NOWHERE................1
yet that happeneth. And nowhere find we so deadly 2, 12/ 19
 
 NUMBER.................4
and, with much less number than he had, at 2, 66/ 2
as always assembled great number to his preaching), he 2, 66/ 26
the coming of such number unto him so suddenly 2, 77/ 18
north country (to the number of six hundred horses 2, 88/ 17
 
 NUNS...................1
an house of close nuns; Anne, that was after 2, 3/ 12
 
 O......................1
in so great surety." O good God, the blindness 2, 52/ 13
 
 OATH...................3
beholden, to themselves by oath and allegiance bound -- 2, 6/ 4
that was ever his oath -- "I would never 2, 13/ 5
for saving of his oath. So w So was 2, 49/ 16
 
 OBEDIENCE..............2
a willing and loving obedience; among themselves, the commons 2, 4/ 29
establish forever in due obedience unto this realm of 2, 80/ 12
 
 OBEISANCE..............1
to live under his obeisance as the people of 2, 78/ 23
 
 OBJECTED...............1
Wherefore the King's mother objected openly against his marriage 2, 64/ 27
 
 OBLOQUY................5
that from the great obloquy in which he was 2, 24/ 25
all the lords in obloquy and murmur of the 2, 25/ 29
the slanderous rumor and obloquy now going, and the 2, 27/ 4
the people, and their obloquy, but also to the 2, 34/ 11
their both dishonor and obloquy; since there is not 2, 35/ 25
 
 OBSERVED...............3
she bore, professed and observed a religious life in 2, 3/ 11
the other part faithfully observed. The Queen, being in 2, 16/ 30
old rite and custom observed as a token oftentimes 2, 50/ 31
 
 OBSTACLE...............1
of which words, such obstacle was made in the 2, 64/ 30
 
 OBSTINATE..............2
she be percase so obstinate, and so precisely set 2, 27/ 7
This is a marvelous obstinate silence"; and therewith he 2, 76/ 1
 
 OBTAIN.................3
examples be sufficient to obtain privilege for my child 2, 39/ 8
inheritance, and could never obtain it in King Edward's 2, 44/ 5
by his death to obtain much of the rule 2, 46/ 23
 
 OBTAINED...............7
France he had before obtained, and the year foregoing 2, 5/ 5
his death, he had obtained Berwick. And albeit that 2, 5/ 6
thing in good manner obtained. And if it happen 2, 28/ 15
had highly offended, she obtained pardon. Of great forfeitures 2, 56/ 18
-- without which pardon obtained they durst not be 2, 78/ 1
like pardon desired and obtained, he showed aloud unto 2, 79/ 15
God and by grace obtained as much troth and 2, 84/ 2
 
 OCCASION...............16
in hope by the occasion of the tender age 2, 9/ 22
more beware by what occasion we have taken so 2, 13/ 8
fall not in that occasion again. Now be those 2, 13/ 9
the mother but that occasion may sometimes be such 2, 35/ 27
own subject, no great occasion leading thereunto, no possessions 2, 62/ 9
lands, is often the occasion of more trouble than 2, 64/ 4
ever the well and occasion of much mischief, yet 2, 71/ 10
time and by whose occasion, what about the getting 2, 71/ 16
such as were before occasion of the contrary, and 2, 79/ 10
and known. Wherefore, this occasion offered, of very special 2, 84/ 10
place as, by the occasion of his death which 2, 86/ 8
gentlemen against him. The occasion whereupon the King and 2, 87/ 24
grew. And surely the occasion of their variance is 2, 89/ 6
would give the Duke occasion of displeasure, or the 2, 90/ 6
the Duke the Protector occasion of mistrust. And utterly 2, 90/ 7
-- taking always the occasion of his coming, and 2, 91/ 26
 
 OCCASIONS..............1
that opinion, with the occasions moving either part, we 2, 82/ 31
 
 OCCUPY.................1
to whosoever so well occupy that room as I 2, 74/ 15
 
 OF.....................963
King Edward, of that name the fourth 2, 3/ 1
Westminster the ninth day of April, the year of 2, 3/ 4
of April, the year of our redemption a thousand 2, 3/ 4
a thirteen-year-of-age; Richard, Duke of York, two years younger 2, 3/ 7
which, representing the virtue of her whose name she 2, 3/ 10
in Dartford, an house of close nuns; Anne, that 2, 3/ 12
Howard, and after Earl of Surrey. And Catherine, which 2, 3/ 13
is by the benignity of her nephew King Henry 2, 3/ 16
deceased at his palace of Westminster, and with great 2, 3/ 18
funeral honor and heaviness of his people from thence 2, 3/ 19
at Windsor. A king of such governance and behavior 2, 3/ 20
and behavior in time of peace (for in war 2, 3/ 21
was never any prince of this land attaining the 2, 3/ 23
beloved with the substance of the people; nor he 2, 3/ 24
specially in any part of his life as at 2, 3/ 25
as at the time of his death. Which favor 2, 3/ 26
cruelty, mischief, and trouble of the tempestuous world that 2, 4/ 1
he died, the displeasure of those that bore him 2, 4/ 3
in that that many of them were dead in 2, 4/ 5
more than twenty years of his reign -- a 2, 4/ 6
-- a great part of a long life -- 2, 4/ 7
life -- and many of them in the mean 2, 4/ 7
grown into his favor, of which he was never 2, 4/ 8
very princely to behold, of heart courageous, politic in 2, 4/ 10
he vanquished. He was of visage lovely, of body 2, 4/ 17
was of visage lovely, of body mighty, strong, and 2, 4/ 17
not uncomely; he was of youth greatly given to 2, 4/ 19
-- from which health of body in great prosperity 2, 4/ 21
extend to the displeasure of very many, and was 2, 4/ 24
left. In which time of his latter days, this 2, 4/ 25
prosperous estate: no fear of outward enemies, no war 2, 4/ 27
had left all gathering of money (which is the 2, 5/ 1
that withdraweth the hearts of Englishmen from the prince 2, 5/ 2
for his tribute out of France he had before 2, 5/ 5
that all the time of his reign, he was 2, 5/ 7
familiar, that no part of his virtues was more 2, 5/ 8
condition in the end of his days (in which 2, 5/ 9
port from debonair behavior of their beginning) marvelously in 2, 5/ 11
the mayor and aldermen of London to him for 2, 5/ 15
most desired; whose love of his people and their 2, 5/ 23
also as many gifts of nature, as many princely 2, 5/ 25
if division and dissension of their friends had not 2, 5/ 28
and the execrable desire of sovereignty provoked him to 2, 5/ 29
For Richard the Duke of Gloucester -- by nature 2, 6/ 3
together, without any respect of God or the world 2, 6/ 6
farther go, what manner of man this was, that 2, 6/ 11
to conceive. Richard, Duke of York, a noble man 2, 6/ 13
crown was by authority of Parliament entailed unto the 2, 6/ 19
entailed unto the Duke of York and his issue 2, 6/ 19
immediately after the death of King Henry. But the 2, 6/ 20
but intending, under pretext of dissension and debate arising 2, 6/ 22
was with many nobles of the realm at Wakefield 2, 6/ 24
they were great states of birth, so were they 2, 6/ 26
they great and stately of stomach, greedy and ambitious 2, 6/ 27
stomach, greedy and ambitious of authority, and impatient of 2, 6/ 27
of authority, and impatient of partners. Edward, revenging his 2, 6/ 28
the crown. George, Duke of Clarence, was a goodly 2, 7/ 1
brother, or the envy of his enemies, his brother 2, 7/ 4
Queen and the lords of her blood, which highly 2, 7/ 5
as women commonly, not of malice but of nature 2, 7/ 7
not of malice but of nature, hate them whom 2, 7/ 7
it a proud appetite of the Duke himself, intending 2, 7/ 8
drowned in a butt of malmsey, whose death King 2, 7/ 13
Richard, the third son, of whom we now treat 2, 7/ 16
courage equal with either of them, in body and 2, 7/ 18
under them both: little of stature, ill-featured of limbs 2, 7/ 19
little of stature, ill-featured of limbs, crookbacked, his left 2, 7/ 19
than his right, hard-favored of visage, and such as 2, 7/ 21
could not be delivered of him uncut, and that 2, 7/ 25
untoothed -- whether men of hatred report above the 2, 7/ 27
which in the course of his life many things 2, 7/ 29
his own person) either of hardiness or politic order 2, 8/ 3
Free was he called of dispense, and somewhat above 2, 8/ 4
a deep dissimuler, lowly of countenance, arrogant of heart 2, 8/ 7
lowly of countenance, arrogant of heart, outwardly companionable where 2, 8/ 8
the surety or increase of his estate. Friend and 2, 8/ 11
without commandment or knowledge of the King, which would 2, 8/ 19
helping forth his brother of Clarence to his death 2, 8/ 23
intent he was glad of his brother's death, the 2, 9/ 1
brother's death, the Duke of Clarence, whose life must 2, 9/ 2
whether the same Duke of Clarence had kept him 2, 9/ 3
be king himself. But of all this point is 2, 9/ 5
haste to the house of one Pottier, dwelling in 2, 9/ 9
my master, the Duke of Gloucester, be king!" What 2, 9/ 13
likely to speak it of naught. But now to 2, 9/ 17
return to the course of this history. Were it 2, 9/ 20
it that the Duke of Gloucester had of old 2, 9/ 21
Duke of Gloucester had of old foreminded this conclusion 2, 9/ 21
hope by the occasion of the tender age of 2, 9/ 23
of the tender age of the young princes his 2, 9/ 23
as opportunity and likelihood of speed putteth a man 2, 9/ 24
a man in courage of that he never intended 2, 9/ 24
destruction, with the usurpation of the regal dignity upon 2, 9/ 26
beginning to the pursuit of his intent, and a 2, 10/ 2
ground for the foundation of all his building, if 2, 10/ 3
first, under the pretext of revenging of old displeasure 2, 10/ 4
the pretext of revenging of old displeasure, abuse the 2, 10/ 4
the anger and ignorance of the one party to 2, 10/ 5
party to the destruction of the other, and then 2, 10/ 5
they looked therefor. For of one thing was he 2, 10/ 7
he, considering the youth of his children -- albeit 2, 10/ 16
debate while the youth of his children should lack 2, 10/ 18
children should lack discretion of themselves and good counsel 2, 10/ 19
themselves and good counsel of their friends, of which 2, 10/ 20
counsel of their friends, of which either party should 2, 10/ 23
-- he called some of them before him that 2, 10/ 26
had made him captain of Calais (which office the 2, 11/ 5
to the Queen, claimed of the King's former promise 2, 11/ 6
lords, with divers others of both the parties, were 2, 11/ 8
Ye see their youth, of which I reckon the 2, 11/ 18
love them, if each of you hate other. If 2, 11/ 20
maketh, and for hatred of each of other's person 2, 11/ 25
for hatred of each of other's person impugneth each 2, 11/ 25
plain and faithful advice, of which must needs ensue 2, 11/ 29
the evil bringing up of the Prince, whose mind 2, 11/ 30
after fall farthest out of favor; so that ever 2, 12/ 2
had so great cause of hatred as ye have 2, 12/ 8
hatred as ye have of love. That we be 2, 12/ 8
that they all preach of. But this shall I 2, 12/ 12
that the one part of you is of my 2, 12/ 13
part of you is of my blood, the other 2, 12/ 13
my blood, the other of mine allies, and each 2, 12/ 13
mine allies, and each of you with other, either 2, 12/ 13
you with other, either of kindred or affinity; which 2, 12/ 14
affinity; which spiritual kindred of affinity, if the sacraments 2, 12/ 15
affinity, if the sacraments of Christ's church bear that 2, 12/ 15
charity than the respect of fleshly consanguinity. Our Lord 2, 12/ 17
is ambition and desire of vainglory and sovereignty, which 2, 12/ 22
and above the best; of which immoderate appetite of 2, 12/ 27
of which immoderate appetite of worship, and thereby of 2, 12/ 27
of worship, and thereby of debate and dissension, what 2, 12/ 28
have won the courtesy of men's knees with the 2, 13/ 5
knees with the loss of so many heads. But 2, 13/ 6
life and you love. Of which two things, the 2, 13/ 12
all griefs forgotten, each of you love other. Which 2, 13/ 21
which at the time of his decease kept his 2, 14/ 1
to be far out of good will and waxen 2, 14/ 5
was in the life of his father sent thither 2, 14/ 7
end that the authority of his presence should refrain 2, 14/ 7
persons from the boldness of their former outrages. To 2, 14/ 8
the governance and ordering of this young prince, at 2, 14/ 9
honorable man, as valiant of hand as politic in 2, 14/ 13
there unto him others of the same party; and 2, 14/ 14
as he was nearest of kin unto the Queen 2, 14/ 15
whereby her blood might of youth be rooted in 2, 14/ 17
Prince's favor, the Duke of Gloucester turned unto their 2, 14/ 17
ground set the foundation of all his unhappy building 2, 14/ 19
the hands and custody of his mother's kindred, sequestered 2, 14/ 24
their company and attendance of which every one ought 2, 14/ 25
they -- and many of them far more honorable 2, 14/ 26
far more honorable part of kin than his mother's 2, 14/ 27
to have the mightiest of his friends from him 2, 14/ 31
namely, which is light of belief and soon persuaded 2, 15/ 3
he was a man of age and of discretion 2, 15/ 4
man of age and of discretion, yet was he 2, 15/ 5
or with the commodity of any man else, except 2, 15/ 7
only the immoderate advancement of themselves. Which whether they 2, 15/ 8
King than any respect of kindred, they might peradventure 2, 15/ 11
brought to confusion some of us ere this. Why 2, 15/ 12
others already, as near of his royal blood as 2, 15/ 13
might abuse the name of "his commandment" to any 2, 15/ 17
his commandment" to any of our undoing; which thing 2, 15/ 17
and good provision forbid! Of which good provision none 2, 15/ 18
which good provision none of us hath anything the 2, 15/ 19
parties' wills. Nor none of us, I believe, is 2, 15/ 21
a new friend made of an old foe, or 2, 15/ 22
such others, the Duke of Gloucester soon set afire 2, 15/ 26
afire them that were of themselves easy to kindle 2, 15/ 27
especial twain: Edward, Duke of Buckingham, and Richard, Lord 2, 15/ 28
and Chamberlain; both men of honor and of great 2, 15/ 29
men of honor and of great power, the one 2, 15/ 30
together with the Duke of Gloucester: that they would 2, 16/ 1
friends, under the name of their enemies. Upon this 2, 16/ 3
this concluded, the Duke of Gloucester, understanding that the 2, 16/ 4
accompanied with such power of their friends that it 2, 16/ 6
gathering and great assembly of people, and, in manner 2, 16/ 8
people, and, in manner, of open war -- whereof 2, 16/ 8
the face and name of a rebellion -- he 2, 16/ 10
the coronation and honor of the King, if the 2, 16/ 15
King, if the lords of her kindred should assemble 2, 16/ 16
on a roar. And of all the hurt that 2, 16/ 24
over that, the Duke of Gloucester himself and other 2, 17/ 3
other lords, the chief of his band, wrote unto 2, 17/ 3
Northampton, when these dukes of Gloucester and Buckingham came 2, 17/ 8
secretly with a few of their most privy friends 2, 17/ 21
spent a great part of the night. And at 2, 17/ 22
rising in the dawning of the day, they sent 2, 17/ 23
Upon which messages, many of their folk were attendant 2, 17/ 26
were attendant, when many of the Lord Rivers' servants 2, 17/ 27
their custody the keys of the inn, that none 2, 17/ 29
they had bestowed certain of their folk, that should 2, 18/ 2
that were gotten out of Northampton toward Stony Stratford 2, 18/ 3
intended, for the show of their diligence, to be 2, 18/ 6
the King's Highness out of that town: thus bore 2, 18/ 7
for some secret fear of his own fault, whereof 2, 18/ 16
determined, upon the surety of his own conscience, to 2, 18/ 17
tarried not the end of his answer, but shortly 2, 18/ 24
To whom the Duke of Buckingham said, "Go before 2, 19/ 2
destroy the noble blood of the realm. Toward the 2, 19/ 12
entered into the Tower of London and thence taken 2, 19/ 14
that they be innocent of any such matters." "Yea 2, 19/ 21
liege," quoth the Duke of Buckingham, "they have kept 2, 19/ 21
far from the knowledge of your good grace." And 2, 19/ 23
at dinner the Duke of Gloucester sent a dish 2, 20/ 3
praying him to be of good cheer, all should 2, 20/ 4
thought had more need of comfort, as one to 2, 20/ 7
all this comfortable courtesy of the Duke of Gloucester 2, 20/ 10
courtesy of the Duke of Gloucester, he sent the 2, 20/ 10
this wise the Duke of Gloucester took upon himself 2, 20/ 15
the order and governance of the young king, whom 2, 20/ 16
But anon the tidings of this matter came hastily 2, 20/ 18
she dissuaded the gathering of power about the King 2, 20/ 28
and her daughters, out of the Palace of Westminster 2, 20/ 30
out of the Palace of Westminster, in which she 2, 20/ 30
Chamberlain unto the Archbishop of York (then Chancellor of 2, 21/ 4
of York (then Chancellor of England), to his place 2, 21/ 5
that he had tidings of so great importance that 2, 21/ 7
messenger into his bedside. Of whom he heard that 2, 21/ 9
busyness; carriage and conveyance of her stuff into sanctuary 2, 21/ 21
good hope and out of fear by the message 2, 22/ 3
for he is one of them that laboreth to 2, 22/ 4
quoth he, "be ye of good cheer. For I 2, 22/ 6
the use and behoof of your son." And therewith 2, 22/ 11
yet in the dawning of the day. By which 2, 22/ 12
all the Thames full of boats of the Duke 2, 22/ 14
Thames full of boats of the Duke of Gloucester's 2, 22/ 14
boats of the Duke of Gloucester's servants, watching that 2, 22/ 14
gentlemen, either for favor of the Queen or for 2, 22/ 19
Queen or for fear of themselves, assembled in sundry 2, 22/ 20
himself, in the disturbance of his coronation. But then 2, 22/ 26
which meeting, the Archbishop of York -- fearing that 2, 22/ 28
pertained without especial commandment of the King -- secretly 2, 22/ 32
believe that the Duke of Gloucester was sure and 2, 23/ 4
them against the dukes of Gloucester and Buckingham, put 2, 23/ 7
all the other lords of the King's Council, indifferently 2, 23/ 13
matter so far out of joint that it should 2, 23/ 21
himself. With these persuasions of the Lord Hastings (whereof 2, 23/ 25
whereof part himself believed, of part he wist the 2, 23/ 26
that that the dukes of Gloucester and Buckingham were 2, 23/ 27
had contrived the destruction of the dukes of Gloucester 2, 23/ 32
destruction of the dukes of Gloucester and Buckingham, and 2, 23/ 32
Gloucester and Buckingham, and of other the noble blood 2, 24/ 1
other the noble blood of the realm, to the 2, 24/ 1
colorable proof thereof, such of the dukes' servants as 2, 24/ 3
rode with the carts of their stuff that were 2, 24/ 4
at the breaking up of that household must needs 2, 24/ 6
here be the barrels of harnesses that these traitors 2, 24/ 8
perceiving that the intenders of such a purpose would 2, 24/ 12
barrels), yet much part of the common people were 2, 24/ 14
with five hundred horse of the citizens in violet 2, 24/ 19
entered the fourth day of May, the first and 2, 24/ 22
first and last year of his reign. But the 2, 24/ 22
reign. But the Duke of Gloucester bore him in 2, 24/ 23
Prince, with all semblance of lowliness, that from the 2, 24/ 24
meet, to be Protector of the King and his 2, 24/ 29
Council also, the Archbishop of York, Chancellor of England 2, 25/ 1
Archbishop of York, Chancellor of England, which had delivered 2, 25/ 2
to Doctor Russell, Bishop of Lincoln, a wise man 2, 25/ 5
and a good, and of much experience, and one 2, 25/ 6
much experience, and one of the best-learned men, undoubtedly 2, 25/ 7
thirsted for the finishing of that he had begun 2, 25/ 11
at the next meeting of the lords at the 2, 25/ 18
was an heinous deed of the Queen, and proceeding 2, 25/ 20
the Queen, and proceeding of great malice toward the 2, 25/ 20
in obloquy and murmur of the people -- as 2, 25/ 29
that by the assent of the nobles of the 2, 25/ 30
assent of the nobles of the land were appointed 2, 25/ 31
friends, to the tuition of his own royal person 2, 25/ 32
take in the company of ancient persons, but in 2, 26/ 9
in the familiar conversation of those that be neither 2, 26/ 10
his age. And nevertheless of estate convenient to accompany 2, 26/ 11
to the dishonor both of the King's Highness and 2, 26/ 17
the King's Highness and of all us that be 2, 26/ 17
Queen, for the redress of this matter, some honorable 2, 26/ 26
weal and the honor of his Council and is 2, 26/ 28
matter do most good of any man, if it 2, 26/ 31
Which I doubt not, of his goodness, he will 2, 26/ 32
and ours, and wealth of the young duke himself 2, 27/ 1
authority fetch him out of that prison and bring 2, 27/ 10
this time, except any of your lordships anything perceive 2, 27/ 15
Which thing the Archbishop of York, whom they all 2, 27/ 23
such others as were of the spiritualty present, that 2, 27/ 27
to the great grudge of all men, and high 2, 27/ 30
men, and high displeasure of God, if the privilege 2, 27/ 31
God, if the privilege of that holy place should 2, 27/ 31
accompanied with great multitude of angels by night -- 2, 28/ 4
therefore," quoth the Archbishop of York, "God forbid that 2, 28/ 9
the immunity and liberty of that sacred sanctuary, that 2, 28/ 11
hath been the safeguard of so many a good 2, 28/ 12
perceive that no lack of my devoir, but the 2, 28/ 18
frowardness!" quoth the Duke of Buckingham. "For I dare 2, 28/ 20
women. Would God some of the men of her 2, 28/ 23
some of the men of her kin were women 2, 28/ 24
Howbeit, there is none of her kin the less 2, 28/ 25
grace we besides be of kin. Whose honor if 2, 28/ 29
the King as any of us be. For if 2, 28/ 32
some that be here, of whose faithful mind she 2, 29/ 3
would be as sorry of his harm as herself 2, 29/ 4
refuse in the deliverance of him to follow the 2, 29/ 9
to follow the counsel of them whose wisdom she 2, 29/ 10
send him somewhere out of the realm? Verily, I 2, 29/ 26
were a wise sort of councillors about a king 2, 29/ 31
verily, since the privileges of that place and others 2, 30/ 3
others like have been of long continued, I am 2, 30/ 3
it is a deed of pity that such men 2, 30/ 8
should have some place of liberty, to keep their 2, 30/ 9
keep their bodies out of the danger of their 2, 30/ 10
out of the danger of their cruel creditors. And 2, 30/ 10
there be some places of refuge for both. But 2, 30/ 13
But as for thieves, of which these places be 2, 30/ 15
either the law granteth of course or the king 2, 30/ 22
course or the king of pity may. "Then look 2, 30/ 22
there be commonly therein, of them whom willful unthriftiness 2, 30/ 26
naught. "What a rabble of thieves, murderers, and malicious 2, 30/ 28
one at the elbow of the city, the other 2, 30/ 30
the hurt that cometh of them, and ye shall 2, 30/ 31
Peter were the patrons of ungracious living! Now unthrifts 2, 31/ 5
debt, upon the boldness of these places; yea, and 2, 31/ 8
do more. Howbeit, much of this mischief, if wise 2, 31/ 17
amended, with great thank of God and no breach 2, 31/ 19
God and no breach of the privilege. The residue 2, 31/ 19
and other men since, of a certain religious fear 2, 31/ 22
serve to let us of the fetching forth of 2, 31/ 25
of the fetching forth of this nobleman, to his 2, 31/ 25
honor and wealth, out of that place in which 2, 31/ 26
to defend the body of that man that standeth 2, 31/ 28
in danger abroad, not of great hurt only, but 2, 31/ 29
hurt only, but also of lawful hurt. For against 2, 31/ 30
needeth he the tuition of some special privilege; which 2, 32/ 7
only ground and cause of all sanctuaries. From which 2, 32/ 8
it but whose conscience of his own fault maketh 2, 32/ 15
think without any scruple of conscience, without any breach 2, 32/ 20
conscience, without any breach of privilege, to be somewhat 2, 32/ 20
liberty, satisfy the party of his goods even within 2, 32/ 24
shall discharge a man of his debts, being able 2, 32/ 26
And with that, divers of the clergy that were 2, 32/ 27
that by the law of God and of the 2, 32/ 29
law of God and of the Church, the goods 2, 32/ 29
the Church, the goods of a sanctuary man should 2, 32/ 29
be delivered in payment of his debts, and stolen 2, 32/ 30
living with the labor of his hands. "Verily," quoth 2, 32/ 32
Peter, take her out of Saint Peter's church by 2, 33/ 2
may be taken out of sanctuary that saith he 2, 33/ 3
I have often heard of sanctuary men, but I 2, 33/ 9
I never heard erst of sanctuary children. And therefore 2, 33/ 9
as for the conclusion of my mind: Whoso may 2, 33/ 10
that taketh one out of sanctuary to do him 2, 33/ 18
whole, and good part of the spiritual also, thinking 2, 33/ 21
best, in the voiding of all manner of rumor 2, 33/ 24
voiding of all manner of rumor, that the Lord 2, 33/ 24
it for the respect of his honor, or that 2, 33/ 29
she should by presence of so many perceive that 2, 33/ 30
to keep him, some of that company had haply 2, 34/ 1
Council that her keeping of the King's brother in 2, 34/ 9
to the great rumor of the people, and their 2, 34/ 10
importable grief and displeasure of the King's royal majesty 2, 34/ 11
in danger and peril of the other! And he 2, 34/ 15
require her the delivery of him, that he might 2, 34/ 17
at his liberty, out of that place which they 2, 34/ 18
stranger for the convenience of their both ages and 2, 34/ 29
that point for any of them as either of 2, 34/ 30
of them as either of them for other. "My 2, 34/ 30
were in the company of the King, his brother 2, 35/ 1
be in the custody of their mother -- the 2, 35/ 4
the tender age considered of the elder of them 2, 35/ 4
considered of the elder of them both, but especially 2, 35/ 5
that Your Grace were of all folk most necessary 2, 35/ 18
convenient that the Duke of York were with the 2, 35/ 23
liberty, to the comfort of them both, than here 2, 35/ 24
honor and good order of the country, keep household 2, 35/ 30
in Wales, far out of your company -- Your 2, 35/ 31
into slander and suspicion of fraud. And where they 2, 36/ 2
jeopard myself after others of my friends -- which 2, 36/ 24
but that those lords of her honorable kin which 2, 36/ 34
I am so near of kin to the King 2, 37/ 5
sickness -- come out of sanctuary, out of his 2, 38/ 17
out of sanctuary, out of his safeguard, to play 2, 38/ 17
ward from me out of sanctuary without the breach 2, 38/ 31
sanctuary without the breach of the sanctuary. And if 2, 39/ 1
to me the custody of him, I may require 2, 39/ 3
his lands, discharging him of the cure and safekeeping 2, 39/ 5
the cure and safekeeping of his body, for which 2, 39/ 5
child may take benefit of it), mine other son 2, 39/ 12
banished and thrust out of his kingdom, I fled 2, 39/ 16
the infant, the law of nature will the mother 2, 39/ 26
the crown. The cause of my fear hath no 2, 39/ 30
every man the custody of them by whose death 2, 39/ 32
shortly send him need of sanctuary when he may 2, 40/ 4
it. For taken out of sanctuary would I not 2, 40/ 6
to depart than some of the remnant, and the 2, 40/ 26
have him fetched out of sanctuary, which she thought 2, 41/ 1
him. And over that, of the Cardinal's faith she 2, 41/ 7
she nothing doubted, nor of some other lords', neither 2, 41/ 7
betook him to them of trust. And at the 2, 41/ 12
to mistrust your troths. Of which thing I purpose 2, 41/ 15
proof as, if either of both lacked in you 2, 41/ 16
they wist where any of it lay in their 2, 41/ 23
experience that the desire of a kingdom knoweth no 2, 41/ 24
the nephews be sure of their uncle? Each of 2, 41/ 27
of their uncle? Each of these children is other's 2, 41/ 28
be asunder, and each of their lives lieth in 2, 41/ 29
keep, into your hands, of whom I shall ask 2, 41/ 33
list, neither lack ye of yourselves nor can lack 2, 42/ 3
he said, in that, of likelihood as he thought 2, 42/ 18
into the Tower, out of which after that day 2, 42/ 22
chiefly to the Duke of Buckingham -- although I 2, 42/ 27
the beginning, and some of the Protector's friends said 2, 42/ 31
was the first mover of the Protector to this 2, 42/ 32
better the subtle wit of the Protector, deny that 2, 43/ 2
he opened the rest of his purpose with less 2, 43/ 6
craftsmasters in the handling of such wicked devices, who 2, 43/ 10
suspected. For the state of things and the dispositions 2, 43/ 26
things and the dispositions of men were then such 2, 43/ 26
him the quiet possession of the earldom of Hereford 2, 44/ 4
possession of the earldom of Hereford, which he claimed 2, 44/ 4
time. Besides these requests of the Duke, the Protector 2, 44/ 6
the Duke, the Protector of his own mind promised 2, 44/ 6
him a great quantity of the King's treasure and 2, 44/ 7
the King's treasure and of his household stuff. And 2, 44/ 7
prepare for the coronation of the young king -- 2, 44/ 9
the eyes and minds of men from perceiving of 2, 44/ 11
of men from perceiving of their drifts otherwhere, the 2, 44/ 11
for from all parts of the realm, came thick 2, 44/ 14
Lord Cardinal, the Archbishop of York (then Lord Chancellor 2, 44/ 16
Lord Chancellor), the Bishop of Ely, the Lord Stanley 2, 44/ 17
there about, some manner of muttering among the people 2, 44/ 23
great things, men's hearts of a secret instinct of 2, 44/ 25
of a secret instinct of nature misgiveth them -- 2, 44/ 26
sea without wind swelleth of itself sometimes before a 2, 44/ 26
which removed also divers of the Prince's old servants 2, 45/ 5
partly by chance, partly of purpose, caused, at length 2, 45/ 6
that was after Earl of Derby, wisely mistrusted it 2, 45/ 11
we," quoth he, "talk of one matter in the 2, 45/ 14
it were well out of their mouths." This meant 2, 45/ 18
Catesby, which was was of his near, secret counsel 2, 45/ 20
well-learned in the laws of this land, and, by 2, 45/ 25
by the special favor of the Lord Chamberlain, in 2, 45/ 26
in all the county of Leicester, where the Lord 2, 45/ 27
where Catesby was. And of truth, the Protector and 2, 46/ 7
Protector and the Duke of Buckingham made very good 2, 46/ 8
no further break. And of truth, the Lord Chamberlain 2, 46/ 17
truth, the Lord Chamberlain of very trust showed unto 2, 46/ 17
death to obtain much of the rule that the 2, 46/ 23
and one special contriver of all this horrible treason 2, 46/ 25
Friday the thirteenth day of June -- many lords 2, 46/ 28
devising the honorable solemnity of the King's coronation, of 2, 46/ 30
of the King's coronation, of which the time appointed 2, 46/ 30
so sitting together communing of this matter, the Protector 2, 47/ 2
-- first about nine of the clock, saluting them 2, 47/ 3
said unto the Bishop of Ely, "My lord, you 2, 47/ 6
us have a mess of them." "Gladly, my lord 2, 47/ 8
servant for a mess of strawberries. The Protector set 2, 47/ 10
dismayed and sore marveling of this manner of sudden 2, 47/ 18
marveling of this manner of sudden change, and what 2, 47/ 19
and imagine the destruction of me -- being so 2, 47/ 22
-- being so near of blood unto the King 2, 47/ 22
the King, and Protector of his royal person and 2, 47/ 23
question should be meant, of which every man wist 2, 47/ 25
At these words many of the other lords were 2, 47/ 31
was not before made of counsel in this matter 2, 48/ 1
matter, as he was of the taking of her 2, 48/ 3
was of the taking of her kindred and of 2, 48/ 3
of her kindred and of their putting to death 2, 48/ 3
and that other witch of her counsel, Shore's wife 2, 48/ 8
would, yet would she of all folk least make 2, 48/ 15
least make Shore's wife of counsel, whom of all 2, 48/ 16
wife of counsel, whom of all women she most 2, 48/ 16
which from the death of King Edward kept Shore's 2, 48/ 19
that while forbore her of reverence toward his King 2, 48/ 21
his King, or else of a certain kind of 2, 48/ 22
of a certain kind of fidelity to his friend 2, 48/ 22
were done, for saving of his oath. So w 2, 49/ 16
upon a long log of timber and there stricken 2, 49/ 22
Windsor, beside the body of King Edward; whose both 2, 49/ 24
hear, either the warnings of that he should have 2, 49/ 25
avoided, or the tokens of that he could not 2, 49/ 26
they should be out of danger ere day. "Ay 2, 50/ 9
night's rest by reason of his day thoughts? Tell 2, 50/ 12
if they were tokens of things to come, why 2, 50/ 14
I am as sure of the man that he 2, 50/ 24
man that he wotteth of as I am of 2, 50/ 24
of as I am of my own hand." "God 2, 50/ 24
yet hath it been of an old rite and 2, 50/ 30
him, as it were of courtesy to accompany him 2, 51/ 2
to the Council, but of truth sent by the 2, 51/ 2
with whom he was of secret confederacy in that 2, 51/ 3
that time, and now of great authority. This knight 2, 51/ 4
You have no need of a priest yet" -- 2, 51/ 9
nor never so full of good hope in his 2, 51/ 11
often seen a sign of change. But I shall 2, 51/ 12
than the vain surety of man's mind so near 2, 51/ 13
one Hastings, a pursuivant of his own name. And 2, 51/ 16
his own name. And of their meeting in that 2, 51/ 16
was put in remembrance of another time in which 2, 51/ 17
stood in great fear of himself. And forasmuch as 2, 51/ 23
he by the lords of the Queen's kindred that 2, 52/ 6
good God, the blindness of our mortal nature! When 2, 52/ 13
knight and a gentle, of great authority with his 2, 52/ 18
authority with his prince; of living somewhat dissolute; plain 2, 52/ 19
beguile, as he that of good heart and courage 2, 52/ 20
Now flew the fame of this lord's death swiftly 2, 52/ 23
many substantial men out of the city into the 2, 52/ 26
himself, with the Duke of Buckingham, stood harnessed in 2, 52/ 27
Lord Chamberlain and others of his conspiracy had contrived 2, 52/ 31
as yet not well-known. Of which their treason he 2, 53/ 3
had knowledge before ten of the clock that same 2, 53/ 4
mistrusted the matter which of truth no man believed 2, 53/ 9
for the further appeasing of the people's mind, he 2, 53/ 10
the haste, one herald of arms with a proclamation 2, 53/ 11
Hastings with divers others of his traitorous purpose had 2, 53/ 15
Protector and the Duke of Buckingham sitting in the 2, 53/ 17
devised to the slander of the Lord Chamberlain, as 2, 53/ 20
redounding to the diminishing of his honor and to 2, 53/ 22
to the universal hurt of his realm, by his 2, 53/ 23
living and inordinate abusion of his body, both with 2, 53/ 25
which was one also of his most secret counsel 2, 53/ 26
his most secret counsel of this heinous treason, with 2, 53/ 27
the most dread commandment of the King's Highness and 2, 53/ 30
the King's Highness and of his honorable and faithful 2, 53/ 30
also lest the delaying of his execution might have 2, 53/ 32
other mischievous persons, partners of his conspiracy, to gather 2, 53/ 33
set hand, and therewith of itself so long a 2, 54/ 5
one that was schoolmaster of Paul's, of chance standing 2, 54/ 10
was schoolmaster of Paul's, of chance standing by, and 2, 54/ 10
and comparing the shortness of the time with the 2, 54/ 11
time with the length of the matter, said unto 2, 54/ 11
sent into the house of Shore's wife (for her 2, 54/ 14
her), and spoiled her of all that ever she 2, 54/ 16
-- above the value of two or three thousand 2, 54/ 17
and that she was of counsel with the Lord 2, 54/ 19
that she was naught of her body. And for 2, 54/ 24
prince, clean and faultless of himself, sent out of 2, 54/ 25
of himself, sent out of heaven into this vicious 2, 54/ 25
world for the amendment of men's manners -- he 2, 54/ 26
he caused the bishop of London to put her 2, 54/ 27
albeit she were out of all array save her 2, 54/ 30
namely while the wondering of the people cast a 2, 54/ 32
rud in her cheeks (of which she before had 2, 54/ 32
that were more amorous of her body than curious 2, 55/ 2
her body than curious of her soul. And many 2, 55/ 3
Protector procured it more of a corrupt intent than 2, 55/ 6
young and goodly and of good substance. But forasmuch 2, 55/ 10
her. Howbeit, the respect of his royalty -- the 2, 55/ 14
royalty -- the hope of gay apparel, ease, pleasure 2, 55/ 15
should guess the beauty of one long before departed 2, 55/ 29
her scalp taken out of the charnel house. For 2, 55/ 30
company, ready and quick of answer, neither mute nor 2, 56/ 3
neither mute nor full of babble, sometimes taunting -- 2, 56/ 4
man could get out of the church lightly to 2, 56/ 9
greater personages, and nevertheless of their humility content to 2, 56/ 11
to forbear the praise of those properties. But the 2, 56/ 12
where men were out of favor, she would bring 2, 56/ 17
offended, she obtained pardon. Of great forfeitures she got 2, 56/ 19
thing to be written of and set among the 2, 56/ 27
set among the remembrances of great matters -- which 2, 56/ 28
unfriended and worn out of acquaintance, after good substance 2, 56/ 31
only by the infamy of their ill deeds. Her 2, 57/ 3
this day she beggeth of many at this day 2, 57/ 12
beheaded in the Tower of London, and about the 2, 57/ 17
and by the order of Sir Richard Radcliff, knight 2, 57/ 21
and in the execution of such lawless enterprises, as 2, 57/ 23
with him, having experience of the world and a 2, 57/ 24
speech, rough and boisterous of behavior, bold in mischief 2, 57/ 25
as from all fear of God. This knight -- 2, 57/ 26
-- bringing them out of the prison to the 2, 57/ 27
judgment, process, or manner of order, to be beheaded 2, 58/ 1
beheaded and rid out of the way, then thought 2, 58/ 4
meant, while the lords of the realm were about 2, 58/ 5
were about him, out of their own strengths, while 2, 58/ 6
put himself in possession of the crown, ere men 2, 58/ 9
means this matter, being of itself so heinous, might 2, 58/ 11
Among whom they made of counsel Edmund Shaa, knight 2, 58/ 16
Shaa, knight, then Mayor of London, which upon trust 2, 58/ 17
London, which upon trust of his own advancement (whereof 2, 58/ 17
advancement (whereof he was, of a proud heart, highly 2, 58/ 18
city to their appetite. Of spiritual men, they took 2, 58/ 19
the people for opinion of their learning, and had 2, 58/ 20
and Friar Penker, Provincial of the Augustinian friars; both 2, 58/ 23
Augustinian friars; both doctors of divinity, both great preachers 2, 58/ 24
both great preachers, both of more learning than virtue 2, 58/ 24
more learning than virtue, of more fame than learning 2, 58/ 25
but after that, never. Of these two, the one 2, 58/ 26
a sermon in praise of the Protector before the 2, 58/ 27
after; both so full of tedious flattery that no 2, 59/ 1
life, for very shame of the world, into which 2, 59/ 5
that Penker was not of counsel of the matter 2, 59/ 8
was not of counsel of the matter before the 2, 59/ 8
that Doctor Shaa was of counsel in the beginning 2, 59/ 11
should by the authority of his preaching incline the 2, 59/ 14
study in the devise of some convenient pretext for 2, 59/ 15
thing and the weighty of all that invention rested 2, 59/ 18
crown by the Duke of York, and the Prince 2, 59/ 21
openly to the rebuke of the Protector's own mother 2, 59/ 25
the truth, for fear of his displeasure. But the 2, 59/ 31
was in peaceable possession of the realm, determining himself 2, 60/ 3
in embassage the Earl of Warwick, with other noblemen 2, 60/ 5
and the king's daughter of Spain. In which thing 2, 60/ 9
which thing the Earl of Warwick found the parties 2, 60/ 9
a widow -- born of noble blood, especially by 2, 60/ 15
mother, which was Duchess of Bedford ere she married 2, 60/ 16
done, and the Earl of Warwick being in his 2, 60/ 24
she was both fair, of a good favor, moderate 2, 61/ 6
a good favor, moderate of stature, well made, and 2, 61/ 6
The King, much marveling of her constancy, as he 2, 61/ 25
virtue in the stead of possession and riches. And 2, 61/ 28
And thus taking counsel of his desire, determined in 2, 61/ 28
then asked he counsel of his other friends, and 2, 61/ 33
nay. Notwithstanding, the Duchess of York, his mother, was 2, 61/ 35
a noble progeny out of his realm -- whereupon 2, 62/ 3
affinity, and great possibility of increase of his possessions 2, 62/ 5
great possibility of increase of his possessions -- and 2, 62/ 5
standing that the Earl of Warwick had so far 2, 62/ 6
whereas the only widowhood of Elizabeth Grey, though she 2, 62/ 24
to the sacred majesty of a prince, that ought 2, 62/ 27
that wist himself out of her rule. And albeit 2, 63/ 3
made for the respect of God, where his grace 2, 63/ 7
than for the regard of any temporal advantage -- 2, 63/ 8
he reckoned the amity of no earthly nation so 2, 63/ 10
him as the friendship of his own; which he 2, 63/ 11
to marry with one of his own land. And 2, 63/ 13
much better by others of his kin, where all 2, 63/ 17
and for the possibility of more possessions lose the 2, 63/ 19
the fruit and pleasure of this that he had 2, 63/ 19
pleasure taketh a man of all that ever he 2, 63/ 20
sure that my cousin of Warwick neither loveth me 2, 63/ 29
I should in choice of a wife rather be 2, 63/ 32
marry by the appointment of a guardian! I would 2, 64/ 1
own liberty in choice of my own marriage. As 2, 64/ 2
marriage. As for possibility of more inheritance by new 2, 64/ 3
is often the occasion of more trouble than profit 2, 64/ 4
too! And so each of us hath a proof 2, 64/ 11
a proof that neither of us is likely to 2, 64/ 12
it that, under pretext of her duty to Godward 2, 64/ 22
it were in discharge of her conscience, that the 2, 64/ 28
before God. By reason of which words, such obstacle 2, 64/ 30
proceed to the solemnization of this wedding till these 2, 64/ 32
But when the Earl of Warwick understood of this 2, 65/ 13
Earl of Warwick understood of this marriage, he took 2, 65/ 13
remained for the space of two years, leaving his 2, 65/ 23
where she was delivered of Edward, the prince of 2, 65/ 24
of Edward, the prince of whom we before have 2, 65/ 25
which meantime the Earl of Warwick took out of 2, 65/ 26
of Warwick took out of prison and set up 2, 65/ 27
muchwhat by the power of the Earl of Warwick 2, 65/ 29
power of the Earl of Warwick, which was a 2, 65/ 29
a courageous warrior, and of such strength, what for 2, 65/ 30
field slew the Earl of Warwick with many other 2, 66/ 4
many other great estates of that party, and so 2, 66/ 4
but by the discord of his very friends, or 2, 66/ 7
very friends, or falsehood of his feigned friends. I 2, 66/ 7
himself nor the Duke of Clarence were lawfully begotten 2, 66/ 19
not the very children of the Duke of York 2, 66/ 20
children of the Duke of York, but begotten unlawfully 2, 66/ 20
persons by the adultery of the Duchess, their mother 2, 66/ 21
was verily the wife of King Edward, and so 2, 66/ 22
generation after the laws of matrimony, then declared he 2, 66/ 30
and for the punishment of their parents were for 2, 66/ 32
and especially in adultery. Of which though some, by 2, 66/ 33
some, by the ignorance of the world and the 2, 66/ 34
the proof and confirmation of this sentence certain examples 2, 67/ 6
certain examples taken out of the Old Testament and 2, 67/ 7
descend into the praise of the Lord Richard, late 2, 67/ 8
Lord Richard, late Duke of York, calling him "father 2, 67/ 8
and declared the title of his heirs unto the 2, 67/ 9
was, after the death of King Henry VI, entailed 2, 67/ 10
VI, entailed by authority of Parliament. Then showed he 2, 67/ 11
his very right heir, of his body lawfully begotten 2, 67/ 12
himself nor the Duke of Clarence among those that 2, 67/ 23
surely for the children of the noble duke, as 2, 67/ 24
prince, that special pattern of knightly prowess, as well 2, 67/ 28
the lineaments and favor of his visage" represented "the 2, 67/ 29
represented "the very face of the noble duke his 2, 67/ 30
countenance, the very print of his visage, the sure 2, 67/ 31
the plain, express likeness of that noble duke." Now 2, 67/ 32
that in the speaking of these words the Protector 2, 67/ 33
any deduction thereunto, out of all order and out 2, 68/ 14
all order and out of all frame, began to 2, 68/ 14
prince, the special pattern of knightly prowess, which as 2, 68/ 15
the lineaments and favor of his visage representeth the 2, 68/ 17
representeth the very face of the noble duke of 2, 68/ 17
of the noble duke of York his father. This 2, 68/ 18
countenance, the very print of his visage, the sure 2, 68/ 19
the plain, express likeness of the noble duke, whose 2, 68/ 20
accompanied with the Duke of Buckingham, went through the 2, 68/ 22
into stones, for wonder of this shameful sermon. After 2, 68/ 26
but kept him out of sight, like an owl 2, 68/ 29
what the people talked of him, all were it 2, 68/ 30
every man's mouth spoken of him much shame, it 2, 68/ 33
in London the Duke of Buckingham, accompanied with divers 2, 69/ 2
in the east end of the hall (where the 2, 69/ 5
him, all the commons of the city gathered before 2, 69/ 6
was neither unlearned and of nature marvelously well-spoken) he 2, 69/ 9
voice, in this manner of wise: "Friends, for the 2, 69/ 10
to break unto you of a matter right great 2, 69/ 13
nor to no part of the realm more profitable 2, 69/ 15
to you, the citizens of this noble city. For 2, 69/ 16
that? Certes, the surety of your own bodies, the 2, 69/ 21
own bodies, the quiet of your wives and your 2, 69/ 21
your daughters, the safeguard of your goods -- of 2, 69/ 22
of your goods -- of all which things in 2, 69/ 22
For who was there of you all that would 2, 69/ 23
would reckon himself lord of his own goods, among 2, 69/ 24
many taxes and tallages, of which there was never 2, 69/ 26
were, it rather grew of riot and unreasonable waste 2, 69/ 27
and honest, great substance of goods to be lashed 2, 69/ 29
nor any usual names of known taxes -- but 2, 69/ 31
under an easy name of "benevolence and good will 2, 69/ 32
the commissioners so much of every man took as 2, 69/ 32
as no man would of his good will have 2, 70/ 1
As though the name of "benevolence" had signified that 2, 70/ 2
pay, not what himself of his good will list 2, 70/ 3
but what the King of his good will list 2, 70/ 3
we should remember you of examples by name -- 2, 70/ 12
beheaded, by the misconstruing of the laws of this 2, 70/ 15
misconstruing of the laws of this realm for the 2, 70/ 15
than to the dishonesty of those that, either for 2, 70/ 19
-- alderman and mayor of this noble city! Who 2, 70/ 22
noble city! Who is of you either so negligent 2, 70/ 24
-- what speak we of loss? his utter spoil 2, 70/ 26
I suppose, to rehearse of these any more by 2, 70/ 28
no crime so great, of which there could lack 2, 71/ 2
King, preventing the time of his inheritance, attained the 2, 71/ 3
man for a pretext of treason to have been 2, 71/ 4
treason to have been of kindred or alliance, near 2, 71/ 4
leger acquaintance, with any of those that were at 2, 71/ 5
besides the common adventure of open war, which albeit 2, 71/ 9
the well and occasion of much mischief, yet is 2, 71/ 10
what about the getting of the garland, keeping it 2, 71/ 16
hath twice the winning of France. In which inward 2, 71/ 18
been so great effusion of the ancient noble blood 2, 71/ 20
the ancient noble blood of this realm that scarcely 2, 71/ 20
to the great enfeebling of this noble land, besides 2, 71/ 22
displeasure, were not out of peril. For whom trusted 2, 71/ 26
could not? What manner of folk he most favored 2, 71/ 29
honor, spare to speak of. Howbeit, this wot you 2, 71/ 30
am sorry to speak of, saving that it is 2, 72/ 4
but without any fear of God or respect of 2, 72/ 9
of God or respect of his honor, murmur or 2, 72/ 9
honor, murmur or grudge of the world, he would 2, 72/ 10
to the great destruction of many a good woman 2, 72/ 11
which, being honest people of themselves, so much regard 2, 72/ 13
much regard the cleanness of their house, the chastity 2, 72/ 14
their house, the chastity of their wives and their 2, 72/ 14
ye here, the citizens of this noble city -- 2, 72/ 18
you is most plenty of all such things as 2, 72/ 19
treat as any part of his realm -- not 2, 72/ 22
the specially well-renowned city of his realm) much honorable 2, 72/ 25
borne to the house of York -- since he 2, 72/ 29
worthily acquitted, there is of that house that now 2, 72/ 30
whole sum and effect of this our present errand 2, 72/ 31
ye have already heard of him that can better 2, 73/ 1
better tell it, and of whom, I am sure 2, 73/ 2
should reckon my words of as great authority as 2, 73/ 4
authority as the preacher's of the word of God 2, 73/ 4
preacher's of the word of God, namely a man 2, 73/ 4
excellent prince Richard, Duke of Gloucester, now Protector of 2, 73/ 11
of Gloucester, now Protector of this realm, hath unto 2, 73/ 11
the crown and kingdom of the same. For as 2, 73/ 12
unto you, the children of King Edward the Fourth 2, 73/ 15
his, and the mingling of whose bloods together hath 2, 73/ 20
hath been the effusion of great part of the 2, 73/ 20
effusion of great part of the noble blood of 2, 73/ 21
of the noble blood of this realm. Whereby it 2, 73/ 21
marriage not well made, of which there is so 2, 73/ 22
mischief grown. For lack of which lawful coupling, and 2, 73/ 23
lawful coupling, and also of other things (which the 2, 73/ 23
knoweth, in avoiding displeasure of my noble Lord Protector 2, 73/ 26
to wit, for lack of other issue lawfully coming 2, 73/ 30
other issue lawfully coming of the late noble prince 2, 73/ 30
noble prince Richard, Duke of York, to whose royal 2, 73/ 31
royal blood the crown of England and of France 2, 73/ 31
crown of England and of France is by the 2, 73/ 32
by the high authority of Parliament entailed -- the 2, 73/ 32
the right and title of the same is, by 2, 73/ 33
by the just course of inheritance, according to the 2, 73/ 33
to the common law of this land, devolved and 2, 74/ 1
very lawfully begotten son of the fore-remembered noble duke 2, 74/ 3
the fore-remembered noble duke of York. Which thing well 2, 74/ 3
nobles and commons also of this realm (and especially 2, 74/ 5
this realm (and especially of the north parts), not 2, 74/ 6
to have the rule of the land, nor the 2, 74/ 7
the guiding and governance of this realm, to the 2, 74/ 11
the wealth and increase of the same, according to 2, 74/ 11
labor and study both of mind and of body 2, 74/ 14
both of mind and of body that shall come 2, 74/ 14
righteously entitled thereunto, is of so sad age, and 2, 74/ 20
sad age, and thereto of so great wisdom joined 2, 74/ 21
ye, the worshipful citizens of this the chief city 2, 74/ 24
this the chief city of this realm, join with 2, 74/ 24
word was there answered of all the people that 2, 75/ 16
he with other partners of that counsel drew about 2, 75/ 19
which is the mouth of the city; and haply 2, 75/ 21
rehearsal to the commons of that the Duke had 2, 75/ 28
but that the lords of this realm and the 2, 76/ 4
realm and the commons of other parts might have 2, 76/ 4
as all the nobles of the realm be -- 2, 76/ 9
it were, the sound of a swarm of bees 2, 76/ 15
sound of a swarm of bees; till at the 2, 76/ 15
in the nether end of the hall, an ambushment 2, 76/ 16
the hall, an ambushment of the Duke's servants and 2, 76/ 16
their caps in token of joy. And they that 2, 76/ 20
very merry; and some of those that came thither 2, 77/ 3
wall while the dolor of their heart burst out 2, 77/ 5
aldermen and chief commoners of the city, in their 2, 77/ 9
their appointment, the Duke of Buckingham, with divers noblemen 2, 77/ 12
unto the Lord Protector of the being there of 2, 77/ 14
of the being there of a great and honorable 2, 77/ 14
first knew some part of their errand; as though 2, 77/ 17
partly distrusted the coming of such number unto him 2, 77/ 18
to purpose their intent, of which they would unto 2, 77/ 25
last he came forth of his chamber -- and 2, 77/ 26
And thereupon the Duke of Buckingham first made humble 2, 77/ 29
him, on the behalf of them all, that His 2, 77/ 31
His Grace the intent of their coming without his 2, 77/ 32
bold to move him of that matter. In which 2, 78/ 2
he was very gentle of himself and also longed 2, 78/ 5
bore them all, none of them anything would intend 2, 78/ 8
it would like him, of his accustomed goodness and 2, 78/ 12
now with his eye of pity to behold the 2, 78/ 13
long-continued distress and decay of the same and to 2, 78/ 14
the crown and governance of this realm, according to 2, 78/ 17
and to the laud of God, profit of the 2, 78/ 20
laud of God, profit of the land, and unto 2, 78/ 21
obeisance as the people of this realm under his 2, 78/ 23
about than the crown of any one, of which 2, 78/ 28
crown of any one, of which he was never 2, 78/ 29
in this little while of his protectorship (the praise 2, 79/ 8
in that the malice of such as were before 2, 79/ 9
as were before occasion of the contrary, and of 2, 79/ 10
of the contrary, and of new intended to be 2, 79/ 10
the Mayor and Recorder of London. And after that 2, 79/ 14
may wit, would never of likelihood have inclined thereunto 2, 79/ 26
right heir, lawfully begotten of the body of our 2, 80/ 1
begotten of the body of our most dear father 2, 80/ 1
father, Richard, late Duke of York; to which title 2, 80/ 2
the nobles and commons of this realm, which we 2, 80/ 3
this realm, which we of all titles possible take 2, 80/ 3
estate, preeminence, and kingdom of the two noble realms 2, 80/ 9
obedience unto this realm of England, the advancement whereof 2, 80/ 12
whereof we never ask of God longer to live 2, 80/ 15
people departed, talking diversely of the matter, every man 2, 80/ 19
they talked and marveled of the manner of this 2, 80/ 20
marveled of the manner of this dealing, that the 2, 80/ 20
For at the consecration of a bishop, every man 2, 80/ 27
good to show out of season what acquaintance he 2, 81/ 3
in his majesty, one of his tormentors might hap 2, 81/ 4
and worthy, for marring of the play." And so 2, 81/ 5
himself in the Court of the King's Bench, declared 2, 81/ 16
was the chiefest duty of a king to minister 2, 81/ 21
in conclusion, all kind of men -- but specially 2, 81/ 24
but specially the lawyers of this realm. And finally 2, 81/ 25
him the good will of the people -- when 2, 81/ 27
had declared the discommodity of discord and the commodities 2, 81/ 28
discord and the commodities of concord and unity, he 2, 81/ 28
he did put out of his mind all enmities 2, 81/ 29
Who being brought out of the sanctuary by (for 2, 81/ 33
he fled, for fear of him), in the sight 2, 81/ 34
him), in the sight of the people he took 2, 82/ 1
reign the twenty-sixth day of June (after this mockish 2, 82/ 8
crowned the sixth day of July. And that solemnity 2, 82/ 9
appointed for the coronation of his nephew. Now fell 2, 82/ 11
through all the time of his reign never ceased 2, 82/ 14
mean the lamentable murder of his innocent nephews, the 2, 82/ 18
taken for the younger of those two, but for 2, 82/ 25
for the common custom of close and covert dealing 2, 82/ 28
to write the time of the late noble prince 2, 83/ 1
the late noble prince of famous memory King Henry 2, 83/ 1
or percase that history of Perkin in any compendious 2, 83/ 2
you the dolorous end of those babes, not after 2, 83/ 4
new honor the town of which he bore the 2, 83/ 8
he bore the name of his old, devised, as 2, 83/ 9
as though the killing of his kinsmen could amend 2, 83/ 13
Sir Robert Brackenbury, Constable of the Tower, with a 2, 83/ 16
unto a secret page of his, "Ah, whom shall 2, 83/ 24
which was a man of right goodly personage, and 2, 83/ 31
under by the means of Sir Richard Radcliff and 2, 84/ 5
for no more partners of the prince's favor -- 2, 84/ 7
by secret drifts out of all secret trust. Which 2, 84/ 9
Wherefore, this occasion offered, of very special friendship he 2, 84/ 11
Sir Thomas Tyrell -- of person like, and brethren 2, 84/ 17
person like, and brethren of blood, but nothing of 2, 84/ 17
of blood, but nothing of kin in conditions. Then 2, 84/ 17
James all the keys of the Tower for one 2, 84/ 23
points, nor aught recked of himself, but with that 2, 85/ 8
traitorous death delivered them of that wretchedness. For Sir 2, 85/ 10
appointed Miles Forest, one of the four that kept 2, 85/ 12
souls into the joys of heaven, leaving to the 2, 85/ 22
struggling with the pains of death, and after, long 2, 85/ 25
Which, upon the sight of them, caused those murderers 2, 85/ 27
under a great heap of stones. Then rode Sir 2, 85/ 29
him all the manner of the murder, who gave 2, 86/ 1
Lo the honorable courage of a king!) Whereupon they 2, 86/ 5
say that a priest of Sir Robert Brackenbury took 2, 86/ 6
as, by the occasion of his death which only 2, 86/ 8
as I have learned of them that much knew 2, 86/ 14
innocent, tender children, born of most royal blood, brought 2, 86/ 16
traitorous tyranny taken, deprived of their estate, shortly shut 2, 86/ 18
by the cruel ambition of their unnatural uncle and 2, 86/ 19
worketh the proud enterprise of an high heart, or 2, 86/ 23
field, hacked and hewed of his enemies' hands, harried 2, 87/ 5
less than three years of the mischief that he 2, 87/ 7
heard by credible report, of such as were secret 2, 87/ 10
start up, leap out of his bed, and run 2, 87/ 18
impression and stormy remembrance of his abominable deed. Now 2, 87/ 20
-- between the Duke of Buckingham and many other 2, 87/ 23
Duke fell out is of diverse folk diverse-wise pretended 2, 88/ 1
soon as the Duke of Gloucester, upon the death 2, 88/ 2
Gloucester, upon the death of King Edward, came to 2, 88/ 2
John Ward, a chamberer of like secret trust with 2, 88/ 5
trust with the Duke of Gloucester, desiring that in 2, 88/ 6
the presence and speech of his master. And the 2, 88/ 8
master. And the Duke of Gloucester, advertised of his 2, 88/ 8
Duke of Gloucester, advertised of his desire, caused him 2, 88/ 8
him in the dead of the night, after all 2, 88/ 9
and some secret instruction of the Protector's mind, yet 2, 88/ 14
York, with many gentlemen of the north country (to 2, 88/ 17
country (to the number of six hundred horses), was 2, 88/ 18
still continued with, partner of all his devices, till 2, 89/ 2
And surely the occasion of their variance is of 2, 89/ 7
of their variance is of diverse men diversely reported 2, 89/ 7
among other things required of the Protector the Duke 2, 89/ 9
the Protector the Duke of Hereford's lands, to which 2, 89/ 9
crown by the line of King Henry before deprived 2, 89/ 12
in hatred and despite of him. And they say 2, 89/ 22
ever after, continually, each of them lived in such 2, 89/ 23
such hatred and distrust of other that the Duke 2, 89/ 24
the deep dissimulating nature of those both men considered 2, 90/ 3
world the Protector had of the Duke, and in 2, 90/ 4
fell once in suspicion of the tyrant) that either 2, 90/ 5
give the Duke occasion of displeasure, or the Duke 2, 90/ 6
Duke the Protector occasion of mistrust. And utterly men 2, 90/ 7
could bear the glory of another; so that I 2, 90/ 10
that I have heard, of some that said they 2, 90/ 11
say that he was of truth not well at 2, 90/ 14
taken, nor any demand of the Duke's uncourteously rejected 2, 90/ 15
custody (by the commandment of King Richard) Doctor Morton 2, 90/ 18
Richard) Doctor Morton, Bishop of Ely (who, as ye 2, 90/ 19
Bishop was a man of great natural wit, very 2, 90/ 22
fast upon the part of King Henry while that 2, 90/ 24
gentlemen together in aid of King Henry, devising first 2, 91/ 7
realm by the conjunction of those two bloods in 2, 91/ 10
again, made him Archbishop of Canterbury and Chancellor of 2, 91/ 14
of Canterbury and Chancellor of England, whereunto the Pope 2, 91/ 14
Pope joined the honor of Cardinal. Thus living many 2, 91/ 15
alternate proof as well of prosperity as adverse fortune 2, 91/ 18
very mother and mistress of wisdom) a deep insight 2, 91/ 20
perceiving by the process of their communications the Duke's 2, 91/ 23
out a little braid of envy toward the glory 2, 91/ 24
envy toward the glory of the King, and thereby 2, 91/ 24
taking always the occasion of his coming, and so 2, 91/ 26
if the secret judgment of God have otherwise provided 2, 92/ 12
for which he procured of the King to have 2, 92/ 23
put in the hands of them with whom he 2, 92/ 25
much to talk much of princes, as thing not 2, 92/ 28
thing not all out of peril, though the word 2, 92/ 28
proclaimed that on pain of death there should none 2, 93/ 2
his forehead a bunch of flesh fled away a 2, 93/ 4
were once hence, because of this proclamation made of 2, 93/ 6
of this proclamation made of horned beasts." "What, fool 2, 93/ 7
But for the weal of this realm whereof His 2, 93/ 19
have given him some of such other excellent virtues 2, 93/ 23
meet for the rule of a realm, as our 2, 93/ 24
planted in the person of Your Grace." 2, 93/ 25