 2, 89/ 21
coming, and so keeping himself close within his bounds 2, 92/ 1
would ween, and that himself intended to use his 2, 92/ 22
where he might reckon himself at home, and else 2, 92/ 24
 
 HIMWARD................1
anything would intend unto himward wherewith he ought to 2, 78/ 8
 
 HINDERED...............2
life must needs have hindered him so intending, whether 2, 9/ 3
he had hoped, being hindered and kept under by 2, 84/ 5
 
 HIS....................528
noble prince deceased at his palace of Westminster, and 2, 3/ 18
honor and heaviness of his people from thence conveyed 2, 3/ 19
in any part of his life as at the 2, 3/ 25
at the time of his death. Which favor and 2, 3/ 26
and affection yet after his decease, by the cruelty 2, 4/ 1
than twenty years of his reign -- a great 2, 4/ 6
mean season grown into his favor, of which he 2, 4/ 8
shall no less commend his wisdom where he voided 2, 4/ 15
where he voided than his manhood where he vanquished 2, 4/ 16
and clean-made; howbeit, in his latter days, with overliberal 2, 4/ 18
and, over that, in his latter days lessened and 2, 4/ 25
In which time of his latter days, this realm 2, 4/ 25
at variance, himself in his deathbed appeased. He had 2, 4/ 31
driven thereto -- for his tribute out of France 2, 5/ 4
and the year foregoing his death, he had obtained 2, 5/ 6
all the time of his reign, he was with 2, 5/ 7
reign, he was with his people so benign, courteous 2, 5/ 7
that no part of his virtues was more esteemed 2, 5/ 9
in the end of his days (in which many 2, 5/ 10
that ever he saw, His Highness, being at Windsor 2, 5/ 13
that time in which his life was most desired 2, 5/ 23
desired; whose love of his people and their entire 2, 5/ 23
him had been to his noble children (having in 2, 5/ 24
that could find in his heart so much mischief 2, 6/ 12
challenge the crown, putting his claim into the Parliament 2, 6/ 15
into the Parliament. Where his cause was, either for 2, 6/ 16
Duke of York and his issue male in remainder 2, 6/ 19
the realm, to prevent his time and to take 2, 6/ 23
of partners. Edward, revenging his father's death, deprived King 2, 6/ 29
fortunate -- if either his own ambition had not 2, 7/ 3
not set him against his brother, or the envy 2, 7/ 4
or the envy of his enemies, his brother against 2, 7/ 4
envy of his enemies, his brother against him. For 2, 7/ 4
was there laid to his charge, and finally, were 2, 7/ 10
ill-featured of limbs, crookbacked, his left shoulder much higher 2, 7/ 20
shoulder much higher than his right, hard-favored of visage 2, 7/ 20
envious, and, from before his birth, ever froward. It 2, 7/ 23
reported that the Duchess, his mother, had so much 2, 7/ 24
changed her course in his beginning which in the 2, 7/ 28
in the course of his life many things unnaturally 2, 7/ 29
war, as to which his disposition was more meetly 2, 8/ 1
in default (as for his own person) either of 2, 8/ 3
dispense, and somewhat above his power liberal; with large 2, 8/ 4
surety or increase of his estate. Friend and foe 2, 8/ 11
was muchwhat indifferent: where his advantage grew, he spared 2, 8/ 12
death whose life withstood his purpose. He slew with 2, 8/ 13
purpose. He slew with his own hands King Henry 2, 8/ 14
to some other than his own born brother. Some 2, 8/ 21
men also ween that his drift, covertly conveyed, lacked 2, 8/ 22
not in helping forth his brother of Clarence to 2, 8/ 23
brother of Clarence to his death -- which he 2, 8/ 23
were heartily minded to his wealth. And they that 2, 8/ 25
case that the king his brother (whose life he 2, 8/ 27
indeed he did) while his children were young. And 2, 8/ 29
he was glad of his brother's death, the Duke 2, 9/ 1
kept him true to his nephew the young king 2, 9/ 4
of the young princes his nephews (as opportunity and 2, 9/ 23
to the pursuit of his intent, and a sure 2, 10/ 2
the foundation of all his building, if he might 2, 10/ 3
and then win to his purpose as many as 2, 10/ 6
he certain: that if his intent were perceived, he 2, 10/ 8
the both parties with his own blood. King Edward 2, 10/ 9
blood. King Edward in his life, albeit that this 2, 10/ 10
that this dissension between his friends somewhat irked him 2, 10/ 10
irked him, yet in his good health he somewhat 2, 10/ 11
the parties. But in his last sickness, when he 2, 10/ 14
sickness, when he perceived his natural strength so sore 2, 10/ 14
considering the youth of his children -- albeit he 2, 10/ 16
while the youth of his children should lack discretion 2, 10/ 19
to move you than his that is by and 2, 12/ 11
-- that was ever his oath -- "I would 2, 13/ 5
whom though God did his pleasure, yet should the 2, 13/ 13
laid him down on his right side, his face 2, 13/ 25
on his right side, his face toward them; and 2, 13/ 25
thought to stand with his pleasure, there in his 2, 13/ 28
his pleasure, there in his presence (as by their 2, 13/ 28
departed, the noble Prince his son drew toward London 2, 14/ 1
at the time of his decease kept his household 2, 14/ 1
of his decease kept his household at Ludlow, in 2, 14/ 2
in the life of his father sent thither, to 2, 14/ 7
that the authority of his presence should refrain evil 2, 14/ 7
this young prince, at his sending thither, was there 2, 14/ 10
the foundation of all his unhappy building. For whomsoever 2, 14/ 19
hands and custody of his mother's kindred, sequestered in 2, 14/ 24
part of kin than his mother's side, "whose blood 2, 14/ 27
to be matched with his -- which now to 2, 14/ 28
he, "neither honorable to His Majesty nor unto us 2, 14/ 30
us, and also to His Grace no surety to 2, 14/ 31
have the mightiest of his friends from him, and 2, 15/ 1
than stood either with his honor or our profit 2, 15/ 6
already, as near of his royal blood as we 2, 15/ 13
our Lord hath wrought his will, and, thanks be 2, 15/ 14
and, thanks be to his grace, that peril is 2, 15/ 14
enemy's hand which without his witting might abuse the 2, 15/ 16
abuse the name of "his commandment" to any of 2, 15/ 17
by long succession from his ancestry, the other by 2, 15/ 30
ancestry, the other by his office and the King's 2, 15/ 31
the King's company all his mother's friends, under the 2, 16/ 2
bring him up to his coronation accompanied with such 2, 16/ 5
for him to bring his purpose to pass without 2, 16/ 7
being on their side, his part should have the 2, 16/ 10
so prudently made between his kin and hers in 2, 16/ 29
kin and hers in his deathbed, and which the 2, 16/ 29
lords, the chief of his band, wrote unto the 2, 17/ 4
was the King in his way to London gone 2, 17/ 7
side beset -- neither his servants nor himself suffered 2, 18/ 9
great a thing without his knowledge not begun for 2, 18/ 11
some secret fear of his own fault, whereof he 2, 18/ 16
upon the surety of his own conscience, to go 2, 18/ 17
should not lie in his power. And when he 2, 18/ 22
not the end of his answer, but shortly took 2, 18/ 24
found the King with his company ready to leap 2, 18/ 28
as they came in his presence, they lighted adown 2, 18/ 30
very humble wise, saluted His Grace -- which received 2, 19/ 4
by and by, in his presence they picked a 2, 19/ 6
King's other brother by his mother, saying that he 2, 19/ 8
with the Lord Marquis his brother and the Lord 2, 19/ 9
and the Lord Rivers his uncle, had compassed to 2, 19/ 10
sent a dish from his own table to the 2, 20/ 3
to bear it to his nephew the Lord Richard 2, 20/ 6
the same message for his comfort, who he thought 2, 20/ 7
himself had been all his days in ure therewith 2, 20/ 8
Chancellor of England), to his place not far from 2, 21/ 5
for that he showed his servants that he had 2, 21/ 6
so great importance that his master gave him in 2, 21/ 7
charge not to forbear his rest, they letted not 2, 21/ 8
admit this messenger into his bedside. Of whom he 2, 21/ 9
all the haste all his servants to be called 2, 21/ 16
up, and so, with his own household about him 2, 21/ 17
on the morrow crown his brother whom you have 2, 22/ 8
time he might in his chamber window see all 2, 22/ 13
in the disturbance of his coronation. But then, by 2, 22/ 26
it was indeed) to his overmuch lightness that he 2, 22/ 29
and fastly faithful to his prince, and that the 2, 23/ 5
or semblance, than to his coronation -- causing the 2, 23/ 30
and last year of his reign. But the Duke 2, 24/ 22
of the King and his realm; so that, were 2, 24/ 29
that England had in his time. Divers lords and 2, 25/ 8
he had but half his prey in his hand 2, 25/ 13
half his prey in his hand -- well witting 2, 25/ 14
be shortly conveyed to his farther liberty. Wherefore, incontinent 2, 25/ 17
comfort were to have his brother with him; and 2, 25/ 23
to the tuition of his own royal person. "The 2, 25/ 32
under nor far above his age. And nevertheless of 2, 26/ 11
estate convenient to accompany his noble majesty. Wherefore, with 2, 26/ 12
whom rather than with his own brother? And if 2, 26/ 13
us that be about His Grace, to have it 2, 26/ 18
and the honor of his Council and is also 2, 26/ 28
I doubt not, of his goodness, he will not 2, 26/ 32
own will, that neither his wise and faithful advertisement 2, 27/ 8
and bring him to his noble presence -- in 2, 27/ 10
King and the duke his brother honorable, and a 2, 27/ 21
and therein to do his uttermost devoir. Howbeit, if 2, 27/ 25
much regard took to his wealth as to her 2, 28/ 31
be as sorry of his harm as herself, and 2, 29/ 4
doubts that she fear his hurt -- then will 2, 29/ 15
a king, that let his brother be cast away 2, 29/ 31
For if either necessity, his own defense, or misfortune 2, 30/ 20
of this nobleman, to his honor and wealth, out 2, 31/ 26
far, whose love to his king, nature and kindred 2, 32/ 9
to all the world his tender youth proveth. And 2, 32/ 10
but whose conscience of his own fault maketh him 2, 32/ 15
not the king, leaving his body at liberty, satisfy 2, 32/ 23
satisfy the party of his goods even within the 2, 32/ 24
discharge a man of his debts, being able to 2, 32/ 26
they said it for his pleasure or as they 2, 32/ 28
delivered in payment of his debts, and stolen goods 2, 32/ 30
reserved him to get his living with the labor 2, 32/ 31
with the labor of his hands. "Verily," quoth the 2, 32/ 32
to go to school, his master must let him 2, 33/ 5
for the respect of his honor, or that she 2, 33/ 29
singular comfort to have his natural brother in company 2, 34/ 13
King's presence -- at his liberty, out of that 2, 34/ 18
be demeaned according to his estate. And she in 2, 34/ 20
company of the King, his brother. And in good 2, 35/ 2
the younger, which besides his infancy, that also needeth 2, 35/ 5
earthly in trust with his keeping but myself only 2, 35/ 8
to cherish him than his own mother that bore 2, 35/ 17
the King, honorably, at his liberty, to the comfort 2, 35/ 24
now King should, for his honor and good order 2, 35/ 30
to have him in his keeping, where if the 2, 35/ 35
if the child in his sickness miscarried by nature 2, 35/ 35
dread hath my lord his uncle, for the tender 2, 37/ 19
strong now to withstand his adversaries as ever he 2, 38/ 1
I perceive not whereunto his painted process draweth? ' 2, 38/ 9
that he were with his brother, because the King 2, 38/ 12
the King but if his brother -- that hath 2, 38/ 16
of sanctuary, out of his safeguard, to play with 2, 38/ 17
service, the law maketh his mother his guardian. Then 2, 38/ 30
law maketh his mother his guardian. Then may no 2, 38/ 30
a guardian only for his goods and his lands 2, 39/ 4
for his goods and his lands, discharging him of 2, 39/ 4
cure and safekeeping of his body, for which only 2, 39/ 5
born and kept in his cradle and preserved to 2, 39/ 13
and thrust out of his kingdom, I fled hither 2, 39/ 17
babe the Prince unto his father, when he first 2, 39/ 20
first took him in his arms. And I pray 2, 39/ 21
I intend to keep his brother, since etc.." "Wherefore 2, 39/ 24
Protector's hands, that hath his brother already, and were 2, 39/ 28
present, he durst lay his own body and soul 2, 40/ 14
pledge, not only for his surety but also for 2, 40/ 15
surety but also for his estate. And if she 2, 40/ 15
to be delivered into his hands in whom they 2, 40/ 22
circumspectly to see to his surety, if she with 2, 41/ 11
wise merchant adventureth all his goods in one ship 2, 41/ 31
I deliver him, and his brother in him, to 2, 41/ 33
for the trust that his father put in you 2, 42/ 5
Protector took him in his arms and kissed him 2, 42/ 16
him to the King his brother, unto the bishop's 2, 42/ 19
both the children in his hands, he opened himself 2, 42/ 25
that he ever opened his enterprise to the Duke 2, 43/ 3
both her sons into his own hands, then he 2, 43/ 5
opened the rest of his purpose with less fear 2, 43/ 6
who being won to his purpose, he thought his 2, 43/ 8
his purpose, he thought his strength more than half 2, 43/ 8
offended with him for his kinsfolk's sakes, and that 2, 43/ 12
way left to redeem his offense by benefits, but 2, 43/ 18
the King, who with his brother and his kinsfolk 2, 43/ 19
with his brother and his kinsfolk he saw in 2, 43/ 19
as he might to his own commodity. Then it 2, 43/ 35
which he claimed as his inheritance, and could never 2, 44/ 5
Duke, the Protector of his own mind promised him 2, 44/ 6
King's treasure and of his household stuff. And when 2, 44/ 7
where the Protector kept his household. The Protector had 2, 44/ 32
which was was of his near, secret counsel and 2, 45/ 20
familiarly used, and in his most weighty matters put 2, 45/ 21
or less wit. For his dissimulation only kept all 2, 45/ 29
saving for fear lest his life should have quailed 2, 46/ 11
the Lord Hastings diminish his credence, whereunto only all 2, 46/ 20
that he trusted by his death to obtain much 2, 46/ 23
Lord Hastings bore in his country -- the only 2, 46/ 24
the haste, he sent his servant for a mess 2, 47/ 10
frothing and gnawing on his lips, and so sat 2, 47/ 17
sat him down in his place, all the lords 2, 47/ 18
King, and Protector of his royal person and his 2, 47/ 23
his royal person and his realm?" At this question 2, 47/ 23
Lord Hastings was in his mind better content that 2, 47/ 32
loved better -- albeit his heart somewhat grudged that 2, 47/ 33
death, which were by his assent before devised to 2, 48/ 4
therewith he plucked up his doublet sleeve to his 2, 48/ 9
his doublet sleeve to his elbow upon his left 2, 48/ 10
to his elbow upon his left arm, where he 2, 48/ 10
but well knew that his harm was ever such 2, 48/ 18
was ever such since his birth. Nevertheless, the Lord 2, 48/ 19
her of reverence toward his King, or else of 2, 48/ 22
kind of fidelity to his friend) answered and said 2, 48/ 22
great anger, he clapped his fist upon the board 2, 48/ 27
the table, or else his head had been cleft 2, 49/ 3
ran the blood about his ears. Then were they 2, 49/ 5
done, for saving of his oath. So w So 2, 49/ 16
within the Tower, and his head laid down upon 2, 49/ 21
stricken off, and afterward his body, with the head 2, 49/ 23
self night next before his death, the Lord Stanley 2, 49/ 30
that a boar with his tusks so razed them 2, 50/ 4
gave the boar for his cognizance, this dream made 2, 50/ 6
fearful an impression in his heart that he was 2, 50/ 7
to tarry, but had his horse ready, if the 2, 50/ 8
in dreams which either his own fear fantasieth or 2, 50/ 12
rest by reason of his day thoughts? Tell him 2, 50/ 12
to raze us with his tusks, as folk that 2, 50/ 17
the messenger, and went his way. Certain is it 2, 50/ 25
which he was beheaded, his horse twice or thrice 2, 50/ 28
the way to stay his horse and common a 2, 51/ 6
the Tower street, broke his tale and said merrily 2, 51/ 7
of good hope in his life -- which self 2, 51/ 12
man's mind so near his death. Upon the very 2, 51/ 14
near the place where his head was off so 2, 51/ 15
Hastings, a pursuivant of his own name. And of 2, 51/ 16
the axe hung over his own head. "In faith 2, 52/ 9
himself surest, he lost his life, and that within 2, 52/ 15
of great authority with his prince; of living somewhat 2, 52/ 19
plain and open to his enemy and secret to 2, 52/ 20
enemy and secret to his friend; easy to beguile 2, 52/ 20
Chamberlain and others of his conspiracy had contrived to 2, 53/ 1
with divers others of his traitorous purpose had before 2, 53/ 15
to the diminishing of his honor and to the 2, 53/ 22
the universal hurt of his realm, by his evil 2, 53/ 23
of his realm, by his evil company, sinister procuring 2, 53/ 23
and inordinate abusion of his body, both with many 2, 53/ 25
was one also of his most secret counsel of 2, 53/ 26
last past, next before his death; so that it 2, 53/ 28
King's Highness and of his honorable and faithful Council 2, 53/ 30
faithful Council, both for his demerits, being so openly 2, 53/ 31
so openly taken in his falsely conceived treason, and 2, 53/ 32
lest the delaying of his execution might have encouraged 2, 53/ 32
mischievous persons, partners of his conspiracy, to gather and 2, 53/ 34
some great commotion for his deliverance; whose hope now 2, 54/ 1
hope now being by his well-deserved death politicly repressed 2, 54/ 1
all the time between his death and the proclaiming 2, 54/ 7
Howbeit, the respect of his royalty -- the hope 2, 55/ 14
and one that could his good -- not presuming 2, 55/ 18
the holiest harlot in his realm -- as one 2, 56/ 8
but it were to his bed. The other two 2, 56/ 10
would mitigate and appease his mind; where men were 2, 56/ 17
would bring them in his grace. For many that 2, 56/ 18
by the Protector and his council that the self 2, 57/ 15
was there (not without his assent) beheaded at Pomfret 2, 57/ 18
hate the Protector and his party) -- caused them 2, 57/ 30
best hastily to pursue his purpose and put himself 2, 58/ 9
which upon trust of his own advancement (whereof he 2, 58/ 17
abide them. Penker in his sermon so lost his 2, 59/ 2
his sermon so lost his voice that he was 2, 59/ 2
midst. Doctor Shaa by his sermon lost his honesty 2, 59/ 5
by his sermon lost his honesty and soon after 2, 59/ 5
honesty and soon after his life, for very shame 2, 59/ 5
after -- namely since his sermon was not incontinent 2, 59/ 10
by the authority of his preaching incline the people 2, 59/ 14
Edward himself or in his children, or both, so 2, 59/ 20
but to pretend that his own mother was an 2, 59/ 27
truth, for fear of his displeasure. But the other 2, 59/ 31
with other noblemen in his company, unto Spain, to 2, 60/ 7
he speedily, according to his instructions, without any difficulty 2, 60/ 10
Grey (which was after his queen), at that time 2, 60/ 14
of Warwick being in his embassage about the fore-remembered 2, 60/ 24
that she rather kindled his desire than quenched it 2, 61/ 17
too simple to be his wife, so thought she 2, 61/ 24
too good to be his concubine. The King, much 2, 61/ 24
thus taking counsel of his desire, determined in all 2, 61/ 28
asked he counsel of his other friends, and that 2, 61/ 33
the Duchess of York, his mother, was so sore 2, 61/ 35
alleging that it was his honor, profit, and surety 2, 62/ 2
noble progeny out of his realm -- whereupon depended 2, 62/ 3
depended great strength to his estate by the affinity 2, 62/ 4
possibility of increase of his possessions -- and that 2, 62/ 5
it well if all his voyage were in such 2, 62/ 7
such wise frustrated and his appointments deluded. And she 2, 62/ 8
not princely to marry his own subject, no great 2, 62/ 9
man that would marry his maid, only for a 2, 62/ 11
between no merchant and his own maid so great 2, 62/ 15
defouled with bigamy in his first marriage." The King 2, 62/ 29
marriage." The King, when his mother had said, made 2, 63/ 1
at a point in his own mind took she 2, 63/ 4
respect of God, where his grace inclineth the parties 2, 63/ 7
trusted it was in his, than for the regard 2, 63/ 8
as the friendship of his own; which he thought 2, 63/ 11
marry with one of his own land. And yet 2, 63/ 13
better by others of his kin, where all the 2, 63/ 17
he be wived against his appetite. "And I doubt 2, 63/ 21
rather be ruled by his eye than by mine 2, 63/ 33
mother objected openly against his marriage, as it were 2, 64/ 27
ensured. Howbeit, she said His Grace spoke so loving 2, 65/ 3
crowned queen that was his enemy's wife and many 2, 65/ 10
prayed full heartily for his loss. In which God 2, 65/ 11
it so highly that his embassage was deluded that 2, 65/ 14
and disdain he at his return assembled a great 2, 65/ 15
of two years, leaving his new wife in Westminster 2, 65/ 23
such strength, what for his lands, his alliance, and 2, 65/ 30
what for his lands, his alliance, and favor with 2, 65/ 31
down kings almost at his pleasure, and not impossible 2, 65/ 32
peaceably enjoyed it until his dying day, and in 2, 66/ 6
by the discord of his very friends, or falsehood 2, 66/ 7
friends, or falsehood of his feigned friends. I have 2, 66/ 7
ground the Protector built his color by which he 2, 66/ 11
by the Protector and his council concluded that this 2, 66/ 16
the Prince and all his children bastards that were 2, 66/ 23
assembled great number to his preaching), he took for 2, 66/ 26
preaching), he took for his theme "Spuria vitulamina non 2, 66/ 27
declared the title of his heirs unto the crown 2, 67/ 9
Then showed he that his very right heir, of 2, 67/ 11
very right heir, of his body lawfully begotten, was 2, 67/ 12
Elizabeth Lucy, and so his children bastards. And besides 2, 67/ 15
lineaments and favor of his visage" represented "the very 2, 67/ 29
of the noble duke his father." "This is," quoth 2, 67/ 30
own figure; this is his own countenance, the very 2, 67/ 31
the very print of his visage, the sure, undoubted 2, 67/ 31
those words meeting with his presence might have been 2, 68/ 2
he should come ere his sermon could come to 2, 68/ 10
to those words, hastened his matter thereto -- he 2, 68/ 10
lineaments and favor of his visage representeth the very 2, 68/ 17
noble duke of York his father. This is the 2, 68/ 18
father's own figure, this his own countenance, the very 2, 68/ 18
the very print of his visage, the sure, undoubted 2, 68/ 19
one that had been his old friend what the 2, 68/ 30
all were it that his own conscience well showed 2, 68/ 30
reckon himself lord of his own goods, among so 2, 69/ 24
no man would of his good will have given 2, 70/ 1
not what himself of his good will list to 2, 70/ 3
what the King of his good will list to 2, 70/ 3
Chief Justice, that left his office rather than he 2, 70/ 17
speak we of loss? his utter spoil, and undeserved 2, 70/ 26
preventing the time of his inheritance, attained the crown 2, 71/ 3
is, God forgive it his soul. In whose time 2, 71/ 15
trusted he that mistrusted his own brother? Whom spared 2, 71/ 27
spared he that killed his own brother? Or who 2, 71/ 28
perfectly love him, if his own brother could not 2, 71/ 28
favored, we shall, for his honor, spare to speak 2, 71/ 30
more suit was in his days unto Shore's wife 2, 71/ 31
till the King for his wanton lust and sinful 2, 72/ 1
poor, whom he set his eye upon, in whom 2, 72/ 8
God or respect of his honor, murmur or grudge 2, 72/ 10
he would importunately pursue his appetite and have her 2, 72/ 11
near hereabout was commonly his most abiding. And yet 2, 72/ 21
as any part of his realm -- not only 2, 72/ 23
this noble city (as his special chamber and the 2, 72/ 24
specially well-renowned city of his realm) much honorable fame 2, 72/ 25
and jeopardies in all his wars, bore ever your 2, 72/ 28
your special favor to his party. Which -- your 2, 72/ 28
as the King (living his very wife, Dame Elizabeth 2, 73/ 16
saving that he set his voluptuous pleasure before his 2, 73/ 18
his voluptuous pleasure before his honor, was full unmeet 2, 73/ 19
to be matched with his, and the mingling of 2, 73/ 19
reverence to the Duchess, his mother); for these causes 2, 73/ 28
manifold virtues which in his noble person singularly abound 2, 74/ 5
that it may like His Grace, at our humble 2, 74/ 10
the same, according to his very right and just 2, 74/ 12
special commodity, to whom His Majesty shall ever after 2, 74/ 31
and benevolently minded toward his election. Wherein, dear friends 2, 74/ 33
the Recorder so tempered his tale that he showed 2, 75/ 29
words and no part his own. But all this 2, 75/ 30
whereof we shall make His Grace so effectual report 2, 76/ 30
we with you, unto his noble Grace, to make 2, 76/ 33
sorrow, were fain at his back to turn their 2, 77/ 5
a great matter unto His Grace. Whereupon the Protector 2, 77/ 15
they might resort to his presence to purpose their 2, 77/ 24
he came forth of his chamber -- and yet 2, 77/ 26
of them all, that His Grace would pardon them 2, 77/ 31
them to purpose unto His Grace the intent of 2, 77/ 32
of their coming without his displeasure -- without which 2, 77/ 32
as much honor to His Grace as wealth to 2, 78/ 3
they not sure how His Grace would take it 2, 78/ 4
and finally to beseech His Grace that it would 2, 78/ 12
would like him, of his accustomed goodness and zeal 2, 78/ 12
the realm, now with his eye of pity to 2, 78/ 13
same and to set his gracious hands to the 2, 78/ 15
this realm, according to his right and title lawfully 2, 78/ 20
the land, and unto His Grace so much the 2, 78/ 21
glad to live under his obeisance as the people 2, 78/ 23
of this realm under his. When the Protector had 2, 78/ 24
unto King Edward and his children, that so much 2, 78/ 27
so much more regarded his honor in other realms 2, 78/ 28
could not find in his heart in this point 2, 78/ 29
thought that it were his own ambitious mind and 2, 78/ 32
he would not have his honor stained for any 2, 78/ 34
him, praying them for his sake to give and 2, 79/ 4
to live; and with his labor and counsel, as 2, 79/ 6
him, he would do his uttermost devoir to set 2, 79/ 7
this little while of his protectorship (the praise given 2, 79/ 8
if it would like His Grace to take the 2, 79/ 20
or else he and his both go from it 2, 79/ 28
matter, every man as his fantasy gave him. But 2, 80/ 19
by the paying for his bulls, that he purposeth 2, 80/ 28
compelled thereunto -- by his own will. And in 2, 80/ 31
and call him by his own name while he 2, 81/ 4
while he standeth in his majesty, one of his 2, 81/ 4
his majesty, one of his tormentors might hap to 2, 81/ 4
might hap to break his head -- and worthy 2, 81/ 5
for fear, and that his deceitful clemency might get 2, 81/ 26
did put out of his mind all enmities, and 2, 81/ 29
for a vanity. In his return homeward, whomsoever he 2, 82/ 3
When he had begun his reign the twenty-sixth day 2, 82/ 8
for the coronation of his nephew. Now fell there 2, 82/ 11
all the time of his reign never ceased there 2, 82/ 14
death and slaughter, till his own destruction ended it 2, 82/ 15
But as he finished his time with the best 2, 82/ 16
that is to wit, his own), so began he 2, 82/ 17
the lamentable murder of his innocent nephews, the young 2, 82/ 18
the young king and his tender brother. Whose death 2, 82/ 19
whether they were in his days destroyed or no 2, 82/ 21
true. King Richard, after his coronation, taking his way 2, 83/ 7
after his coronation, taking his way to Gloucester to 2, 83/ 8
Gloucester to visit in his new honor the town 2, 83/ 8
bore the name of his old, devised, as he 2, 83/ 9
intended. And forasmuch as his mind gave him that 2, 83/ 10
mind gave him that, his nephews living, men would 2, 83/ 11
though the killing of his kinsmen could amend his 2, 83/ 13
his kinsmen could amend his cause and make him 2, 83/ 13
This John Green did his errand unto Brackenbury (kneeling 2, 83/ 19
at Warwick, yet in his way. Wherewith he took 2, 83/ 23
a secret page of his, "Ah, whom shall a 2, 83/ 24
for me." "Sir," quoth his page, "there lieth one 2, 83/ 27
special friendship he took his time to put him 2, 84/ 11
broke to him secretly his mind in this mischievous 2, 84/ 19
should not reign, but his uncle should have the 2, 84/ 29
was the Prince and his brother both shut up 2, 85/ 4
the Prince never tied his points, nor aught recked 2, 85/ 7
with that young babe his brother lingered in thought 2, 85/ 8
joined one John Dighton, his own horse-keeper; a big 2, 85/ 15
by the occasion of his death which only knew 2, 86/ 8
their unnatural uncle and his dispiteous tormentors. Which things 2, 86/ 20
hacked and hewed of his enemies' hands, harried on 2, 87/ 5
harried on horseback dead, his hair in despite torn 2, 87/ 6
as were secret with his chamberers, that after this 2, 87/ 10
never had quiet in his mind, he never thought 2, 87/ 11
Where he went abroad, his eyes whirled about, his 2, 87/ 13
his eyes whirled about, his body privily fenced, his 2, 87/ 14
his body privily fenced, his hand ever on his 2, 87/ 14
his hand ever on his dagger, his countenance and 2, 87/ 15
ever on his dagger, his countenance and manner like 2, 87/ 15
up, leap out of his bed, and run about 2, 87/ 18
chamber -- so was his restless heart continually tossed 2, 87/ 19
and stormy remembrance of his abominable deed. Now had 2, 87/ 21
he could, one Persale, his trusty servant, who came 2, 88/ 5
presence and speech of his master. And the Duke 2, 88/ 8
of Gloucester, advertised of his desire, caused him in 2, 88/ 8
brought unto him in his secret chamber, where Persale 2, 88/ 10
chamber, where Persale, after his master's recommendation, showed him 2, 88/ 10
message from the duke his master, within few days 2, 88/ 16
horses), was come on his way to Londonward. And 2, 88/ 18
with, partner of all his devices, till that after 2, 89/ 2
devices, till that after his coronation they departed, as 2, 89/ 3
words, which so wounded his heart with hatred and 2, 89/ 14
Richard, but ever feared his own life, so far 2, 89/ 16
rode through London toward his coronation, he feigned himself 2, 89/ 17
suffered him to escape his hands. Very truth it 2, 90/ 9
upon the Protector's head, his eye could not abide 2, 90/ 12
sight thereof, but wried his head another way. But 2, 90/ 13
Gloucester. But soon after his coming home to Brecknock 2, 90/ 17
Brecknock, having there in his custody (by the commandment 2, 90/ 18
familiar. Whose wisdom abused his pride to his own 2, 90/ 21
abused his pride to his own deliverance and the 2, 90/ 21
subdued, the other, for his fast faith and wisdom 2, 91/ 2
by the tyrant for his troth to the King 2, 91/ 6
set this duke in his top: joined gentlemen together 2, 91/ 7
daughter -- by which his faith declared, and good 2, 91/ 9
good service, to both his masters at once, with 2, 91/ 9
them so godly that his death, with God's mercy 2, 91/ 17
God's mercy, well changed his life. This man, therefore 2, 91/ 17
always the occasion of his coming, and so keeping 2, 92/ 1
keeping himself close within his bounds that he rather 2, 92/ 1
realm should take by his reign, my lord Morton 2, 92/ 4
would have been that his child had succeeded him 2, 92/ 11
that day meddle with his book and his beads 2, 92/ 16
with his book and his beads and no farther 2, 92/ 16
himself intended to use his faithful, secret advice and 2, 92/ 22
to have him in his custody, where he might 2, 92/ 24
one that had in his forehead a bunch of 2, 93/ 3
purpose not to dispute his title. But for the 2, 93/ 19
of this realm whereof His Grace hath now the 2, 93/ 19